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Comment: That sucks (Score 1) 552

by jameshofo (#47075629) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Communication With Locked-in Syndrome Patient?
Well I'm a little disappointed in the narrow-minded responses of "just pull the plug". Regardless, I understand its just a TV show, House did an episode with a patient in locked in syndrome. Episode 5x19 in that they used a brain computer interface, that looks like it took a lot of effort for little return. If it was me I would start asking the doctors to do deep brain stimulation or ECT, in hopes that electricity can help open up some of the damaged passageways. There is a good tech talk about how ECT is used here. Realistically her brain is probably going to have to learn to re-wire and understand how it needs to communicate with the rest of the body again.

Best of luck!
GUI

Apple: Dumb As a Patent Trolling Fox On iPhone Prior Art? 408

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the catching-up-with-the-80s dept.
theodp (442580) writes "GeekWire reports that a Microsoft researcher's 1991 video could torpedo Apple's key 'slide to unlock' patent, one of 5 patents that the iPhone maker cited in its demand for $40 per Samsung phone. Confronted with what appears to be damning video evidence of prior art that pre-dates its 'invention' by more than a decade, Apple has reportedly argued that the sliding on/off switch demoed by Catherine Plaisant is materially different than the slide to unlock switch that its 7 inventors came up with. Apple's patent has already been deemed invalid in Europe because of similar functionality present in the Swedish Neonode N1M." The toggle widgets demoed in the video (attached below) support sliding across the toggle to make it more difficult to swap state (preventing accidental toggling). The video itself is worth a watch — it's interesting to see modern UIs adopting some of the idioms that testing in the early 90s showed were awful (e.g. Gtk+ 3's state toggles).

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