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Comment: Re:free software and open source (Score 2, Insightful) 634

by jbellows_20 (#28824239) Attached to: Linus Calls Microsoft Hatred "a Disease"
This driver, if I understood it correctly, has no other purpose but to enable a proprietary VM to work with the kernel (correct me if I'm wrong). If I'm right, I see no reason why it should ever be included in it.

This seems like very odd logic as if followed through, we shouldn't allow any drivers into the kernel. Every driver in the kernel has the express purpose of making a proprietary piece of hardware work in Linux, whether coded by the manufacturer or not. The truth behind your statement is exactly what Linus was referring to, the "M$ Disease." Simply because it is Microsoft you feel the complete and utter need to bash it. No rhyme or reason. Defies all logic. It just must be done.

This is a great step for the Linux community. I doubt very few people would believe that Microsoft would ever become a contributor to the Linux kernel. They have made an investment now in Linux. That is quite monumental. Those 20,000 lines of code weren't free and they will likely be continued to be maintained. This is an exciting time!

Comment: Re:I know this is slashdot..... but XP (Score 1) 432

by jbellows_20 (#27384155) Attached to: I typically stick with the same desktop environment
Honestly, I'm not sure why this even matters.

Restarting the GUI in Linux is common because of (at least in my experience) how unstable, relative to the Windows GUI, X and the windows managers are.

The real thing I love is how Windows XP can have its GUI running and all supporting processes and only take up between 85-90MB of memory. To get a similar GUI in Linux requires 2-3 times that much memory.
Data Storage

+ - 48GigaBYTE flash chip->

Submitted by Hal_Porter
Hal_Porter (817932) writes "Hynix have stacked 24 16 gigabit (2 gigabyte) NAND flash chips in a 1.4mm thick package, giving 48 gigabytes of storage. It's not clear if it's possible to write to them in parallel — if so the device should be pretty damn fast. The usual objection to NAND flash as a hard drive replacement is lifetime. NAND sectors can only be written 100,000 times or so before they wear out, but wear levelling can be done to spread writes evenly over at least each chip. I worked out that the lifetime should be much longer than a typical magnetic hard disk. There's no information on costs yet frankly and it sounds like an expensive proof of concept, but it shows you the sort of device that will take over from small hard disks in the next few years."
Link to Original Source
Businesses

+ - Citrix co-founder gets FAA OK to rev up airline->

Submitted by
coondoggie
coondoggie writes "DayJet , the brainchild of Citrix co-founder Ed Iacobucci, said Wednesday that the Federal Aviation Administration has approved its use of six-seat jets in a proposed on-demand air service that for now would link five Florida cities. In the planning stages for over five years, DayJet's jet aircraft will be furnished by another ex-techie bigwig, Vern Raburn who used to work for Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. Earlier this year Raburn's Eclipse Aviation got the FAA greenlight to begin full-scale production of its Eclipse 500 Very Light Jets (VLJ) , over 300 of which are slated to go to Iacobucci's DayJet, in the next two years. http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/19093"
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Power

+ - ConEd to end DC power service in Manhattan->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The New York Daily News reports that ConEd has received approval to end its DC power service in New York City:

The utility has won state permission to switch off its direct current service, which Thomas Edison powered up in Manhattan 125 years ago yesterday. It now provides DC power to just five customers in Manhattan. The Public Service Commission order is the last gasp of a century-old war between Edison, a direct-current proponent, and Nikola Tesla, who invented alternating current.
"

Link to Original Source
Hardware Hacking

+ - Embedded Appliance-Specific Platforms?

Submitted by
HaloZero
HaloZero writes "Having just recently discovered pfSense, I am now looking for a platform to run it on. It's running currently on a 2.2GHz P4 with a gig of RAM, and that seems to be way, way too overkill for this type of application. The box itself is also huge in comparison to what I'm used to having as my 'firewall' appliance. I've done some looking into MiniITX stuff like the VIA EPIA offerings (and those seem to be the most promising), but the cases are still very large. I'd prefer a device that offers me a small case, compact flash (or an IDE port) fanless, and atleast three ethernet ports. Has anyone out there had any success with any of these small, embedded platforms? Form factors, hardware, their cases, loading media onto the device — what else should I be wary of?; that sort of thing. For the sake of argument, pfSense's hardware requirements are pretty basic; a 233MHz CPU and 128MB of RAM will do you just fine."

The IBM purchase of ROLM gives new meaning to the term "twisted pair". -- Howard Anderson, "Yankee Group"

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