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Comment: Re:Completely wrong (Score 1) 519

by inhuman_4 (#48173509) Attached to: Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again
systemd isn't sinking it's hooks in to anything. It is exposing kernel functionality, and adding additional functionality that developers want to use. That is why things are becoming dependant on it.

There is no secret cabal of systemd people sneaking in hard dependencies in Gnome3 or GIMP. It's just regular developers taking advantage of functionality provided by someone else.

Comment: Ian Jackson (Score 5, Informative) 519

by inhuman_4 (#48171975) Attached to: Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again
For those who don't know, Ian Jackson was the most vocal anti-systemd proponent on the committee. Considering that last time systemd was up for vote he tried: strategic voting, usurping the committee chairman, and finally throwing a temper-tantrum and refusing to talk to anyone for a few days. When it was all over he promised to try and reverse the committees decision with a General Resolution.

And now having failed to win on technical merits, he is back at it again trying to kill systemd via 'loose coupling'. Something that the committee declined to rule on.

Comment: The arms race continues (Score 5, Interesting) 429

by inhuman_4 (#48112309) Attached to: BitHammer, the BitTorrent Banhammer
The BitHammer relies on Local Peer Disocovery which gives priority to peers that are close to the bit torrent client. This is good for ISPs because it tries to keep the bit torrent traffic inside their own network instead of hammering peering connections. This also makes connections faster for the bit torrent client.

If you want to get around BitHammer you just need to turn off Local Peer Discovery, if BitHammer can't find you it can't block you. But now the ISPs are going to get screwed because Local Peer Discovery is turned off. This will also make the torrents slower for the client.

Sounds like a loose/loose situation to me.

Comment: Re:Slashdot Response (Score 1) 774

by inhuman_4 (#48094803) Attached to: Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems
"they don't understand that more than one person works on systemd"

Hell from what I've seen many of the complainers still haven't figured out that systemd means more than just PID1. Take a look at the comments on Phoronix if you want to see how bad it gets. There was a huge discussion about what "modular" means.

Comment: Slashdot Response (Score 5, Insightful) 774

by inhuman_4 (#48092231) Attached to: Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems
Article: Old, crusty, and possibly bug ridden part of the kernel is being moved to userspace. This new work will increase both the security and the stability of Linux systems, while adding the possibility of internationalization support.....

Slashdot Comments: Finally some one is doing something about CONFIG_VT. People have been bitching about that for years!

Article: this new feature is part of systemd.

Slashdot Comments: NOOOO! Why is Lennart taking away my freedoms! I'm switching to BSD.

It has gotten pretty clear that a lot of the hatred for systemd has nothing to do with the technical merits. This is a fix that has been a long time coming. Yet, almost half the comments are just more systemd hate fest.

Comment: Re:What happened to Debian? (Score 1) 403

by inhuman_4 (#47982623) Attached to: Debian Switching Back To GNOME As the Default Desktop
Except that isn't close to what happened.

Tech sites like slashdot covered the systemd/upstart drama for weeks as it was being pushed through the technical committee. They had a lengthy investigation, multiple rounds of voting, a member of the committee had a temper-tantrum, tried to vote the committee's chairman out. The whole systemd/upstart was a huge shit show that even people who don't use Debian (like) watched if only for it's entertainment value. Hell the conspiracy at the time was that Canonical was using the fact that 3 members of the committee were former employees to create a voting block and push upstart through the system.

In the end it came to a tie and the committee chairman had to cast the deciding vote.

Comment: Re:The pot calling the kettle black (Score 1) 261

by inhuman_4 (#47982499) Attached to: Obama Presses China On Global Warming
The problem for Canada is that it IS really hard when you are the only country on the continent that signed up for limits. Around 70% of Canada's exports go to the US, which Canada is in a free trade zone with. Any major climate change policy that is done in Canada but not the US will simply drive business south.

Comment: Re:The over-65's swung it for No (Score 4, Interesting) 474

by inhuman_4 (#47947011) Attached to: Scotland Votes No To Independence
The problem with have with giving 16 year olds the right to vote is that it was a one time thing. If Scottish government had come out and said that 16 is an appropriate voting age, and kept that age for all votes then that is okay.

But they didn't do that. They only set the age at 16 for this vote because they believed that the younger crowd would vote yes, which is the way they wanted. Whether or not young people actually voted yes doesn't change the fact that the Scottish government played fast and loose with the democratic system. I don't really see how this is any different than the gerrymandering that goes on the in the US.

Comment: Where are the forks? (Score 1) 826

by inhuman_4 (#47752603) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide
The problem I have with this debate is the lack of forks.

The whole premise of open source is that you can change the code to the way you like it. Look at XFREE86/Xorg, OpenOffice/LibreOffice, X/Mir/Wayland, Unity/Gnome3/MATE, MySQL/MariaDB, and so on. So if there is a large community of experienced Linux people who hate systemd there should be plenty of forks of major distros that use SysVinit instead. So where are they, where is the 'save SysVinit' project? Where is the Debian derivative that keeps the old scripts? For all of whining about systemd you would think where is enough people to maintain several distros. Yet the systemd and upstart teams seems to be the only groups of people actually doing anything concrete.

Linus said “Talk is cheap. Show me the code." and I think that applies perfectly here. No amount of trash talking is going to generate code, forks, or distros.

Comment: Re:More F-35 Hate (Score 1) 364

by inhuman_4 (#47421549) Attached to: The Pentagon's $399 Billion Plane To Nowhere
Sorry you feel that way. But if you look at my account I've been active since 2009, rather dedicated for an astroturfing account.

The truth is the track record on the F-35 is little different than any other post-cold war weapons program. They are always over budget and behind schedule.

F-22: Too slow, no air to ground, too expensive, stealth not proven, too little armament, no competitor for it to face, cold war relic, etc. Orders dropped from 750 to 195. Now people are proposing to buy more of them instead of the F-35.

B-2: Stealth not proven, too slow, too expensive, hangar queen, poor handling, etc. Orders dropped from 132 to 21. Now it's heralded as a sign of American military power.

Elements of Power: http://elementsofpower.blogspot.ca/2013/08/f-35-critics-same-sht-different-century.html Does a great job comparing the complaints about the F-35 to complaints made about the F-15.

It's always the same nonsense, complaining about specs that don't matter in modern combat, ignoring improvements to things that do matter, offering no alternative, complain about cost.

Comment: More F-35 Hate (Score 1) 364

by inhuman_4 (#47420341) Attached to: The Pentagon's $399 Billion Plane To Nowhere
Ah yes more F-35 hate.

Claim the costs are increasing, except the price per plane is decreasing. Check.

Faux outrage at the $1 trillion price tag that has been part of the plan for decades and pays for R&D for 3 new fighters, a purchase order for ~2,500 aircraft, plus maintenance and training for 55 years. Check.

Complain that it has a part built in every state, just like every other military project in the last 50 years. Check.

Unfortunately the authors forgot to mention how important dog fighting is to a strike fighter. Also passed up the opportunity to talk about how we are not sure if stealth actually works. I mean, the least they could do is compare it to the F-16 using clean specs and a non-inflation adjusted price from the 80s.

Standard cheap-shots on the costs, but weak follow through on "manoeuvrability problems". I'll give it a 6/10.

Comment: Re:His choices... (Score 5, Insightful) 194

by inhuman_4 (#47349543) Attached to: The Internet's Own Boy
For sure he made some poor choices.

But that doesn't excuse the government response. The justice department had no reason to act in such a heavy handed manner. They quite clearly wanted to make an example of him and were willing to bend the law to do so.

But the bigger issue here isn't Swartz, it's the fact that this kind of treatment has become common place. Putting a "hacker" in solitary confinement didn't make any sense when they did it to Kevin Mitnik, and it didn't make any sense with Swartz. It's an abuse of power, the tragedy is it took a suicide for people to notice.

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