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Comment: 5 days during the aftermath of Hurricane Ike (Score 3, Informative) 328

by Arrowmaster (#35218530) Attached to: In case of a blackout, batteries etc. will give me ...

When Hurricane Ike caused massive wind speeds and damage to the midwest, we were without power from Sunday to Thursday due to all the downed power lines all over the state. I ran a laptop, wireless router, and cable modem off of a 300watt inverter plugged into my car the entire time. I had to go outside and run the car for 30 minutes every 12 hours to keep the battery charged but I never once lost internet access. The neighbors couldn't believe I still had working high-speed internet access in that kinda situation.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 162

by Arrowmaster (#31594756) Attached to: How To Evade URL Filters With (Not-So) Fancy Math

No. Dotted-decimal notation is the only acceptable way to represent an IPv4 address in a URI according to RFC 3986. That RFC even specifically mentions that many implementations that process URIs make use of platform-dependent system routines, such as gethostbyname() and inet_aton(), to translate the string literal to an actual IP address and that may allow ways around filtering software.

If it is explicitly against the RFC then browsers shouldn't allow it.

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#page-20
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-7.4

Comment: Re:And the lesson people don't learn is... (Score 1) 162

by Arrowmaster (#31594746) Attached to: How To Evade URL Filters With (Not-So) Fancy Math

We don't. Dotted-decimal notation is the only acceptable way to represent an IPv4 address in a URI according to RFC 3986. That RFC even specifically mentions that many implementations that process URIs make use of platform-dependent system routines, such as gethostbyname() and inet_aton(), to translate the string literal to an actual IP address and that may allow ways around filtering software.

If it is explicitly against the RFC then browsers shouldn't allow it.

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#page-20
http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-7.4

Comment: Re:There's more to this story (Score 1) 691

by illumina+us (#31224340) Attached to: Our Low-Tech Tax Code
Wasn't two years ago when health insurance became mandatory in MA? Pretty sure if you're unemployed you can go through Mass Health or Neighborhood Healthplan. What's silly is that I can't choose to get those if my employer provides a group policy (even if that group policy is much worse, and much more expensive). le sigh

Comment: Re:Redundant Array of INEXPENSIVE Disks (Score 1) 227

by Arrowmaster (#28683369) Attached to: Building a 10 TB Array For Around $1,000
After I had yet another Western Digital harddrive die making an 8/11 or 72% failure rate over 5 years, I just ordered parts for a new computer including a hardware RAID from Newegg yesterday.

8x SAMSUNG F1 RAID Class HE103UJ
1x 3ware 9650SE-8LPML
1x 3ware BBU-MODULE-04 Battery Backup Unit

For $1,829.90 to make a 7 drive hardware RAID 6 array with 1 hotspare, but it seems I went with a lot higher quality parts than they did. And I included the price of the controller...

After my horrible experiences with consumer Western Digital drives (6x 250GB PATA and 2x 500GB SATA dead in the last 5 years), I wasn't about to touch these new consumer 2TB "Green" drives or the cursed Seagate 1.5TB drives so I went with the more expensive HE103UJ's. I hope they are worth it since this will be my first experience with a RAID. In the past I just used everything as separate drives since they weren't purchased all at once and I've paid greatly for that mistake.

It's not an ULTRA CHEAP RAID but I think it should be a fairly high quality one at least.
The Internet

+ - IPv6 over Social Networks->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A new RFC has been published this morning to significantly speed the deployment of IPv6.
With IPv6 over Social Network (IPoSN): o Every user is a router with at least one loopback interface; o Every friend or connection between users will be used as a point- to-point link.
It is noted that latency on the network can be very high, though."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Hack first, ask later? (Score 1) 90

by illumina+us (#26212683) Attached to: With Lawsuit Settled, Hackers Working With MBTA
Well... none of it is really private property per se. The MBTA is a public entity running a public service entirely financed by the public and its customers (who are also the public). Moreover, these fiber "closets" aren't even closets and anyone who has had any networking experience at all would be rather appalled just walking around the T-stops. Most of the break-out boxes are either wide open or unlocked and are not even secured behind a door. At just about every stop you can find a fiber "closet" mounted on a supporting strut in the middle of the station.

To the other person that replied to you though. The MBTA system most likely didn't belong to the MIT students at all since I very much doubt the majority of them were even from the Boston area.

Either way, the MBTA system is stupidly easy to circumvent and with the amount of fiber they have running throughout the T they really should've built a more reliable system. The buses and commuter rail could've been covered too with either a radio or satellite based network (which is currently in place on most MBCR coaches).

Comment: The ISPs should have to pay for it (Score 1) 249

by illumina+us (#22520288) Attached to: BBC iPlayer Bandwidth Explosion Bodes Ill For ISPs
ISPs lease you a line, sometimes private, sometimes shared. Most businesses, especially those that do video streaming, etc. get a private (non-shared line) and in their contract with the ISPs their bandwidth is guaranteed. Most consumers have shared lines but their bandwidth isn't guaranteed, it just usually is available because most subscribers don't use up their available bandwidth on their leased lines. ISPs sell a company or private individual a line with x available bandwidth of x' available throughput on the line. The line will always have the same capacity but because they oversubscribe they can get away with selling 20 4mbps/384kbps lines per say a DS3 (so near double the throughput of the line itself). If everyone used the their connections the downstream would be completely saturated but the upstream would still be ok, and then consumers would be in outrage over not getting their money's worth. But consumers are already not getting their money's worth because most of them don't use the entirety of their line, and on top of that are getting nickle and dimed for every bit over X bytes/month on an already overpriced 'net connection. This is roughly equivalent to a transportation service selling 150-200 seats on a 75 seat vehicle and then expecting the people who frequently use their service to pay more and/or turning away everyone that doesn't get on the vehicle. Either way the company is at fault and they need to pay for their mistakes, not their customers.

Comment: Widescreen Fix? (Score 1) 55

by Arrowmaster (#21580895) Attached to: New BioShock Content, BioShock 2 Rumors
If this was suppost to fix widescreen I still want to know why I'm forced to play in widescreen even after getting this update on my Xbox360? I'm using the VGA cable connected to a fullscreen LCD and using a fullscreen resolution of 1024x768 but the game is still in widescreen leaving me with big black bars on the top and bottem.... Why did they only fix the FOV for the whiny brats but not fix this. A wider FOV but still being stuck with letter boxing is going to make everything look even smaller since my LCD is only 20" and letter boxing reduces the viewable area down to about the size of a 17-18" widescreen which don't even exist because they're stupidly small. I've actually noticed this with a lot of games but Bioshock is one of the few games that its so noticeable that its annoying and detracts from the gameplay.

"Life sucks, but death doesn't put out at all...." -- Thomas J. Kopp

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