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Comment: Re:You tell 'em Timothy! (Score 1) 160

by jappleng (#35354272) Attached to: New Hampshire Man Sentenced To 7 Years For Robo-Calling Malware
T1 is pretty slow, common DSL is faster than T1 connection. T3 on the other hand runs at about 44.6Mbps which is fairly decent, but truthfully anything over 3Mbps with a decent pipeline is fast enough since web-servers don't allocate their entire bandwidth to a single user, however sites like Youtube require you to have at the very least 13 or 14mbps. However, this is straying from the point that the majority of the world-wide-web is connected via HSI (200kbps+), and I know you were trying to troll but the United States is ranked about #30 as far as average internet speed.

Going back on topic, it's not surprising that this kind of scam still exists. I remember dialer malware used to be very popular back in the day. I think there was a /. article recently about how most of AOL's consumers are by those who forgot they had the service or just don't mind having it as a secondary service. Funny yet sad stuff.

Comment: Re:Printing on PAPER!? With INK!? (Score 1, Funny) 252

by jappleng (#35354118) Attached to: Compared to a year or two ago, I find I'm printing ...
I feel bad for you, thinking that Coal is environmentally unfriendly... But if you're going to go that far, I'm going to suggest you try switching over to TBE. Tire Burning Energy is the bouncy wave of the future! There are billions of unused tires in this world but yet nothing is done with them, until now. It's not only safe, but it also provides the oxygen that asthma patients need, and in liquefied state it can be used as printer ink.

(Secretly I'm the kind of guy who doesn't own a printer but goes to a friend's house and asks if I can use it. I'm a douche for sure, but they always ask me to fix their computers so I guess we're even)

Comment: Re:Sometimes good things happen . . . (Score 2) 97

by jappleng (#35344690) Attached to: Sony PlayStation 3 Imports Temporarily Banned In Europe
(slightly redundant) I have to agree with you. Patents were introduced to stimulate innovation and research but all it really does today is stimulate the front pockets of lawyers. I want to say "why after so many years have they decided to wait and sue Sony?" but Sony does sue pretty much everyone so I don't feel that bad or care for the reason why LG waited so long.

Comment: Re:Depends (Score 1) 244

by jappleng (#35336188) Attached to: Is Attending a CS Conference Worth the Time?
I was going to give you +1 but you posted as anonymous coward :( I really think that your answer pretty sums up this thread since it's impossible to determine without more information or assuming certain things... If you're going to go, at least be well prepared and know how to mingle and display yourself in mixers. At the end of the conference, there will certainly be a mixer so giving out business cards and learning everyone's names and what they do will be a challenging task as a first timer (assuming). From what I've heard though, your biggest benefit from this kind of conference will be after the fact, so if you're going to go, you're basically traveling to meet up with people. I'm certain that there are mixers every day near your place about various things. You should look at the local chamber of commerce website for information about this.

Comment: derp (Score 1) 609

by jappleng (#35335816) Attached to: IT Graduates Not "Well-Trained, Ready-To-Go"
So they wanted surgeons so instead they hired a nurse? Anyone can pass the A+ exam, get CISCO certified, and 20 other certificates, it's not too difficult. But taking what you learn from that and putting into practice is an entirely different story. Even then, someone fresh out of college won't know very much about how the business world really works unless they've been actively part of it for quite some time. They also may not know the tricks of the trade or even have much exposure to real life scenarios. This is true for any major, which is why they get hired for less than those who have experience. However, there is a catch to hiring old farts... They tend to stick with traditional methods or know older things, but not necessarily what's new. True, they should be re-certified, or trained with the new stuff but sometimes the younger generation has a better understanding of it. There really isn't a perfect employee and it would seem that the one who knows everything is the biggest arrogant douchebag of the bunch. So you can't fire him because he does his job so darn well, but at the same time he's bringing down morale at the office (Grandma's Boy anyone?). Ah well, ces't la vie.

Comment: Re:Link A has more hits than link B (Score 1) 134

by jappleng (#35335802) Attached to: Windows Browser Ballot: the Winners and the Losers
I've developed websites commercially for many years and adding compatibility just means more work and higher cost for producing websites. It doesn't mean that you get paid less for more work. It's not terribly difficult to create IE compatibility, and in most cases, you just need to add about 200 lines of extra CSS on your high-end website that is conditioned to work for IE browsers. Websites should work on the three biggest platforms and the only real concern about browsers is efficiency, security, and how much memory it uses for a simple user. A power user might need firefox extensions and someone who prefers just the basics can go with any other major browser since developers build compatibility for IE and Firefox mostly. Other browsers tend to work fine if it works under Firefox if programmed correctly.

It really doesn't matter if someone knows what a browser is or not, they all essentially do the same in the end. I dislike IE with a passion but it loads websites perfectly fine. It's been a while since I've installed a Mac but doesn't that only come with Safari? Doesn't Ubuntu only come with Firefox? The only reason why this whole situation came to be is because some of the smaller browsers that nobody ever heard of decided to petition this movement so they can be better known. They aren't needed as a browser, there are plenty of major browsers to choose from already, and if we have to start writing conditionals for them it'll make the cost of building websites even higher. I'm very glad that windows doesn't come bundled with the choice of web browser in my country because we're fine making decisions on our own.

Comment: Re:Link A has more hits than link B (Score 1, Insightful) 134

by jappleng (#35329302) Attached to: Windows Browser Ballot: the Winners and the Losers
I agree that there is a choice. The choice between buying the product or not buying it. Microsoft doesn't force people to use only their browser. Microsoft only supplies a pre-bundled browser. If you google web browser in google, you will get firefox as the first hit, not chrome. If it were chrome, there wouldn't be much of a problem either since it's an excellent browser to begin win. People can search for whatever browser they desire, and they can find charts of what browser supports what. It's not Microsoft's problem if people don't know how to do research, a skill that is learned early in life. Even if Microsoft were to force people to use only IE, it's their right to do so as a corporation. If people don't like that, they can go somewhere else. I know that's how I felt with the iPad, I went to Android and am happy with the move.

People ultimately have the choice for what they do in life, what they download, and the things they decide to make. They can also choose to ignore, stop using, and move someplace else if they're not satisfied with what's going on. The thing that makes America so great is the freedom to make decisions, the ones you want to do to build your life, your business, and even your country. It is a matter of choice that is given to you, whether you know you have it or not, it is there. It will be a grim day when America is nannied like those in the UK (no offense but it doesn't work too well with capitalism). - 2cents

Comment: zombies love me because of my [blank] (Score 1) 364

by jappleng (#35320836) Attached to: Considering the sum of all of my storage devices ...
I believe my brain has more storage capacity than anything I own combined and I must have about 20tb of storage locally. Then again we don't know just how much storage capacity our brain has nor do we know how to accurately compare it even if we knew the storage size. Some say we don't have enough hard drives in the world to fill our brain, some say it's only 2tb some say it's an exactobyte or whatever it is. I think it's not that much but we have on heck of a way to compress and decompress memories so to speak.

Comment: Re:Clocked at 40? KM/hr perhaps... (Score 1) 254

by jappleng (#35320804) Attached to: Smart Phone Gets Driver Out of a Speeding Ticket
That's actually a very good point, and another thing I would like to add is that every time a cop stops someone for speeding they should be able to archive video evidence until it can be purged. Maybe that's how it's done usually? I don't know, heck, I have never really seen inside a police car before so I have no idea how things are done in the police world. I only have police academy to help me visualize how it might be...

If I'd known computer science was going to be like this, I'd never have given up being a rock 'n' roll star. -- G. Hirst

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