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Comment Re:Please put a second car on the track (Score 2) 97

2nd human driver? Or another computer driven car? There would be nothing exciting about having two computer driven cars on the track driving 120mph. It would only be impressive to see the cars drive side by side the entire time without touching, or in line like a train.
Oracle

Submission + - Sun's MySQL Site Hacked Via SQL Injection->

Trailrunner7 writes: The Web site MySQL.com and other Web servers belonging to Oracle Corp.'s Sun Microsystems division were compromised on Sunday by Romanian hackers who took advantage of a SQL injection vulnerability in an application running on the server.

A group of Romanian hackers using the handles TinKode and Ne0h broke into the Web servers hosting MySQL.com, the main Web site for the open source database product, as well as sister sites for the French, German, Italian and Japanese markets. The hackers posted account credentials for MySql.com administrators, including the account credentials for Robin Schumacher, MySQL's Director of Product Management, and Kaj Arnö, MySQL's VP of Community and others.

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Power

Submission + - CryoEnergy Storage at 1/4 the Cost of Batteries->

An anonymous reader writes: One of the major issues with renewable energy technologies like solar and wind power is that energy generation tends to be intermittent — i.e. the sun doesn’t always shine and the wind doesn’t always blow. Therefore, in order for such technologies to be capable of meeting our needs without the support of fossil fuels, we need to find effective and commercially viable ways to store energy. Highview Power Storage recently unveiled a new tech that holds great promise for energy storage — the CryoEnergy System (CES). CES takes excess energy generated and uses it to run refrigeration units which cool air down to a temperature of -196C (-320.8F), at which point it liquefies. The liquid air, also known as cryogen, can be stored in an insulated tank, and at times of peak-demand, when the direst output of existing energy sources cannot meet the demands of a power grid, this liquid air is released to generate energy.
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Security

Submission + - McAfee's website full of security holes-> 1

Julie188 writes: "The McAfee.com website is full of security mistakes that could lead to cross-site scripting and other attacks, researchers said in a post on the Full Disclosure site on Monday. The holes with the site were found by the YGN Ethical Hacker Group, and reported to McAfee on Feb. 10, YGN says, before they were publicly disclosed to the security/hacking mailing list. Embarrassing? Yes, especially given that the company aggressively markets its own McAfee Secure service that is supposed to assure consumers that McAfee has scanned a website and found it to be safe."
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Submission + - What's the cost of a Gigabyte? 1

interfecio writes: Bandwidth costs are a hot item currently, with Canada ISPs introducing allowances and charging overages, do you know what you're paying for each Gig transferred? I've looked at my routers transfer stats, and it's quite interesting.

November 2010 (Incoming: 109555 MB / Outgoing: 5825 MB)
December 2010 (Incoming: 119505 MB / Outgoing: 4931 MB)
January 2011 (Incoming: 119884 MB / Outgoing: 4579 MB)

@ $58/mo it comes out to on average 47 cents per GB. I'm not exactly a light user, but I wouldn't consider my household extreme either. With a lot of information now "cloud" based, video, voice, data storage, will we start to see a reversal of cloud services because costs could become more of a factor?
AMD

Submission + - Intel : Don't Buy Or Ship Our PCs w/ Bad Chipsets->

siliconbits writes: Intel has sent an official email, urging its own channel customers to steer clear from systems build using the Intel 6 series chipsets; more specifically, the semiconductor giant wants them to stop building and shipping systems based on the chipsets. AMD must be VERY happy
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Data Storage

Submission + - Mozy's Free Cloud Storage Evaporates, Ups Fees->

Lucas123 writes: Since MozyHome launched in 2006, the online backup service offered unlimited storage capacity for $4.95 per month. Today, the company said it can no longer afford to do that because its customers have increased their capacity usage by 50% over the past year due to the use of ubiquitous hi-def cameras and video recorders as well as enormous digital music collections. Analysts say other online cloud providers are likely to follow suit.
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Submission + - Secret Police Back in Court->

Roger T. Shrubber writes: In another instance of the police claiming that their jobs as public servants are in fact private, The MI Supreme Court is hearing a case against Dr. Dre (et al.) for taping a police official backstage during a concert at Detroit's Joe Louis Arena.
Related story: http://news.slashdot.org/story/10/09/27/2244216/Motorcyclist-Wins-Taping-Case-Against-State-Police

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Submission + - Motorola sticks to guns on locking down Android->

jeffmeden writes: "These aren't the droids you're looking for" proclaims Motorola, maker of the popular Android smartphones such as the Droid 2 and Droid X. At least, not if you have any intention of loading a customized operating system, according to Motorola's own Youtube channel used to show off upcoming products. Motorola:"@tdcrooks if you want to do custom roms, then buy elsewhere, we'll continue with our strategy that is working thanks." The strategy they are referring to is a feature Motorola pioneered called "e-fuse", the ability for the phone's CPU to stop working if it detects unauthorized software running. More information available via a story at Android blog site AndroidCentral
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Space

Submission + - Canadian firm plans 78-satellite Net service-> 1

matty619 writes: A CNET article is reporting on another try at low earth orbit satellites for internet access, reminiscent of Teledesic, an ill fated $9Billion Bill Gates/Paul Alen et al venture originally consisting of 840 low earth orbit satellites (LEO-SAT).

MSCI, which stands for Microsat Systems Canada Inc., is trying to be a bit of a maverick with its project, called CommStellation. The company said today that its approach of using small, inexpensive satellites in low orbit--about 620 miles above the Earth--means better coverage of the world's population, quicker launch, and better network capacity.

Specifically, the company is able to use more ordinary electronics with its lower-elevation satellites. Medium orbit satellites--about 5,000 miles above Earth--such as rival O3b need components with higher reliability in order to withstand the temperature and radiation rigors of space. MSCI's satellites are also relatively small, meaning that 14 can be packed into a single launch rocket compared with O3b's 4 satellites. And much less power is required to transmit data to and from the MSCI's satellites since they're closer to Earth.

Each MSCI satellite has a data-transfer capacity of 12 gigabits per second. The expected lifespan of each is 10 years, and they can be sent back into the atmosphere at the end of their lives to avoid more orbital clutter.

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