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Submission + - US Supreme Court upholds removal of works from Pub ( 2

langelgjm writes: While much of the web is focused on the SOPA and PIPA blackout, supporters of the public domain today quietly lost a protracted struggle that began back in 2001.The Supreme Court, in a 6-2 decision, rejected the argument that Congress did not have the power to convey copyright upon works that were already in the public domain. The suit was originally filed to challenge provisions that the U.S. adopted when signing the TRIPs agreement. Justices Breyer and Alito dissented, arguing that conveyed copyright on already existing works defied the logic of copyright law. Justice Kagan recused herself. The text of the opinions is available here (PDF).

Submission + - Could thorium make nuclear power safe? ( 2

Jetrel writes: "With the recent events in Japan nuclear power is getting a lot of bad press lately about it's potential dangers. Looking forward to possible replacements I ran across this article and thought what better group to put in the mix about debates on alternative energy sources. So can the world have cheap nuclear power without Japan-level risks by swapping thorium for uranium, some scientists claim. Is that too good to be true?"

Submission + - Security Update Leaves Older iPhones Unprotected 3

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The Register reports that iOS 4.3 update, which includes a number of critical security fixes, is incompatible with the still widely used iPhone 3G leaving users of older iPhone at heightened risk of drive-by download attacks from booby-trapped websites that contain maliciously-crafted TIFF image files. "There might be a hardware reason why the latest version of the software can't be run on older devices," says a spokesman Security firm Sophos. "Even so, Apple could still release an update for Safari for older devices, the most problematic omission." The handful of malware strains to have infected iPhone devices thus far have only infected jailbroken devices and although it hasn't happened yet, mobile malware spreading via browser vulnerabilities is a potential threat adds Sophos. The problem with the 3G is reminiscent of the charges made last year, when Apple released an OS update that at least one angry iPhone owner said in a lawsuit was purposely designed to break older iPhones, forcing customers to upgrade to the iPhone 4. Plaintiff Bianca Wofford called her upgraded iPhone 3G "a device with little more use than that of a paper weight," and added that apps took longer to open, the phone calling interface hung and crashed more than usual, and that she frequently had to power her 3G off and on again to get it to work at all."

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