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Books

Top EU Court: Libraries Can Digitize Books Without Publishers' Permission 102

Posted by samzenpus
from the go-ahead-and-scan dept.
jfruh writes The top European court has ruled that libraries have the right to digitize the contents of the books in their collections, even if the copyright holders on those books don't want them to. There's a catch, though: those digitized versions can only be accessed on dedicated terminals in the library itself. If library patrons want to print the book out or download it to a thumb drive, they will need to pay the publisher.
Government

When Scientists Give Up 348

Posted by Soulskill
from the lab-rats-rejoice dept.
New submitter ferespo sends a report from All Things Considered about the struggle for scientific funding in today's political and economic environment. "Federal funding for biomedical research has declined by more than 20 percent in the past decade. There are far more scientists competing for grants than there is money to support them." It's a tough situation for new scientists trying to set up labs. In addition to all of the scientific work they do, it's essentially a full-time job in addition to that to maintain funding. The reviewers who decide which projects receive funding are risk-averse to the point where innovative research is all but off the table. The consequences of this are two-fold: not only are we giving up on the types of research that led to so many of today's marvels, but many promising young scientists are giving up on the field altogether.
Security

Are the Hard-to-Exploit Bugs In LZO Compression Algorithm Just Hype? 65

Posted by timothy
from the you'll-never-feel-it dept.
NotInHere (3654617) writes In 1996, Markus F. X. J. Oberhumer wrote an implementation of the Lempel–Ziv compression, which is used in various places like the Linux kernel, libav, openVPN, and the Curiosity rover. As security researchers have found out, the code contained integer overflow and buffer overrun vulnerabilities, in the part of the code that was responsible for processing uncompressed parts of the data. Those vulnerabilities are, however, very hard to exploit, and their scope is dependent on the actual implementation. According to Oberhumer, the problem only affects 32-bit systems. "I personally do not know about any client program that actually is affected", Oberhumer sais, calling the news about the possible security issue a media hype.
Censorship

The Promo Bay Blocked By UK ISPs 132

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the culture-police dept.
hypnosec writes "The Pirate Bay's artist promotion platform (the Promo Bay), despite being perfectly legal, is being blocked by several UK Internet service providers including BT, and Virgin Media. The Promo Bay was launched this week as a promotion platform for content creators like filmmakers and musicians enabling them to showcase their talent and work to thousands of people across the web. Even though the idea is novel, The Promo Bay has somehow found itself on a block list alongside the Pirate Bay."

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