Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Totally uninformed. (Score 2) 269

by ikefox (#35010720) Attached to: 100 P2P Users Upload 75% of Content
The fact that they were only analyzing Mininova and The Pirate Bay explains the erroneous nature of their results. Those websites don't represent the entirety of BitTorrent - in fact, the real copyright-infringing pirates try to remain unaffiliated with torrent sites entirely, and private trackers represent the majority in terms of data transferrence these days in regards to BitTorrent. These "researchers" obviously know practically nothing about how the torrent tracker heirarchy works. Their article is just a nice source to cite to my friends when they ask me why they shouldn't use TPB or Mininova to download that new Kanye West album.

Comment: Finders, keepers (Score 1) 466

by ikefox (#32181226) Attached to: Apple Loses Another 4th-Gen iPhone
When this happened the first time around, I briefly questioned whether or not it might be a publicity leak. Now I have confirmation that Apple is just as good at holding on to their trade secrets as I was at keeping up with my homework in the 4th grade. Also, why can't I ever find a prototype of some highly-anticipated tech candy left unattended in a bar somewhere?

Comment: Re:more mod abuse, time to burn some excess karma. (Score 1) 756

by ikefox (#32026928) Attached to: California's Santa Clara County Bans Happy Meal Toys
I'm no mod, but it was a silly comment. Of course the fast food companies are taking advantage - that's capitalism. They're taking advantage of a demand - it doesn't matter whether demand for Happy Meals didn't exist before McDonalds, it just matters that there is demand for them now which McDonalds takes advantage of to make money. Is that so difficult to understand?

Comment: Summary is misleading (Score 1) 396

by ikefox (#30936658) Attached to: Does Personalized News Lead To Ignorance?

I think the quote in the summary was taken out of context. Lee wasn't claiming that the general populace is becoming more ignorant - he was claiming that there is little incentive for individuals to do reporting on a local scale because most individuals are not simply interested in local matters but national and world news as well. It was a response to the interviewer, who asked how plausible it could be now or in the future for an individual with specialized local knowledge to start an online newspaper for profit. That's why I've tagged badsummary. The full excerpt in context:

James Turner: Do you think there would be a place for a model where I said, "I know more about Derry, New Hampshire than anybody else who can report about it. So I will just start a subscription site for anybody who wants to know about Derry"? Essentially, launch my own online newspaper by subscription and charge little enough that I'm making it up on volume. Could that work, or is that going to suffer from the same "getting the word out" problem that all the other disintermediation strategies seem to be hitting? Chris Lee: I don't know. I'd like to see it work. I guess I'm skeptical. I think one of the observations about how consumers are behaving in the past five years that has surprised me the most is, again, this lack of feeling responsible for knowing the news of their country and their local government of that day. I don't think it's just a technology question. I think if you asked people now versus the same age group 20 years ago, I think they'd be stunningly less informed now about boring news, and tremendously more knowledgeable about bits of news that really interest them. I'm not sure that's entirely bad. But the guy in Darien, Connecticut is going to be churning out a lot of news of the day. And if everybody'd rather dig into their little content niche for what they really care about, Mr. Darien's going to have trouble making money. I'm not sure that's entirely bad. But the guy in Darien, Connecticut is going to be churning out a lot of news of the day. And if everybody'd rather dig into their little content niche for what they really care about, Mr. Darien's going to have trouble making money.

Comment: Re:This is why UFO observations are always so susp (Score 1) 418

by ikefox (#30384834) Attached to: Gigantic Spiral of Light Observed Over Norway; Rocket To Blame?

Get a report from someone at the scene and you're suddenly including in hysteria, panic, adrenaline, and a whole other list of things that someone seeing something unfamilar will have affect their judgement.

You insult me as though I'm making assumptions when you're the one who is assuming. Hysteria? Panic? I specifically said I'm a skeptic to the idea that aliens put that in our sky, mainly because I'm skeptical of intelligent life being anywhere near our solar system. I didn't even reference the other people who had seen it specifically - I did address a few of the "theories" that I saw several people mention in various articles and comments - but I drew no strong conclusion in any direction. I'm well aware that things that a complete stranger says are subjective / subject to bias, since that's a fairly basic social concept.

The entire leading point of my post was that I had no good idea of what the object was. I didn't claim that my post was verifiable, nor did I claim I have any intensive knowledge of meteorology, rocketry, or physics even.

It wouldn't matter if I had claimed those things though, because I take no shame in being incorrect over something like this. As somebody reading a news article in my spare time, I don't have any responsibility to anyone beyond myself to make a completely informed comment.

Comment: Aliens....? (Score 1) 418

by ikefox (#30380510) Attached to: Gigantic Spiral of Light Observed Over Norway; Rocket To Blame?
These images are bizarre. In some of them, the light seems to be coming over the mountains in the background, almost as if it were being projected from on the ground. But this doesn't make sense, as a projected image would not ordinarily coalesce in one place in the sky, as it appears to have done. The Archimedean spiral formation that appeared seems too perfect to be the result of a weather formation. This does not look like any aurora that meteorologists have documented, so far as I'm aware. However, nature always has surprises for us uncomprehending humans. The stipulation that it was a rocket that had gone out of control also seems unlikely. Again, the image seems too perfect. I'm honestly stumped, but too skeptical to want to believe that this is alien contact.

Comment: Aliens...? (Score 1) 6

by ikefox (#30379702) Attached to: Gigantic spiral of light observed over Norway
These images are bizarre. In some of them, the light seems to be coming over the mountains in the background, almost as if it were being projected from on the ground. But this doesn't make sense, as a projected image would not ordinarily coalesce in one place in the sky, as it appears to have done. The Archimedean spiral formation that appeared seems too perfect to be the result of a weather formation. However, nature always has surprises for us uncomprehending humans. The stipulation that it was a rocket that had gone out of control also seems unlikely. Again, the image seems too perfect. I'm honestly stumped, but too skeptical to want to believe that this is alien contact.

+ - Gigantic spiral of light observed over Norway-> 6

Submitted by Ch_Omega
Ch_Omega (532549) writes "A mysterious light display appearing over Norway last night has left thousands of residents in the north of the country baffled. Witnesses from Trøndelag to Finnmark compared the amazing display to anything from a Russian rocket to a meteor to a shock wave — although no one appears to have mentioned UFOs yet. The phenomenon began when what appeared to be a blue light seemed to soar up from behind a mountain. It stopped mid-air, then began to circulate. Within seconds a giant spiral had covered the entire sky. Then a green-blue beam of light shot out from its centre — lasting for ten to twelve minutes before disappearing completely.

The Norwegian Meteorological Institute was flooded with telephone calls after the light storm — which astronomers have said did not appear to have been connected to the aurora, or Northern Lights, so common in that area of the world."

Article in English here: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1234430/Mystery-spiral-blue-light-display-hovers-Norway.html
More pictures here(in Norwegian): http://www.nrk.no/nyheter/distrikt/troms_og_finnmark/1.6902392?index=false"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Making everyone a criminal is convenient (Score 1) 560

by ikefox (#30288618) Attached to: Verizon Changes FiOS AUP, -1, Offtopic

The more numerous the laws, the more corrupted the state.

That's only partially correct. The more numerous the laws, the more potential for the abuse of power. A written law does not imply the level of enforcement for itself. Corruption results from improper delegation of power and intransparency of government. Of course, examples of these can be found in the cases of almost every major government in history.

More laws are the means of corruption, not the cause.

Comment: It's a tough call.... (Score 2, Funny) 550

by ikefox (#30217516) Attached to: Police Arrest Man For Refusing To Tweet
As much as I hate that Youtuber douchebag Justin Bieber, I think the cops were probably pretty stupid for arresting him, especially considering what appear to be the facts. However, I'd be pretty pissed off if I was a cop and I had to disperse a mob of whiny, caffeinated teenage girls congregating over *that* guy too, so I can empathize. I still anticipate a false arrest case.

Comment: Re:Memory is an interesting thing (Score 3, Informative) 302

by ikefox (#29965054) Attached to: Scientists Build a Smarter Rat
Well, the NR2B gene is encoding for a very common and well known receptor within both rat and human brains - the NMDA receptor. These receptors have been the target of the majority of recent studies into working memory and synaptic plasticity, or so-called "long-term potentiation". Basically, the NMDA receptor is the most likely cause of memory reinforcement. The idea is that when two neurons fire simultaneously, the connection between them is strengthened for a long period of time. That is, the post-synaptic neuron becomes more sensitive to input from the pre-synaptic neuron. This effect is input-specific, in that it is only effective between the two specific neurons involved, and no similar input from other pre-synaptic neurons is necessarily potentiated. Most LTP relies on the NMDA receptors to function, via the calcium ion channels within most synapses. This is why increasing the number of NMDA receptors would likely reflect a quantitative increase in memory. This isn't exactly breaking news - researchers have known about the NMDA receptors/NR2B gene for years, and I've seen studies from several years ago with the same approximate findings in animal models.

Comment: Re:Experience from academia (Score 1) 1259

by ikefox (#29806721) Attached to: Student Loan Interest Rankles College Grads
I will not argue with you that "State Universities are run by mortal men and women, who make the same mistakes and misteps as the rest of us". However, it's ludicrous to think that large-scale universities don't have business administrators who are at least SUPPOSED to have a basic understanding of economic and managerial principles, for the purpose of running the university in an efficient manner. The issue is often neither a lack of educators doing their job, nor a lack of business-men/women doing their jobs. It's mostly the lack of proper understanding and communication between the two that causes inefficiency in most higher-education institutions.

Machines that have broken down will work perfectly when the repairman arrives.

Working...