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Comment: Some calculations (Score 1) 56

by ilguido (#47033287) Attached to: SpaceX Cargo Capsule Leaves Space Station For Home
So NASA spent $1.6 billion for the CRS program, that is for 12 missions [1]. That is $75 million for mission. The payload of the CRS-3 mission, the biggest so far by the way, was 4,605 pounds (the declared maximum is 7,300 lb)[2], in other words $16,200 for pound of payload, including packaging. I'd like to know how does that compare to other space transport services.

Comment: Re:A bit of common sense maybe? (Score 1) 747

by ilguido (#46483603) Attached to: Measles Outbreak In NYC
Wrong! You go to jail if you fail to assess a reasonable risk. (1) After a four months long earthquake swarm many buildings were weakened, (2) the earthquake swarm wasn't over, so (3) more earthquakes were probable (for the swarm was going on) and many buildings weren't ready for more (because they already suffered damage), conclusion: there was a reasonable risk, and the experts failed to assess it. That's how it works for technical evaluations.

Comment: Re:A bit of common sense maybe? (Score 1) 747

by ilguido (#46483239) Attached to: Measles Outbreak In NYC

The GP post was clearly referring to the United States.

I know, funny smartass, but since I also know that in the US there's this little thing: criminal transmission of HIV, I was questioning if the parent post was right or if it was just the usual 'murican screaming "Constitution!!!11!!", when there's something he doesn't agree with.

Comment: Re:A bit of common sense maybe? (Score 1) 747

by ilguido (#46482755) Attached to: Measles Outbreak In NYC

- fines for not vaccinating your children

Unconstitutional.

Really? In Italy if you don't vaccinate your underage children you'll be fined for sure, because it's regarded a threat to public health. I think you can even lose the "patria potestà" (that is your children are no longer yours) if you refuse to conform.

Comment: Re:"pro-Russian forces in Crimea" (Score 1) 479

Yes and it has nothing to do with what I said. I wasn't talking about Crimea, I was talking about Ukraine at large. You are a fool if you think that Putin is doing all this just for Crimea: this is not a battle for Crimea, that was already lost to Ukraine the moment that they let ultra-nationalists take a big part in the revolution, this is a battle for the whole Ukraine.

Let's get back to the point of my previous post. Things for the Russians would be much, much, much harder, I'd even say impossible, If there weren't these idiots: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v... (BBC Newsnight). In the moment of maximum weakness of an already weak country, they brought division and idiotic nationalist mumble jumble, when they should have cared about political and ethnic cooperation (you know, "United we stand, divided we fall"). That's a big fault and it's not a Russian fault.

Comment: Re:"pro-Russian forces in Crimea" (Score 3, Interesting) 479

The 'Ukrainian people' means different things to different people - if you're an ethnic Russian in Crimea you live in Ukraine but probably have much more allegiance to mother Russia than the government in Kiev. If you're a kid in Kiev born post-Soviet era to ethnic Ukrainian parents, different deal. Ethnic Tatar, different again.

I don't want to start a heated debate, so I'll answer only this point: saying that "the 'Ukrainian people' means different things to different people" is the exact mistake that brought them at this point. The Ukrainian people is all the people that dwells Ukraine: Ukrainians, Russians, Hebrews, Romanians, Poles and Tatars. The opposition parties should have been more levelheaded: if they really wanted to keep Ukraine united, they should have tried to keep the people (all of them) united. Instead they let the nationalists take a big part in the whole process, including rejecting a reasonable deal mediated by the EU with a president that was actually democratically elected and had a lot of support in vast areas of the country, taking three seats in the government including ministry of defence, and removing the Russian language from the list of the official languages of the country.

I'm not saying that Russia is right, but that the revolutionaries acted quite stupidly: they should have tried to wheedle ethnic minorities, not stir them up.

Comment: Re:"pro-Russian forces in Crimea" (Score 4, Funny) 479

Well, it usually works. Don't fix it, if it ain't broken.

More seriously, Ukraine is a failed state at the mercy of the shenanigans of both western and Russian shills. And, more importantly, neither party, Russia and West, act for the better of the Ukrainian people.

Comment: Re:Most Software Is Shit (Score 1) 100

by ilguido (#45560543) Attached to: Open Source In the Datacenter: It Was Never About Innovation

I mean, Jesus Christ, America. We can see it happening right now in China. They were shit in the world economy (and their own economy, for that matter) until the government started letting businesses actually profit and compete with others (i.e., more capitalism).

The Corporatism part is quite right, after all the corporatist state envisioned by Mussolini was a system of lobbies, regulated by formal mechanisms. However, when Deng Xiaoping turned China towards a market economy (but not really a capitalist one) in the 80s, China was already doing comparatively better than India or Brazil, two capitalist states that a few decades early were in a better position than post-revolutionary China. The actual Chinese economic system is a bit complex and not really capitalist, its big players are state owned and the banking system (that is the capitals) is mainly state-owned or under the firm grip of the state.

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