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Submission + - Carmakers Keep Data On Drivers' Locations From Navigation Systems (

cold fjord writes: Detroit News reports, "A government report finds that major automakers are keeping information about where drivers have been — collected from onboard navigation systems — for varying lengths of time. Owners of those cars can’t demand that the information be destroyed. And, says the U.S. senator requesting the investigation, that raises questions about driver privacy. The Government Accountability Office in a report released Monday found major automakers have differing policies about how much data they collect and how long they keep it. Automakers collect location data in order to provide drivers with real-time traffic information, to help find the nearest gas station or restaurant, and to provide emergency roadside assistance and stolen vehicle tracking. But, the report found, “If companies retained data, they did not allow consumers to request that their data be deleted, which is a recommended practice.”"

Submission + - IA State AIDS Researcher Admits to Falsifying Findings

theodp writes: "With countless lives depending on their work," writes Brett Smith, "it seems unthinkable that AIDS researchers might falsify their work. However, that's just what Iowa State University assistant professor Dong-Pyou Han has admitted to, according to federal documents." Han resigned from the project in October after admitting to tampering with samples to give the appearance that an experimental vaccine was causing lab animals to build up protections against HIV. According to the NIH, Han apparently spiked rabbit blood with human blood components from people whose bodies had produced antibodies to HIV. 'This positive result was striking, and it caught everybody’s attention,' said the NIH. However, researchers at other institutions became suspicious after they were unsuccessful in duplicating the ISU results. The Iowa State AIDS research project had been awarded $19 million in federal grants over the past several years. Han has agreed to be banned from participating in any federally-financed research for three years.

The Twighlight of Small In-House Data Centers 180

dcblogs writes "Virtualization, cloud services and software-as-a-service (SaaS) is making it much easier to shift IT infrastructure operations to service providers, and that is exactly what many users are doing. Of the new data center space being built in the U.S., service providers accounted for about 13% of it last year, but by 2017 they will be responsible for more than 30% of this new space, says IDC. 'We are definitely seeing a trend away from in-house data centers toward external data centers, external provisioning,' said Gartner analyst Jon Hardcastle. Among those planning for a transition is the University of Kentucky's CIO, who wants to reduce his data center footprint by half to two thirds. He expects in three to five years service provider pricing models 'will be very attractive to us and allow us to take most of our computing off of our data center.' IT managers says a big reason for the shift is IT pros don't want to work in data centers at small-to-mid size firms that can't offer them a career path. Hank Seader, managing principal of the Uptime Institute, said that it takes a 'certain set of legacy skills, a certain commitment to the less than glorious career fields to make data centers work, and it's hard to find people to do it.'"
Electronic Frontier Foundation

DOJ Often Used Cell Tower Impersonating Devices Without Explicit Warrants 146

Via the EFF comes news that, during a case involving the use of a Stingray device, the DOJ revealed that it was standard practice to use the devices without explicitly requesting permission in warrants. "When Rigmaiden filed a motion to suppress the Stingray evidence as a warrantless search in violation of the Fourth Amendment, the government responded that this order was a search warrant that authorized the government to use the Stingray. Together with the ACLU of Northern California and the ACLU, we filed an amicus brief in support of Rigmaiden, noting that this 'order' wasn't a search warrant because it was directed towards Verizon, made no mention of an IMSI catcher or Stingray and didn't authorize the government — rather than Verizon — to do anything. Plus to the extent it captured loads of information from other people not suspected of criminal activity it was a 'general warrant,' the precise evil the Fourth Amendment was designed to prevent. ... The emails make clear that U.S. Attorneys in the Northern California were using Stingrays but not informing magistrates of what exactly they were doing. And once the judges got wind of what was actually going on, they were none too pleased:"

Submission + - Power and Ego, Not Money, May Have Fueled Alleged Dutch Hacker (

An anonymous reader writes: The alleged Dutch hacker extradited from Romania to the US appeared to be driven by his desire to rule the criminal credit-card hacking world more than money, according to a computer security expert who had extensive contact with him last year. David Benjamin Schrooten is now in Seattle facing a 14-count indictment in what is one of the largest credit-card number hacking cases since that of Max Butler, who ran

Submission + - Iran's Nuclear Objectives (

HSNnews writes: "I had the privilege of being in Washington, DC to attend the annual American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) policy conference last March at the invitation of one of AIPAC’s board members. AIPAC is one of the most powerful lobbying groups in the nation; more than 13,000 people attended, including President Barack Obama, the President of Israel, Shimon Peres, and the Prime Minister of Israel, Benjamin Netanyahu, and members of Congress. This year’s conference attendance certainly reflects the power of the pro-Israel lobby. Despite the concern for the nation of Israel and its supporters over a nuclear Iran and the centrality of that subject at the conference, one of the questions asked by many speakers was: should Iran be considered an Israeli issue, or is this a US/International problem?"

Submission + - WiiU Priced at £199 According to Amazon ( 1

YokimaSun writes: DCEmu have today posted an article confirming that Amazon UK have today put up a preorder price of £199 for the WiiU, the newest of Nintendo`s consoles that is due to be released before this Christmas, the price of £199 is much lower than other prices from shops like Shopto who put a price of an RRP of £279.99 only a few days ago. Will this be the catalyst for the WiiU to become a success in the next generation of consoles.

Submission + - Chords to 1300 songs analyzed statistically for patterns ( 1

hooktheory writes: "We looked at the statistics gathered from 1300 choruses, verses, etc. of popular songs to discover the answer to a few basic questions. First we look at the relative popularity of different chords based on the frequency that they appear in the chord progressions of popular music. Then we begin to look at the relationship that different chords have with one another.

To make quantitative statements about music you need to have data; lots of it. Guitar tab websites have tons of information about the chord progressions that songs use, but the quality is not very high. Just as important, the information is not in a format suitable for gathering statistics. So, over the past 2 years we’ve been slowly and painstakingly building up a database of songs taken mainly from the billboard 100 and analyzing them 1 at a time. At the moment the database of songs has over 1300 entries indexed.

Knowing these patterns can give one a deeper more fundamental sense for how music works"

I like work; it fascinates me; I can sit and look at it for hours.