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Comment: SSC? (Score 3, Interesting) 51

by Michael Woodhams (#49756851) Attached to: Protons Collide At 13 TeV For the First Time At the LHC

The Superconducting Super Collider would, if not cancelled, have had 40TeV collisions about 15-20 years ago. The LHC is using computing resources that are very challenging to supply in 2015, exceeding what would have been achievable for SSC by a factor of perhaps 1000 (15-20 years of Moore's Law.)

Had SSC been completed, would the computing and detector technology have been able to make effective use of the collisions? Was it in fact a correct decision to abandon it at that time? Would the much higher collision energy have reduced the detection/computational load in some way? (E.g. higher signal to noise, leading to needing many fewer collisions.)

Comment: Re:There are quite a few haters on this thread but (Score 1) 214

Further, if this was in existence a few decades ago, perhaps we would have nipped Scientology in the bud before it landed in the UK.

If it were in existence ~1400 years ago, perhaps we would have nipped Islam in the bud.

If it were in existence ~2000 years ago, perhaps we would have nipped Christianity in the bud.

And I wonder how many readers agreed with my first line, then threw a shit-fit when they got to my second line.

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Comment: Re: Apple ][ was a great product (Score 1) 74

by cpt kangarooski (#49745473) Attached to: In 1984, Jobs and Wozniak Talk About Apple's Earliest Days

Though there was a good reason for the original compact Macs to discourage users from opening them up -- there were exposed high voltage monitor electronics in there which could give you a hell of a zap of not properly discharged.

The later all in one Macs of the 90s were better in that regard. Their user suitable parts (motherboard, drives) all were easy to get at, but the monitors and power supplies were fully enclosed.

Comment: Re:The Road Warrior (Score 1) 776

...not a sequel, but a cash-in remake.
It's not a Mad Max movie. The main character isn't Max, the atmosphere isn't Mad Max's, it just happened to have spiked cars chasing plated cars in the wastland.

Indeed. What they should have done was get the writer/director of the original film, who I gather had been trying to get a sequel made for over a decade, to come and write and direct the new one. Clearly whoever they got to write this didn't really understand Max's character at all.</sarcasm>

Comment: Re:New Jersey and Other Fictions... (Score 1) 615

by cpt kangarooski (#49707607) Attached to: The Economic Consequences of Self-Driving Trucks

These people are increasingly rare, given that more gas stations lack "full-service" pumps.

Well, chalk one up for electrics, I guess.

Tesla's working on automated full-service battery swapping stations. And apparently also on charging cords that can plug themselves in:

http://www.theverge.com/2014/1...

Robots of that sort already exist, so you can see the sort of thing he's probably referring to:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

Comment: Re:Won't save most of the 4000 lives (Score 1) 615

by cpt kangarooski (#49707571) Attached to: The Economic Consequences of Self-Driving Trucks

Local delivery (Fed Ex, UPS etc) will still have an operator (or perhaps two or more) that can jump out with the package while the delivery truck drives around the block

That's what the Amazon drones are for. The truck just has to cruise through the neighborhood. Meanwhile, small drone aircraft that it carries will work to carry packages out of the truck and to front doors. A human will still be needed for heavy or bulky packages, or for deliveries that have to be brought inside or where there's no convenient place for the drone to land to deposit them, but those packages and destinations can be separated from the others at the local depot, and all put on a smaller number of trucks, therefore needing a smaller number of humans. You won't need a human for every truck if you work out the routes each day based on the nature of the packages you've got and where you're taking them.

Comment: Re:Good thing climate change isn't real! (Score 1) 293

by Alsee (#49707527) Attached to: Larson B Ice Shelf In Antarctica To Disintegrate Within 5 Years

My first hit for "Global warming"+"times faster" yields this link: As the Earth moved out of ice ages over the past million years, the global temperature rose a total of 4 to 7 degrees Celsius over about 5,000 years. In the past century alone, the temperature has climbed 0.7 degrees Celsius, roughly ten times faster than the average rate of ice-age-recovery warming.

All the opinions you mentioned are, at best, poorly informed.

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