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Operating Systems

Submission + - Adobe to move all its apps to run on the web (

E1ven writes: "Adobe today announced they they will be transitioning their entire suite of apps, including Photoshop, Illustrator and After Effects to run as web-based applications.
This is a strong bet on the future of web applications, and if successful puts Adobe in a strong position to control the API for the next generation of development.
Perhaps the most intriguing part is that it will make Desktop OS almost irrelevant, allowing Photoshop and it's ilk on Linux without compatibility woes."


Submission + - The 150 mpg Toyota Prius

An anonymous reader writes: The Toyota Prius somewhat has become the posterchild for fuel efficient cars, at least in the U.S. But it is an open secret that the car may not be quite as fuel efficient as you would expect and if you aren't trying to sqeezed out every possible mile like hypermilers. If you are unhappy with the mileage per gallon performance of your Prius, then there is an actual way to push the mpg rating into insane regions, without having to use slipstreaming on your commutes: TG Daily has a feature (with video) on the car and A123 systems (the guys providing the batteries for the Killacycle), which offers an aftermarket battery kit that apparently can result in 150 mpg or more — or virtually infinite mpg, if you recharge the car every 50 miles. Cost? $10,000.
Data Storage

Submission + - Hard drive imports may be banned (

Arathon writes: "Apparently the International Trade Commission is beginning an investigation that could lead to the banning of hard drive imports from Western Digital, Seagate, and Toshiba, among others, on the grounds that they fundamentally violate patents held by Steven and Mary Reiber of California. The patent apparently has to do with "dissipative ceramic bonding tips", which are important components of the drives themselves.
Obviously, a ban would be unthinkable, and yet the ITC has 45 days to settle on a fixed date for the end of the investigation. If the patents are found to be violated, and the Reibers do not allow those patents to be bought or otherwise dealt with, the importation of almost all hard drives would actually be ceased."

Why did the Roman Empire collapse? What is the Latin for office automation?