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Comment: Re:New Microsoft CEO (Score 1) 128

by Princeofcups (#47523669) Attached to: Internet Explorer Vulnerabilities Increase 100%

Microsoft switch IE to use components written by someone else?

I place the likelihood of that as pretty small.

Microsoft have always had a huge case of "Not Invented Here", and I don't see that changing.

Considering that IE is based on Mosaic, SQLServer is based on Sybase, etc. etc., I don't think Microsoft has ever really "invented anything here."

Comment: Re:Packet radio (Score 1) 59

by Princeofcups (#47522545) Attached to: How the Internet of Things Could Aid Disaster Response

And how, way I ask, does packet radio not accomplish the same thing, across considerably larger distances than a peer-to-peer mesh network? The mesh isn't useless, but at some point it still needs to connect to some place with proper connectivity. This may not be within the range of the Internet of Things.

Because it only works if every device has a pingable IP. Or some such nonsense.

Comment: Re:At fucking last (Score 1) 186

by rsmith-mac (#47518779) Attached to: Firefox 33 Integrates Cisco's OpenH264

No, since Firefox is currently limiting the use of this plugin to WebRTC - which basically means it's not available for anything actual users want to do, such as watch html5 video.

Thankfully, that is incorrect. The OpenH.264 decoder can be used for HTML video elements. Though the last I heard Mozilla is still working on AAC audio licensing.

https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2013/10/30/video-interoperability-on-the-web-gets-a-boost-from-ciscos-h-264-codec/

Firefox already supports H.264 for the video element using platform codecs where they are available, but as noted in my last blog post on the topic, not all OSes ship with H.264 included. Provided we can get AAC audio decoders to match, using Cisco's OpenH264 binary modules allows us to extend support to other platforms and uses of H.264.

Comment: Re:My SSD already encrpyts its contents (Score 1) 91

by rsmith-mac (#47518249) Attached to: Intel Launches Self-Encrypting SSD

Exactly. Mainstream PC SSDs have been self-encrypting for a couple of years now; in Intel's case they've supported full disk encryption since the SSD 320 released in 2011. This is both to allow the easy use of encryption on the end-user side (ATA password), but it also makes it easy to wipe the drive without immediately zeroing out pages, as you have noted.

Comment: Re:n/t (Score 2, Insightful) 278

by Princeofcups (#47467611) Attached to: The debate over climate change is..

Newton is a good example. We know for a fact that his 'laws' (or more accurately, models) of motion are wrong. We've known that for a very long time (that is why relativity was needed, Newton's model, for example, failed to predict the orbits of the planets accurately).

That statement is one of the problems. Scientific laws are never right or wrong. That implies an absolute truth. Physics is just looking for math to accurately describe repeatable physical phenomena. Measurement is never absolute, so there is always an implied N decimal points of accuracy. And Newtons laws work 100% in the realm in which the experiments are performed. That's why we call them laws. If you want to set up experiments in other realms, e.g. high speed atomic particles, of course you might need different math to describe it.

Comment: Re:It's only fair (Score 1) 147

If those folks could just pick up a cheap Areo subscription

There won't be any such thing as a cheap Aereo subscription though.

Once Aereo starts paying broadcasters their requested fees their product will cost as much as any basic cable subscription, because the bulk of the cost of the service is the content, and Aereo needs to cover service costs and make a profit on top of that. Aereo's entire business plan (from a revenue standpoint) was based on using OTA provisions to cut out the content costs, making their only cost the service itself. The SCOTUS ruling has put an end to that.

Aereo can "win" in as much as they may be able to force the networks to negotiate with them, but that's it. And TFS got something very wrong here: the 1996 cable reforms mean that the rates are de facto set by the networks and not the government. The older statutory royalties provisions will not apply here; for various reasons this is not how business is done today, and every last cable company is now paying rates set by negotiations.

Consequently Aereo's backup plan of simply paying less than the cable companies for the same content will also fall flat on its face. They are going to pay full price, the same as anyone else, and they're going to need to find a way to structure their business around it to make it viable. Otherwise, to invoke XKCD, this is the copyright equivalent of thinking you can protect a laptop from the government with encryption. Aereo will simply get wrenched; this isn't a battle that can be won with legal tricks, as evidenced by the SCOTUS ruling.

Comment: Re:more leisure time for humans! (Score 1) 530

by Princeofcups (#47408551) Attached to: Foxconn Replacing Workers With Robots

Apple doesn't need the money at all, while the poor starve to death. That makes Apple and other companies like Apple the most despicable group of people on Earth. It isn't just Tim Cook or Jeff Bezos or Larry Page. Companies are made by people and every single person working at Apple is contributing to the problem.

Google is bigger than Apple now, so you can throw your hate that way. Or are you just another irrational Apple hater? Rhetorical.

The economy depends about as much on economists as the weather does on weather forecasters. -- Jean-Paul Kauffmann

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