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Comment: Re:iPad traffic (Score 1) 1052

by j_snare (#41316465) Attached to: Apple Announces iPhone 5

Ahh well. Bad joke is bad, and my imagination isn't what it used to be. Evident in the fact that I apparently need to explain why I had that reaction initially...

That said, my initial reaction upon reading that was really to hear that 68% of the systems were sending 91% of all TCP/IP packets. Yes, I realized that wasn't actually true, and yes, I realized that it's likely because they're being used more. But all told, if you had 100 people performing a task, 68 of them with iPads, and 32 of them with some other tablet device, yet 91% of the network traffic came from the 68 iPads, most people would rate that sort of efficiency as poor.

In reality, yes, it's likely just because the people who own iPads are actually using them more, whereas other tablet owners may only use them in certain cases. To be perfectly honest, that's actually more along the lines of what I've really seen around me as well. Most co-workers seem to be of the "I use my iPad all the time" camp, or of the feeling "I don't really need a tablet". I see that as a loss for the current competitors to the iPad...

Sorry to confuse you by having an initial reaction that wasn't an actual analysis.

Comment: Not another "pull Cat5 via Coax" Post (Score 1) 608

by Lookin4Trouble (#31187572) Attached to: Suggestions For a Coax-To-Ethernet Solution?
Would not recommend using the coax as a solder hack-job to RJ45 connectors. Running all new cabling is easy provided you have the proper tools (flashlight, fish tape/rod, box of cable, cordless drill, long drill bit 3/8-1/2" head, box of draw-string, and a helper)

Do yourself a big favor, and when you pull in your shiny new ethernet, tie in some drawstrings so you never have to repeat the process.

Comment: $7/Watt for Now (Score 1, Insightful) 622

by mdsolar (#31168750) Attached to: US To Build Nuclear Power Plants
The apparent cost of the project is $7/Watt http://www.nytimes.com/cwire/2010/02/17/17climatewire-doe-delivers-its-first-long-awaited-nuclear-71731.html with Japan providing other loan guarantees. Since Japan has been escalating pricing for the South Texas project, we can guess the same will happen in this case. I'd guess that $14/Watt is about where this will end up, completely uneconomical. The loans will default and the taxpayers will pay.

Comment: Re:I love to be the first to say this... (Score 1) 787

by azav (#31168730) Attached to: Utah Assembly Passes Resolution Denying Climate Change

True. And people don't know that. What people also need to understand is that with global warming, weather patterns shift. As Texas and DC just got through a snowstorm, the Olympics in Canada are almost without snow.

One day of weather does not = 15 or 20 years of weather trends. People need to know that.

Comment: Re:Race? (Score 0) 554

by shutdown -p now (#31166664) Attached to: Google, Apple Call Workers' Race & Gender Trade Secrets

I'm baffled, too, that a civilized country in the twenty first century can still use an outdated, archaic, and downright offensive concept such as "race" for any purpose, much less on government level. Nonetheless, so far as I can tell, it's kept tracked on many levels in US, mainly to implement "affirmative action" policies.

After all, to right the wrongs against blacks, you must first determine which of your citizens are black, and which are not - so you know who's the advantaged party, and who is declared a scapegoat for past discriminations

Comment: Re:Doesn't anyone realize that (Score 1) 355

by selven (#31163962) Attached to: Cellulosic Biofuel Finally Ready For the Road

Don't reduce the number, reduce the size. Every time I see a road I see 90% of the cars with one driver and three empty seats. Taking out the back seats would really help (Smart car: 3.3 litres / 100 km, compared to 5-6 litres (the hybrids) and 9 litres (normal cars)). Motorcycles are a heavy sacrifice on comfort and safety but they go down to 2 litres. Think of the traffic congestion problems that some healthy downsizing would also fix (no idling, even more fuel economy!).

Comment: Re:Kindle (Score 1) 684

by j_snare (#31149118) Attached to: It's 2010; What's the Best E-Reader?

The Sony Daily Edition has wireless capability, the ability to download periodicals and new content with or without a computer, a touchscreen and most importantly it's not a DRM laden POS locking you in to one bookstore.

You know, I see this all the time on /. but I can't figure out why... Everyone talks about how much better these other readers are because you aren't locked to Amazon's store, but it's ridiculous. You're not locked to their store for the Kindle either. I think of it more like a homepage that I don't use.

Disclaimer: I have and love my Kindle v1. I've been using it for about a year now...

The only DRM laden stuff on my Kindle are the samples that I've gotten from Amazon to see how a book is, check formatting on Hitchhikers, etc... Everything else I've gotten from other bookstores or copied over myself.

Last I checked, TXT, HTML, and other extensions don't have DRM involved. I've got a couple PRC/MOBI formats and such, with no DRM, that I've gotten from several other bookstores. In fact, I'm reading through a series from Baen Library (several from the free library, and several from the paid) right now. Hell, Baen will actually send the books to your Kindle wirelessly at this point. I'm sure several of the other places will too (it just requires that you give them your Kindle's email address and enable your device to get emails from them on Amazon).

No, it doesn't have ePub, nor PDF, but I haven't found that to be an issue yet. PDFs either translate fine using the Mobi software, or they generally aren't good for e-readers anyway. I do have my issues with the Kindle, but DRM isn't really one of them... All in all, I'm extremely pleased with it, and it's re-"kindle"-d my reading to similar levels of when I was much younger. I am still able to sit out on the porch and read, or use it as a tour guide for an unfamiliar city.

Pohl's law: Nothing is so good that somebody, somewhere, will not hate it.

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