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Comment: Re:Original M3800 Model Linux User Here (Score 1) 127

Bumblebee is straightforward to set-up when using the packages for Fedora. I have been using bumblebee on different laptops for the past 3 years now, the latest one being the XPS 15 9530 which is the same as the original M3800 (with a GeForce instead of a Quadro).

Comment: Re:For disasters (Score 1) 85

by iserlohn (#48036967) Attached to: Hong Kong Protesters Use Mesh Networks To Organize

Your post is insightful, but I have to disagree on your main point. HK politics is not about saving face. If it was, then CY would have been ousted long ago. HK leaders are propped up by Beijing, irrespective of the feeling of locals. There is no need to save face as their political reputation is not where they derive power from (unlike the politics inside the CPC).

My point is that the demands of the protesters, which will inevitably lead to Beijing losing face if they gave in, is the result of the different culture in Hong Kong. They are forcing China's leaders into a reality they are not comfortable with and what will happen is anybody's guess.

Just because that HKers by and large accept that sovereignty rests with Beijing doesn't mean that HKers respect the legitimacy of the government there. You said that it's not something they can do anything about, but this protest is in reality a direct challenge to Beijing - CY Leung is just a proxy!

Comment: Re:For disasters (Score 1) 85

by iserlohn (#48036459) Attached to: Hong Kong Protesters Use Mesh Networks To Organize

The next step will be the protesters blocking the government from functioning by blocking entrances to government buildings and facilities. The HK government will be partially paralysed and this will be the real test. CY Leung has already lost control of the situation and the narrative is definitely on the protesters side right now.

I have a feeling that this will end with the intervention of Beijing one way or another, which is what Bj is trying desperately to avoid. There is no scenario for the central government to get involved which will not damage them in some way. The fact that Mainland politics is really old-fashioned and based heavily on "saving face" compounds the difficulty. From the protesters point of view though, it is not their problem - A political apparatus that isn't flexible or modern is a fault of China, not Hong Kong. I think it is an excellent test for Beijing on how to deal with an educated, engaged and motivated populace that doesn't see any reason to respect its legitimacy, because it's not going to be the last time they need to deal with it, isn't it?

Comment: Re:For disasters (Score 1) 85

by iserlohn (#48034995) Attached to: Hong Kong Protesters Use Mesh Networks To Organize

A part of the problem is that the executive and other political appointees in power in HK is very much geared towards the appeasement of Beijing and will not confront them on the behalf of the people of HK.

The communist party has indicated that they will not take back a decree on the Chief Exec election (basically rigging and interference from Beijing on the nomination process, so you get to vote for a choice of 3 different puppets). That just shows how arrogant these politicians are in Beijing - and yet they accuse the students of not compromising.

Comment: Re:House of Lords? (Score 1) 282

by iserlohn (#47580047) Attached to: UK Government Report Recommends Ending Online Anonymity

Hum.. that was a bit confusing.. maybe to rephrase -

No, when the constitution was drawn up, it was not foreseen that Congress will vote to refuse to fund government (via refusing to issuing bonds) on things that Congress itself already approved to fund in the budget. This political point scoring shut down the federal government at the detriment to everybody.

This will never happen in a parliamentary system as 1. the legislature form the government, and 2. money bills failing to pass will automatically trigger new elections.

In fact, the founding fathers of the US already tried a weak central government under the Articles of Confederation. 8 years after full ratification of the Articles, it was replaced with the U.S. constitution that swung the balance of power to a federal government. This was because there was too much inter-state conflict and states refusing to honour their obligations under the articles.

Comment: Re:House of Lords? (Score 1) 282

by iserlohn (#47580043) Attached to: UK Government Report Recommends Ending Online Anonymity

No, when the constitution was drawn up, it did not foresee that Congress will vote to refuse to fund government (via refusing to issuing bonds) on things that Congress itself already approved to fund in the budget. This political point scoring shut down the federal government at the detriment of everybody.

In fact, the founding fathers of the US already tried a weak central government under the Articles of Confederation. 8 years after full ratification of the Articles, it was replaced with the U.S. constitution that swung the balance of power to a federal government. This was because there was too much inter-state conflict and states refusing to honour their obligations under the articles.

This will never happen in a parliamentary system as 1. the legislature form the government, and 2. money bills failing to pass will automatically trigger new elections.

Comment: Re:House of Lords? (Score 4, Insightful) 282

by iserlohn (#47577521) Attached to: UK Government Report Recommends Ending Online Anonymity

So who is whipping up the fevour? More likely than not it is people with money and connections.

Democracy allows government to be directed by the mob. Who controls the mob controls the government. That's the whole problem with campaign finance and lobbying in the US. In such a system, the politicians in government are only puppets servings moneyed interests. These are the people funneling money into lobbying and the political machine (e.g. Koch brothers) or controls the press (think Murdoch and Fox news).

It is blindingly obvious that it is not the people in government that calls the shots, it's the people that have the money to get the people in government.

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