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Google

+ - Google's 2nd Android Developer Contest kicksoff 1

Submitted by coffeeisclassy
coffeeisclassy writes: Google's second Android Developer Contest (ADC2) has started, despite some confusion around how to submit applications. The prizes are different from the first ADC, with each category having prizes of 100k, 50k, and 25k and an overall best of 150k,50k and 25k, meaning the best Android application from ADC2 is eligible for ~250k. The rules seem to allow any application never published before August 1st to compete and is open through the end of August (so break out your keyboards!). The top prizes are certainly less than that of first ADC, but with the prizes broken down by category Google may be hoping to inspire some love for less popular categories. While some other developers are waiting to find out to submit, one developer has moved ahead and released one of there entires Pigs Can Fly Site Monitor (also on Google Market for those with Androids). So if you've been waiting for an excuse to start a new side-project, here you have it :)
The Internet

+ - Computer generated art from browser history

Submitted by iamthekingofthesees
iamthekingofthesees writes: A new site, web2.0collage.com, is using browser history to automatically generate collages of sites that people have visited. Before you get worried, it uses a white-list of safe for work sites, so the collage will be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. You can skip the privacy warnings and go straight through if you wish. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing.
Security

+ - Website hijacks browser history & makes collag

Submitted by itsamemario
itsamemario writes: With some basic javascript its possible to sniff a users browser history. A new browser history sniffing site uses this to generate a collage of the sites you visit. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot/blogging habits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing.
Privacy

+ - Sniffing browser history for awareness & art

Submitted by tdalek
tdalek writes: web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and then creates a collage of them. While the collage is kind of nifty, it also graphically illustrates just how easy it is for people to sniff your browser history. Before you get too worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habits). However, just because these people play nice is no guarantee that everyone else will. Other potential benign applications including customizing bookmark-lets, but the less than benign (say advertising or even hr site) implications or troublesome. An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For slashdotters not interested in warnings or explanations, you can jump straight to the browser history sniffing
The Internet

+ - Browser sniffing ninjas

Submitted by tasteyf00dninja
tasteyf00dninja writes: web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning & explanation screen and go straight to the browser history sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing.
Security

+ - The art of browser history sniffing

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: There is a new kid in town doing something a bit different. web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing.
Security

+ - Browser historry sniffing demoed by web2.0collage

Submitted by crazyirishhobo
crazyirishhobo writes: Browser history sniffing isn't the newest thing on the block, but web2.0collage.com takes a different approach to browser history sniffing. Once it's gotten a list of all the sites you visit it constructs a (somewhat creepy) collage graphically illustrating the websites you visit. Depending on your browser history the results can be nifty or creepy (fortunately it does use a filtered SFW list). While the results on it own are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing.
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Collages of sniffed browser history for !privacy

Submitted by hkarau
hkarau writes: web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and then creates a collage of them. While the collage is kind of nifty, it also graphically illustrates just how easy it is for people to sniff your browser history. Before you get too worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habits). However, just because these people play nice is no guarantee that everyone else will. Other potential benign applications including customizing bookmark-lets, but the less than benign (say advertising or even hr site) implications or troublesome. An interesting application of potentially scary technology.
The Internet

+ - Sniffing browser history for art

Submitted by
holdenkarau
holdenkarau writes: "You may remember previous slashdot discussions on browser history sniffing, but there is a new kid in town doing something a bit different. web2.0collage.com uses similar browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick."
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - web2.0collage uses sniffed browser history for art

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit (that has been discussed on slashdot before) and then creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology.
Security

+ - Security flaw in Yahoo mail exposes plaintext auth

Submitted by
holdenkarau
holdenkarau writes: "Yahoo!'s acquisition of opensource mail client Zimbra has apparently brought some baggage to the mail team. The new Yahoo! desktop program transmits the authentication information in plain text. Ironically enough, the flaw was discovered during a Yahoo "hacku" day at the University of Waterloo (the only Canadian school part of the trip). Compared to the recent hoopla about gmail exposing the names associated with accounts, this seems down right scary. So if you have friends or relatives who might have installed Yahoo! desktop and value their e-mail accounts, now would be a good time to get them to change the password and switch back to the oh so retro web interface."

You should never bet against anything in science at odds of more than about 10^12 to 1. -- Ernest Rutherford

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