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Submission + - America's First Video Game Museum is Leveling up ( 2

martiniturbide writes: Did you ever dreamed of a Museum where you can take your kid and show him/her what you used to play when young? Yes? No? Who cares? Today I found out that this museum exists and it is called “The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment (MADE)” at Oakland, California. This is non-profit videogame museum that preserves old games, has playable exhibitions, give free classes to learn to code using Scratch and host several kinds of gaming events. This museum has over 5,000 games and over 100 consoles and computers and hosted free classes for more than 400 students. Now they are launching a Kickstarter campaign because they need a bigger space.

Submission + - 9th-Grader May Face Charges after Homemade Clock Mistaken for Bomb (

bengoerz writes: 14-year-old Ahmed Mohamed was led away from MacArthur High School in handcuffs and faces possible charges after teachers, school administrators, and police in Irving, Texas mistook his homemade clock for a bomb. The device — a circuit board, power supply, and digital display wired together inside a pencil box — was confiscated by a teacher after the alarm sounded in class. Despite telling everyone who would listen that his device was just a clock, Ahmed was confronted by 4 police officers, suspended for 3 days, and threatened with expulsion unless he made a written statement, before eventually being transported to a juvenile detention center to meet his parents.

Submission + - Saturn's Moon Enceladus Has Global Subsurface Ocean

An anonymous reader writes: NASA's Cassini probe has made another fascinating discovery: Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons, has an underground ocean across the entire globe. Researchers were trying to explain why the moon wobbles as it orbits Saturn, and they eventually came to the conclusion that its outer shell must be completely detached from its core. "The mechanisms that might have prevented Enceladus' ocean from freezing remain a mystery. Thomas and his colleagues suggest a few ideas for future study that might help resolve the question, including the surprising possibility that tidal forces due to Saturn's gravity could be generating much more heat within Enceladus than previously thought."

Submission + - Free Content Might Violate Agency's 'Internet Conduct Standard' (

JustAnotherOldGuy writes: FCC Commissioner Ajit Varadaraj Pai said mobile content such as music that some service providers exempt from data limits could be in violation of the agency’s new Internet conduct standard. Pai cited T-Mobile’s music freedom program as an example. “If you are a T-Mobile wireless customer and you have a data cap you might think, ‘well, I have to be careful about how I consume data.’ Well, T-Mobile has a program called music freedom, which exempts certain programs like Spotify and Pandora from those data caps, so if you listen to a bunch of songs when you are walking around that content does not count against your data cap,” Pai said during an Internet regulation discussion hosted by the Federalist Society.

Submission + - The first "Unification" attempt was Maxwell, 150 years ago

StartsWithABang writes: When we think of our origin story — the origin of everything in the Universe — many of us think of, “let there be light!” This is true whether you consider the Big Bang origins of our Universe or the biblical stories we’ve told for thousands of years, yet few of us pause to consider what the phenomenon of light actually is. We take for granted, today, that it’s an electromagnetic wave, yet this was only determined by James Clerk Maxwell in 1865: exactly 150 years ago. A few decades later, the first trans-Atlantic radio transmission took place, turning this theoretical novelty into one of the most powerful technological tools ever developed.

Submission + - Stroller Recalled after Toddlers Get Fingers Chopped Off

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "CBS News reports that three children have accidentally chopped off a fingertip because of a fault with their stroller and two adults have reported smashing or cutting their fingers after they got a finger jammed in a hinge mechanism used to adjust handlebars on Kolcraft Contours Options products. The recall is similar to a recall of 1 million Maclaren strollers that was reissued last year after at least 37 more children have injured since the recall, including five who lose their fingertips, the US. Consumer Product Safety Commission said. The Maclaren recall highlights the continuing problem of consumers using strollers for an extended period of time, including buying them secondhand where it is typically harder to know a product has been recalled since the date of original purchase isn't usually known and the owner is less likely to know model numbers and place of purchase. The CPSC also says it knows of 30 deaths since 1980 of a child to getting trapped between a stroller's tray or grab bar and the seat bottom. The original recall was a nightmare for Maclaren. "Given the higher order of sensitivity, parents are much more diligent, They want to talk to friends, family and even strangers about their decisions. They'll go the extra distance." says Pete Blackshaw, a brand consultant for Nielsen Online adding that new mothers are three times more likely than others to use social media and start blogs. "Anything relative to child safety tends to be off-the-charts viral.""

Submission + - Eric Raymond on why Stallman is a dangerous fanatic (

Frosty Piss writes: According to Eric Raymond, 'RMS made an early decision to frame his advocacy as a moral crusade rather than a pragmatic argument about engineering practices and outcomes. While he made consequentialist arguments against closed source (and still does) his rhetoric and his thinking became dominated by terms like “evil”, to the point where he repeatedly alienated potential allies both with his absolutism and his demand that anyone cooperating with him share it.' Raymond goes on to say, 'By the late 1990s, after having observed RMS’s behavior for more than a decade, I had long since concluded that the Free Software Foundation’s moralistic rhetoric was serving us badly. The problem with it is the same problem with messianic religions in general; for people who are not flipped into true-believer mode by any given one, it will come off as at best creepy and insular, at worst nutty and potentially dangerous (and this remains true even for people attached to a different messianic religion).'

Submission + - Japan restarts two of their 50 nuclear reactors ( 1

Darth_brooks writes: "Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda ordered the restart of two idle nuclear reactors Saturday, amid split public response. The Japanese government is trying to fill a summer power shortfall. According to the article, the two reactors supply power to the Kansai region near Osaka, where local officials were predicting a 15% shortfall in power capacity during July and August."

Submission + - Black Death Discovered In Oregon (

redletterdave writes: "The Black Death, a strain of bubonic plague that destroyed nearly a third of Europe's entire population between 1347 and 1369, has been found in Oregon. Health officials in Portland have confirmed that a man contracted the plague after getting bitten by a cat. The unidentified man, who is currently in his 50s, had tried to pry a dead mouse from a stray cat's mouth on June 2 when the cat attacked him. Days later, fever and sickness drove the man to check himself into Oregon's St. Charles Medical Center, where he is currently in "critical condition.""

Submission + - Will Sweden hand Julian Assange over to the United States? (

An anonymous reader writes: Digital Journal has the following on the ongoing Assange case: 'Now that Julian Assange's appeal against extradition has failed, fears are that he will then be shipped on from Sweden to the U.S.A. [....] He is due to be extradited to Sweden in two weeks, where he is wanted for questioning over allegations of sexual assault and rape. It is feared that once in Sweden, he is likely to be sent on to the U.S.A. The U.S. Government has apparently issued a secret, closed indictment against Assange. Because of this he will be branded a terrorist and a fair trial seems very unlikely should he be sent to the U.S.A. [... ] STRATFOR's Fred Burton for example was caught writing the following about Assange in an internal email that Wikileaks got its hands on some time ago: "Assange is going to make a nice bride in prison. Screw the terrorist. He’ll be eating cat food forever." [...] The question all this raises is: Is there a planned effort underway to ship Assange to Sweden, and ship him right on to the United States, where he would then face serious charges ranging from "illegal espionage" to "leaking classified documents to the public" to "acts of treason committed against the United States"? To put it a bit more bluntly: is there an organized plan underway to send Assange to the U.S. via Sweden, and possibly put him behind bars for the rest of his life, and are the people who have drafted this plan now merely going through to the motions of moving Julian Assange from Point A (Britain) to Point B (United States), where a cruel fate awaits him?

Truly simple systems... require infinite testing. -- Norman Augustine