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Comment: Laydown Desk And Pee A Lot (Score 1) 262

by jareth780 (#40959191) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Is the Best Position To Work For Long Hours?

I'm not kidding. When I work at home, I use a laydown desk (basically a cot/lawn chair with some strategically placed pillows), and my monitor is placed on the edge of a small table, and I drink a lot of liquids (mostly water), so I'm constantly forced to get up and reposition. It's not the most efficient way to work, but it seems to have the least impact on my body. My keyboard is in my lap, and I use a bamboo tablet on a stack of books. I wouldn't be able to do this at an office, but if I was asked to work extra hours I would be working those hours at home anyway.

All that being said, hacks like this aren't really solutions. We all need to exercise and minimize our computer use, there's just no real way around that. I think this is all just damage control.

+ - Making Data Centers More People-Friendly->

Submitted by 1sockchuck
1sockchuck (826398) writes "Data centers are designed to house servers, not people. This has often meant trade-offs for data center staffers, who brave 100-degree hot aisles and perform their work at laptop carts. But some data center developers are rethinking this approach and designing people-friendly data centers with Class-A offices and amenities for staff and visitors. Is this the future of data center design?"
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Image

IT Worker's Revenge Lands Her In Jail 347

Posted by samzenpus
from the bad-idea dept.
aesoteric writes "A 30-year-old IT worker at a Florida-based health centre was this week sentenced to 19 months in a US federal prison for hacking, and then locking, her former employer's IT systems. Four days after being fired from the Suncoast Community Health Centers' for insubordination, Patricia Marie Fowler exacter her revenge by hacking the centre's systems, deleting files, changing passwords, removing access to infrastructure systems, and tampering with pay and accrued leave rates of staff."
Classic Games (Games)

The Best Video Games On Awful Systems 272

Posted by Soulskill
from the diamond-in-the-rough dept.
Buffalo55 writes "For the most part, classic games manage to reappear on different systems. Just look at Nintendo. The publisher has done an excellent job bringing NES, SNES, Genesis and even old school Neo Geo titles to the Wii's Virtual Console, while Microsoft's Game Room brings the best of Atari's 2600 into the living room. Of course, not every console was a success. The '90s, in particular, saw quite a few flops from companies like Panasonic, Sega and Atari. Just because a system is a failure, though, doesn't mean all of its games suck. On the contrary, most of these machines have a few gems that fell between the cracks once the console croaked." What overlooked game on a failed platform would you like to see revived?
XBox (Games)

An Early Look At Halo: Reach 107

Posted by Soulskill
from the go-go-gadget-arms? dept.
KatanAlpha writes "Based on all the information coming out about Halo: Reach, it seems that Bungie's basic philosophy has been: 'The sequels to the first Halo sucked. Let's fix that.' We've already seen a little bit of this with Halo: ODST, wherein Bungie returned to some of the core elements of Halo gameplay and ditched many of the changes introduced in Halo 2 and 3. Reach seems to continue this idea while trying to invigorate the franchise by introducing greatly improved graphics and additional gameplay mechanics."
Education

Computer Games and Traditional CS Courses 173

Posted by Soulskill
from the terrible-terrible-games dept.
drroman22 writes "Schools are working to put real-world relevance into computer science education by integrating video game development into traditional CS courses. Quoting: 'Many CS educators recognized and took advantage of younger generations' familiarity and interests for computer video games and integrate related contents into their introductory programming courses. Because these are the first courses students encounter, they build excitement and enthusiasm for our discipline. ... Much of this work reported resounding successes with drastically increased enrollments and student successes. Based on these results, it is well recognized that integrating computer gaming into CS1 and CS2 (CS1/2) courses, the first programming courses students encounter, is a promising strategy for recruiting and retaining potential students." While a focus on games may help stir interest, it seems as though game development studios are as yet unimpressed by most game-related college courses. To those who have taken such courses or considered hiring those who have: what has your experience been?

Heisenberg may have been here.

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