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Comment: SAAS is a failure, this proves it (Score 1) 226

When a publisher can revoke a legitimately (or at least, good-faith) purchased key, what hope does the consumer have when his OS goes subscription?

Fuck it. If Gearbox pull this shit with Homeworld I'll just stick with my original boxed copy and forego the new content.

Comment: Re:Simple solution (Score 1) 277

by ihtoit (#48911539) Attached to: Police Organization Wants Cop-Spotting Dropped From Waze App

In 1999, the most recent year for which data are available, more than 6 million crashes occurred on U.S. highways, killing over 41,000 people and injuring nearly 3.4 million others. Rear-end collisions accounted for almost one-third of these crashes1 (1.848 million) and 11.8 percent of multivehicle fatal crashes (1,923). Commercial vehicles were involved in 40 percent of these fatal rear-end collisions (770), even though commercial vehicles only comprised 3 percent of vehicles and 7 percent of miles traveled on the Nation's highways. Between 1992 and 1998, the percentage of rear-end collisions involving all vehicles increased by 19 percent. In 1999, 114 fatal crashes in work zones involved rear-end collisions, about 30 percent of the multivehicle fatal work zone crashes. Of these, 71 collisions (62 percent) involved commercial vehicles.

In the past 2 years, the National Transportation Safety Board investigated nine rear-end collisions in which 20 people died and 181 were injured (three accidents involved buses and one accident involved 24 vehicles). Common to all nine accidents was the rear following vehicle driver's degraded perception of traffic conditions ahead. During its investigation of the rear-end collisions, the Safety Board examined the striking vehicles and did not find mechanical defects that would have contributed to the accidents. In each collision, the driver of the striking vehicle tested negative for alcohol or drugs. Some of these collisions occurred because atmospheric conditions, such as sun glare or fog and smoke, interfered with the driver's ability to detect slower moving or stopped traffic ahead. In other accidents, the driver did not notice that traffic had come to a halt due to congestion at work zones or to other accidents. Still others involved drivers who were distracted or fatigued.

https://app.ntsb.gov/safety/sa... all you need.

Comment: Re:Who eats doughnuts with the doughnut men? (Score 1) 277

by ihtoit (#48911373) Attached to: Police Organization Wants Cop-Spotting Dropped From Waze App

Its the cops' job to put themselves into "dangerous" situations in order to protect the public.

What a load of bollocks. IT IS NOT a cops job to put his own life on the line to protect ANY member of the public. HIS JOB is to uphold the Law UP TO the point where he knowingly puts his own life in danger - at which point, his own life becomes his single priority.

YOU DO NOT have the right to be protected by anybody else. Your own personal safety is your own personal problem. Should you choose to employ someone else to protect you, they do so on the understanding between you, which usually precludes them taking a bullet for you and remains within the letter of the Law.

Comment: Re:has not answered the important question (Score 0) 98

by ihtoit (#48908253) Attached to: NVIDIA GTX 970 Specifications Corrected, Memory Pools Explained

The fix here would be to issue a firmware update that disables that slow 500MB*, and update the labelling on the card to reflect the fact that it's a 3.5GB card not a 4GB.

*Ever run RAM of two different speeds in a desktop? Wonder where those crashes are coming from? It's not a case of the faster RAM waiting for the slower RAM, the slower stuff is tripping over trying to keep up with the faster stuff. It doesn't work in the same way as a PATA channel where the bus runs at the speed of the slowest device.

Comment: Re:has not answered the important question (Score 0) 98

by ihtoit (#48908193) Attached to: NVIDIA GTX 970 Specifications Corrected, Memory Pools Explained

no, I did not say that. The claim is that these cards, in the first instance, are being sold as 4GB cards. That's as may be, but the top 500MB is deliberately crippled (to turn a 980 into a 970? I don't get the logic) to the point where it can and does cause repeated and repeatable crashes when the 3.5GB ceiling is met under certain conditions, which is ENTIRELY doable when you have a multiple screen setup. That is the issue.

Comment: Re:Been tried (Score 1) 72

by ihtoit (#48908139) Attached to: Modular Smartphones Could Be Reused As Computer Clusters

depends, what's your data worth to you sitting on a drive that's not spinning while you wait for your shiny new WD Red?

(I use "obsolete" commodity components in building my NAS gear. My current one uses a 2-port SATA riser on a Via Eden board, mounted in a Shuttle XPC case (equipped with a 100W PSU) and running LAMP docuwiki headless. Total hardware worth: £12 for the SATA riser, total cost: + about £200 for the mainboard and case back in 2006. Just because it's obsolete doesn't mean I should simply bin it).

Comment: has not answered the important question (Score 1) 98

by ihtoit (#48907987) Attached to: NVIDIA GTX 970 Specifications Corrected, Memory Pools Explained

What about those users (more than one, anecdotes are data not anomalies!) whose use causes the GPUs to attempt to address more than 3.5GB VRAM causing them to crash out? If what NVidia are claiming here according to TFS is accurate, then this should not be happening. It is happening, the 3.5GB roof is being hit hard and people are feeling it. What say you, NVidia?

Comment: Re:Compute per watt (Score 1) 72

by ihtoit (#48907931) Attached to: Modular Smartphones Could Be Reused As Computer Clusters

heat? We're talking about a technology reuse in places such as rural India and middle Africa where daytime temperatures often exceed 45C, I don't think they're going to be overly concerned about something they're a: not pushing that hard anyway - use cases for these things are going to be about as mundane as GDOs and routers - and b: costs them next to nothing to obtain and deploy. If your use case requires investment in fluid pumped cooling I would say that your use case also calls for something with a bit more pep than an ARM SOC.

Comment: Re:Compute per watt (Score 1) 72

by ihtoit (#48907781) Attached to: Modular Smartphones Could Be Reused As Computer Clusters

I get the difference bwtween a 40W brick for a laptop and half a rack of isolators and switchgear delivering 17kW for a five Petabyte cluster, I've dealt with both. I don't imagine for one minute that TFA is talking about competing with Big Iron either in terms of power efficiency or in terms of raw computing power. It's talking about using existing hardware that would otherwise find its way into landfill simply because Johnny Facebook has no further use for it after buying his iPhone 20z, for processes where that hardware can be proven in its environment rather than $Third_World_Telecoms_Startup having to deal with seven-digit sums in maintenance contracts and leasing and IBM.

Comment: Re:Compute per watt (Score 1) 72

by ihtoit (#48907671) Attached to: Modular Smartphones Could Be Reused As Computer Clusters

if compute efficiency were really an issue, we'd all be using RasPis and running RISC OS. As it is, we are all, each and every one of us, using what is available to us "until something we can afford which is in our own mind better comes along". Right now, personally speaking, the most efficient thing for me to do is keep my AMD APU until it burns out and THEN worrying about specifying my next hardware purchase. I'm not about to go buy the latest greatest >1.0-efficient process platform just because it's there because I simply CANNOT AFFORD IT. I'll use what is available to me NOW.

Comment: Re:Depends on use (Score 4, Insightful) 72

by ihtoit (#48907617) Attached to: Modular Smartphones Could Be Reused As Computer Clusters

unless you're talking about a shop in middle Africa or even Outback, China that proposes to utilise such a system in a mesh network to bring remote communities one step closer to being Facebook zombies.

Hell, for that matter - how much processing power do you need to run a DHCP router?
Or a DVR?
Or a home automation system? Something as simple as an automatic garage door opener?
An RFID reader?

There's a BUNCH of uses for low power/small iron that Big Iron would be utterly WASTED on. The aforementioned is not, by any means, exhaustive.

The other line moves faster.

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