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Comment The continuing wimpification of system admin (Score 5, Insightful) 93

Once upon a time, a BOFH would manage his system with a pistol. If we KILL'ed a process, we'd loot its shotgun and be even more feared. It was brutal, bloody, and cruel. The way system administration is supposed to be. "root, red in tooth and claw."

Now? Minecraft. And not a good PvP server, either. I'll bet they don't even have TNT or skeleton archers, either. "Creative mode". My 9-year-olds sneer at creative mode. No bloodshed. No mayhem. Nothing to lose.

Pretty soon, it'll be VM management by buying outfits for Hello Kitty in Hello Kitty Container Adventure.


Comment Re:VS CODE ! = Visual Studio (Score 4, Informative) 158

I suspect the confusion arises because TFA (last link in TFS) says that

The free and cross-platform Chromium-based code editor Visual Studio Code is being open sourced today.

(Emphasis added)

"Chromium-based" means it's based on a web browser engine, but that doesn't make it web-based. Its backside could easily be file- or Git-based, as you say.

Very interesting, and maybe confusing, move by Microsoft.

Comment The Entire Subject Article is Wrong (Score 3, Interesting) 352

Every candidate they list is a local console application using a local framebuffer desktop system.

Real terminal emulators are network detached from a headless server system.

I use PuTTY SSH from Windows, command-line OpenSSH from a native (non-graphical) console for Linux, or VxConnectBot on my Android phone (which has a slider keyboard).

Sometimes I'll actually use an old-school serial-port terminal emulator on an old Amiga to connect to my "desperation serial port" console on my home server. Weird how that thing will be working when must network-based ttys are down.

Comment Summary lesson: Physical access trumps all. (Score 3, Interesting) 73

All the example attacks cited in the article, and the evil maid attack in the summary, require uninterrupted physical access to the computer. While the specific techniques are interesting, they're all just applications of the the first principle that if an attacker gets unimpeded access to the hardware they're attacking, you have no defenses left.

If your computer is stolen, the lesson here is to assume it's compromised because physical access trumps all.

Makes you wish you could install anti-tamper self destruct on such systems.

Comment Sad news ... Gene Amdahl, dead at 92 (Score 2) 78

Just heard some sad news on talk radio - Computer designer Gene Amdahl was found dead in his Palo Alto home this morning. There weren't any more details. I'm sure everyone in the Slashdot community will miss him - even if you didn't enjoy his work, there's no denying his contributions to geek culture. Truly an American icon.

Comment Re:Which version of unix? (Score 1) 406

None of that nasty GNU stuff needed.

Unless the sysadmin has a brain, in which case she installs the optional but ubiquitous GNU userland packages and places them first in execution paths. Because the UNIX native utils suck dead donkey balls.

But yes, in those true UNIX systems /usr/bin and /usr/sbin is probably pure UNIX heritage, for good or ill.

Comment This sounds slightly familiar (Score 1) 77

Urban legend has it that back in Old Days of the Revolution, the Chinese Communist Party billed the family of an executed criminal* for the cost of the bullet used to execute him.

There's some dispute to this, of course. It is hard to believe because it would be beyond the pale of decency, even to the extent it would be acknowledged by Communist revolutionaries, to bill you for the cost of their oppression.

But not, apparently, in Oceania.

*"criminal" often meant political opponent, not necessarily an actual criminal.

You know you've landed gear-up when it takes full power to taxi.