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Comment: Tried Before; Doesn't Work (Score 1) 364

by jaa101 (#46645353) Attached to: Your Car Will Tell You How To Hit the Next Green Light

This was trailed years ago in Melbourne Australia. As you approach the lights signs advise driving 60, 50, 40, etc. as appropriate but sometimes, show no speed. Drivers quickly learn that this means they need to speed to catch the lights ... so they do. Police don't like this so the trial is killed. There's no way to show legal speeds in a way that drivers can't figure out when it's best for them to speed. This can't work until we're all driving automated vehicles that set their own speed.

Comment: Finland is in the EU (Score 1) 252

If it's the police initiating this then they must feel it's a criminal matter and so extradition becomes a possibility, and Finland is part of the EU. If they want to play hard ball then Jimmy might have to cut down on visits to Europe because, once he's there, it will be European courts who get to decide who has jurisdiction.

Comment: Plasma: better picture, worse choice (Score 1) 202

by jaa101 (#45296973) Attached to: Panasonic Announces an End To Plasma TVs In March

It's clear to me that plasmas give better quality image but I still choose LCD. The plasma issue of burn-in is the main worry but they're also more power hungry and heavy too. Plasmas easily beat LCDs for black levels, colour accuracy, response time and viewing angles but LCDs are good enough. Even if my kids didn't spend hours playing video games I know somehow there would be burn-in and then I'd want to buy a new set ... which is just a waste. Plasma being the losing technology is not all down to marketing.

Comment: Cars Float, Submarines Sink (Score 2) 91

by jaa101 (#45170639) Attached to: Elon Musk Making a Working Version of James Bond's Submersible Car

The fundamental engineering problem here is that cars float and submarines sink. Ballasting that car with enough weight so it's close to neutrally buoyant will ensure it performs nothing like a sports car on the road. This is the kind of issue that made lead acid batteries such a great choice for submarines in the first place.

The best approach is going to involve minimising the volume where water is excluded, i.e., ensuring that as much of the vehicle is flooded by water as possible when it dives. At least, as a sports car, the interior is very small so they may have a chance of making it work.

Comment: Re:Latency, latency, latency! (Score 1) 445

by jaa101 (#44247933) Attached to: Dropbox Wants To Replace Your Hard Disk

Just because a file is shared with Dropbox doesn't mean that accesses involve a network round-trip to their servers. The files are still stored locally (on an SSD if you have one) and only synchronised when a change is made on another machine. Dropbox is not the same as a Windows "network drive" over SMB/CIFS or Linux NFS.

Comment: Re:This shouldn't be necessary (Score 2) 262

by jaa101 (#43848081) Attached to: Texas Poised To Pass Unprecedented Email Privacy Bill
Apparently the trick in progress here is that people already gave their email to someone else, namely their service provider. The legal logic is that this borks their expectation of privacy, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katz_v._United_States from 1967. One might hope SOTUS will revisit their decision in the light of the current state of technology but until they do you're stuck relying on legislative protect rather than constitutional.
Australia

+ - Facebook Won't Take Down Undercover Cop Page in Australia->

Submitted by
jaa101
jaa101 writes "Facebook has refused a request from Australian police to take down a page with details of undercover police vehicles saying saying it cannot stop people taking photos in public places. The original story is at http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/facebook-page-reveals-details-of-unmarked-police-cars/story-e6frf7kx-1226499939251 (paywall) but it doesn't give a link to the relevant page which seems to be at https://www.facebook.com/pages/VIC-Undercover-Police-Cars/131769163636069?ref=ts&fref=ts . This page for the state of Victoria has 12000 likes but a similar page for the state of Queensland has over 34000 at https://www.facebook.com/pages/QLD-undercover-police-cars/173981759325151?ref=ts&fref=ts and there are other Australian pages too."
Link to Original Source
Apple

+ - Apple kicks Java out of browsers in OSX update->

Submitted by
SternisheFan
SternisheFan writes "An Apple update released Wednesday removes the Java browser plug-in in all Mac-compatible browsers. The move puts even more daylight between Apple and Oracle, as the latter struggles with security flaws and the former seeks to eliminate its dependence on crucial software updates from third parties. Apple's update came one day after Oracle issued its own Java patch. That's a much better turnaround time than earlier this year when Oracle issued a patch in February 2012 that Apple didn't push out until April. Users who update will need to reinstall Oracle's version of Java if they wish to run Java applets in their browser. But for the majority of Internet users, the update will go unnoticed.
    In fact, many security experts and blogs suggest that users who don't use Java on a regular basis disable it in their browsers or uninstall it altogether. This mitigates the risk of infection from malicious applets that seek to infect, harm or control victims' machines."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Not Really Freefall (Physics Lesson) (Score 3, Informative) 192

by jaa101 (#40772793) Attached to: Skydiver Leaps From 18 Miles Up In 'Space Jump' Practice

Freefall strictly speaking means 9.8m/s/s which, after 228 seconds, multiplies out to 5000mph. That's an order of magnitude more than Baumgartner's speed. Wikipedia explains:

"The example of a falling skydiver who has not yet deployed a parachute is not considered free fall from a physics perspective, since they experience a drag force which equals their weight once they have achieved terminal velocity (see below). However, the term "free fall skydiving" is commonly used to describe this case in everyday speech, and in the skydiving community."

Still, terminal velocity for a human at sea level is about 120mph which is 4.5 times slower than the quoted 536mph. Taking the square root gives an atmospheric pressure 2.1 times less than normal which translates to him popping the 'chute at about 25,000. Actually he had a pressure suit which would probably slow him down so it could have been higher than that.

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