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Submission + - Magnetic sensors to offer low-power answer to full-body wireless communication->

An anonymous reader writes: A team of electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego, has presented its findings on a new technology which can pass magnetic signals through the human body, offering an advancement for wireless communication between wearable devices [http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/news_releases/release.sfe?id=1807]. The technique, which has been successfully demonstrated, could provide an alternative to existing wireless technologies, providing a lower-power and more secure way of communicating information than Bluetooth for example.
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Feed Google News Sci Tech: Ashley Madison created 70000 'fembots' to talk to men looking for affairs - Daily Mail->


Daily Mail

Ashley Madison created 70000 'fembots' to talk to men looking for affairs
Daily Mail
Adultery website Ashley Madison has 5.5million female members - not 12,000 as originally claimed - and 770,000 of them are looking for lesbian affairs, an investigation has found. The new report, which admitted its previous analysis of hacked data was...
Ashley Madison says site growingSky News Australia
Ashley Madison owner says website still adding users after data hackBusiness Today
Adultery website Ashley Madison insists it's not shutting downIBNLive
The Indian Express
all 707 news articles

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Submission + - LILO Bootloader Development To End->

An anonymous reader writes: For any longtime Linux users, you probably remember the LILO bootloader from Linux distributions of many years ago. This bootloader has been in development since the 90's but development is finally ending. A homepage message reads, "I plan to finish development of LILO at 12/2015 because of some limitations (e.g. with BTFS, GPT, RAID). If someone want to develop this nice software further, please let me know ..."
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Submission + - TV Execs Say There is Simply Too Much New Programming on Television

HughPickens.com writes: John Koblin writes in the NYT that there’s a malaise in TV these days that’s felt among executives, viewers and critics, and it’s the result of one thing: There is simply too much on television. John Landgraf, chief executive of FX Networks, reported at the Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour that the total number of original scripted series on TV in 2014 was 371 and will surpass 400 in 2015. The glut, according to Landgraf, has presented “a huge challenge in finding compelling original stories and the level of talent needed to sustain those stories.” Michael Lombardo, president of programming at HBO. says it is harder than ever to build an audience for a show when viewers are confronted with so many choices and might click away at any moment. “I hear it all the time,” says Lombardo. “People going, ‘I can’t commit to another show, and I don’t have the time to emotionally commit to another show.’ I hear that, and I’m aware of it, and I get it.” Another complication is that shows not only compete against one another, but also against old series that live on in the archives of Amazon, Hulu or Netflix. So a new season of “Scandal,” for example, is also competing against old series like “The Wire.” "The amount of competition is just literally insane," says Landgraf.

Others point out that the explosion in programming has created more opportunity for shows with diverse casts and topics, such as “Jane the Virgin,” “Transparent” and “Orange Is the New Black.” Marti Noxon, the showrunner for Lifetime’s “UnREAL” and Bravo’s “Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce,” says there has been a “sea change” in the last five years. “I couldn’t have gotten those two shows on TV five years ago,” says Noxon. “There was not enough opportunity for voices that speak to a smaller audience. Now many of these places are looking to reach some people — not all the people. That’s opened up a tremendous opportunity for women and other people that have been left out of the conversation.”

Submission + - Rare Replay's Harsh Lesson for Other Remakes

SlappingOysters writes: With so many remakes and remasters flooding the market, Rare Replay offers a refreshingly respectful and bountiful timeline of one of gaming's most talented developers. This in-depth article examines what works and what doesn't with reissues of classic video games during an important time for the market, just ahead of the update that will add over 100 backwards compatible games to the Xbox One library.

Submission + - Shape-shifting Navigation Device Points You in the Right Direction->

Zothecula writes: Even in today's GPS-enabled world, asking someone to point you in the right direction can often be easier than wrestling with your smartphone. Enter the Animotus, a wirelessly-connected, 3D printed cube that acts like a sort of haptic compass. Developed by Yale engineer Adam Spiers, the device literally changes shape to point you in the right direction.
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Space

World's Most Powerful Digital Camera Sees Construction Green Light 67

An anonymous reader writes: The Department of Energy has approved the construction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telecscope's 3.2-gigapixel digital camera, which will be the most advanced in the world. When complete the camera will weigh more than three tons and take such high resolution pictures that it would take 1,500 high-definition televisions to display one of them. According to SLAC: "Starting in 2022, LSST will take digital images of the entire visible southern sky every few nights from atop a mountain called Cerro Pachón in Chile. It will produce a wide, deep and fast survey of the night sky, cataloging by far the largest number of stars and galaxies ever observed. During a 10-year time frame, LSST will detect tens of billions of objects—the first time a telescope will observe more galaxies than there are people on Earth – and will create movies of the sky with unprecedented details. Funding for the camera comes from the DOE, while financial support for the telescope and site facilities, the data management system, and the education and public outreach infrastructure of LSST comes primarily from the National Science Foundation (NSF)."
Earth

3 Category 4 Hurricanes Develop In the Pacific At Once For the First Time 244

Kristine Lofgren writes: For the first time in recorded history, three Category 4 hurricanes were seen in the Pacific Ocean at the same time. Climatologists have been warning that climate change may produce more extreme weather situations, and this may be a peek at the future to come. Eric Blake, a specialist with the National Hurricane Center summed it up with a tweet: "Historic central/eastern Pacific outbreak- 3 major hurricanes at once for the first time on record!"
Programming

The Most Important Obscure Languages? 362

Nerval's Lobster writes: If you're a programmer, you're knowledgeable about "big" languages such as Java and C++. But what about those little-known languages you only hear about occasionally? Which ones have an impact on the world that belies their obscurity? Erlang (used in high-performance, parallel systems) springs immediately to mind, as does R, which is relied upon my mathematicians and analysts to crunch all sorts of data. But surely there are a handful of others, used only by a subset of people, that nonetheless inform large and important platforms that lots of people rely upon... without realizing what they owe to a language that few have ever heard of.

Submission + - The Most Important Obscure Languages? ->

Nerval's Lobster writes: If you’re a programmer, you’re knowledgeable about “big” languages such as Java and C++. But what about those little-known languages (Dice link) you only hear about occasionally? Which ones have an impact on the world that belies their obscurity? Erlang (used in high-performance, parallel systems) springs immediately to mind, as does R, which is relied upon my mathematicians and analysts to crunch all sorts of data. But surely there are a handful of others, used only by a subset of people, that nonetheless inform large and important platforms that lots of people rely upon... without realizing what they owe to a language that few have ever heard of.
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Submission + - Book review: Effective Python (59 specific ways to write better Python)

MassDosage writes: If you are familiar with the “Effective” style of books then you probably already know how this book is structured. If not here’s a quick primer: the book consists of a number of small sections each of which focus on a specific problem, issue or idea and these are discussed in a “here’s the best way to do X” manner. These sections are grouped into related chapters but can be read in pretty much any order and generally don’t depend on each other (and when they do this will be called out in the text). The idea is that you can read the book from cover to cover if you want but you can also just dip in and out and read only the sections that are of interest to you. This also means that you can use the book as a reference in future when you inevitably forget the details or want to double check something.

Effective Python stays true to this ethos and delivers 59 (not 60, nope, not 55) but 59 specific ways to write better Python. These are logically grouped into chapters covering broader conceptual topics like “Pythonic thinking”, general technical features like “Concurrency and parallelism” as well as nitty gritty language details like “Meta classes and attributes”. The range of topics is excellent and cover relevant aspects of the language that I’d imagine pretty much any developer will encounter at some point while developing Python programs. Even though there is no required order to reading the various sections if you want to read the book from cover to cover it’s organised in such a way that you can do this. It starts off with getting your head around coding in Python before moving on to specifics of the language and then ending with advice on collaboration and setting up and running Python programs in production environments.

I really enjoyed the author’s approach to each of the topics covered. He explains each item in a very thorough and considered manner with plenty of detail but manages to do this while still being clear and concise. Where relevant he describes multiple ways of achieving a goal while contrasting the pros and cons of various alternative solutions, ending off with what he considers the preferred approach. The reader can then make up their own mind based on the various options which applies best in a given situation instead of just being given one solution. The author clearly understand the internals of the Python language and the philosophy behind some of the design decisions that have resulted in certain features. This means that instead of just offering a solution he also gives you the context and reasoning behind things which I found made it a lot easier to understand. The discussions and reasoning feel balanced and informed by the experience of a developer who has been doing this “in the trenches” for years as opposed to someone in an ivory tower issuing dictats which sound good in theory but don’t actually work in the real world. The vast majority of the topics are illustrated through code samples which are built on and modified at each stage along the way to a final solution. This gives the reader something practical they can take away and use and experiment with and clearly shows how something is done. The code samples are easily comprehensible with just enough code to demonstrate a point but not so much that you get distracted by unnecessary additions.

While most of the topics are Python specific plenty of the best practices and advice apply equally well to other programming languages. For example in one section the author recommends resisting some of the brevity offered by the Python where this can lead to unreadable code that is hard to understand but the same could be said of writing code in many other languages (I’m looking at you, Perl). This also applies to a section related to choosing the best data structure for the problem at hand — if you end up nesting Maps within Maps in your code then you’re probably doing something wrong regardless of the language. Still, the main focus here is Python and the author does not shy away from going deep into technical details so you’ll definitely need some knowledge of the language and ideally some experience using it in order to get the most out of it.

Effective Python is not a book for complete newbies to Python and I think it’s suited more to intermediate users of the language wanting to take their skills to the next level or advanced programmers who might need some fresh takes on the way they do things. The subjects and opinions in this book could either convince you to do something differently or reassure you of the reasons why you’re already doing things a certain way (external affirmation that you’re right is also useful at times!) I’m no Python expert but I found the book drew me in and kept my attention and I certainly learnt a lot which will come in handy the next time I put on my Pythonista hat and do some Python coding. Highly recommended.

Full disclosure: I was given a copy of this book free of charge by the publisher for review purposes. They placed no restrictions on what I could say and left me to be as critical as I wanted so the above review is my own honest opinion.

Submission + - Cities Wasting Millions of Taxpayer's Money in Failed IoT Pilots->

dkatana writes: Two years ago at the Smart Cities Expo World Congress, Antoni Vives, then Barcelona’s second deputy mayor, said he refused to have more technology pilots in the city: “I hate pilots, if anyone of you [technology companies] comes to me selling a pilot, just get away, I don’t want to see you.” He added, “I am fed up with the streets full of devices. It is a waste of time, a waste of money, and doesn’t deliver anything; it is just for the sake of selling something to the press and it does not work.”

Barcelona is already a leading city in the use of IoT and, according to Fortune, “The most wired city in the world”. Over the past 10 years, the city has experienced a surge in the number of sensors, data collection devices and automation and has become “a showcase for the smart metropolis of the future”.

Over the past few years technology companies have sold pilot programs costing millions of dollars to cities all over the world, claiming it will enhance their “Smart City” rating. Unfortunately, after the initial buzz, many of those pilots never get beyond the evaluation stage and are abandoned because the cities cannot afford them in the first place.

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Submission + - Red Fireworks Go Green->

An anonymous reader writes: Makers of fireworks and flares have long believed that the beautiful red color in their explosions could be attained only with chlorine-based compounds. But after these ingredients combust, they can transform into cancer-causing chemicals that then fall to the ground. New chlorine-free pyrotechnics could pave the way for a generation of red fireworks and flares that are better for the environment and for people’s health.

Chemists formulated the new explosive by replacing polyvinyl chloride on the old ingredient list with either hexamine, a preservative in citrus washing solutions, or 5-amino-1H-tetrazole, an air-bag propellant.

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In a five year period we can get one superb programming language. Only we can't control when the five year period will begin.

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