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Comment: Not compliant with vi, even (Score 1) 146

by jabberw0k (#49030491) Attached to: Building the Developer's Dream Keyboard
Mod+J on this keyboard is left arrow whereas every programmer since ASCII started (1963) knows Ctrl+J is linefeed (cursor down), and Ctrl+H is backspace (cursor left). Certainly at least since the ADM-3A (1975) and the vi editor, (left,down,up,right) have been (H,J,K,L) yet this keyboard's modifiers give you those on (J,K,I,L) instead? Huh?

Comment: It's the twenty-first century (Score 2) 165

by jabberw0k (#47666807) Attached to: Why the Public Library Beats Amazon

You and Joe Biden ought to check your calendars; it's been the 21st century for well over a decade now.

Also, real libraries have old and out-of-print books, rare books, maps, art collections, local publications and artifacts, and plenty of things that are highly unlikely ever to be digitized, or which history -- and historians! -- demand be kept for the public good. In this information age, we need librarians more than ever. Get rid of libraries and you scrap civilization itself.

Comment: Do Internet Years Really Exist (Score 1) 39

by jabberw0k (#47608933) Attached to: Interviews: Ask Tim O'Reilly About a Life Steeped In Technology
We hear so much about "Internet Years" and how the pace of innovation has increased so dramatically. Yet from the first TRS-80 to the end of the CP/M era was barely five years, and in that time a vast numbers of magazines and books were written and printed. Today, meanwhile, major software components like Moose, Perl's object-oriented makeover, have been around for over six years and still no O'Reilly book is yet on the horizon. In your estimation, is the major problem to new publications really the speed of innovation, or the increaing dilution of the market from it becoming vastly broader?

Comment: Stallman was right (Score 5, Insightful) 101

by jabberw0k (#47538223) Attached to: Private Data On iOS Devices Not So Private After All

These so-called "smart telephones" aren't telephones at all; they are computers. Computers that you cannot control. And if you aren't, who is?

Some folks thought Richard Stallman was crazy for saying no-one should run software or use hardware that is based on clandestine (proprietary, hidden) knowledge. This latest revelation is just one reason he was right all along.

Comment: Those complaints aren't about telephone features (Score 1) 291

by jabberw0k (#47501153) Attached to: Why My LG Optimus Cellphone Is Worse Than It's Supposed To Be

Telephones are devices that let you speak to someone (tele-, far; and phone-, sound).

The real mystery is why anyone who has the slightest clue about technology, would buy or wish to use a computer that runs software you cannot control or replace. Even the TRS-80 let you shut off the built-in Microsoft BASIC ROM, and the Apple ][ let you run something other than Integer BASIC. These allegedly "smart" so-called "telephones" seem quite brain-dead.

The sooner you make your first 5000 mistakes, the sooner you will be able to correct them. -- Nicolaides

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