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Comment Re:Classic FUD (Score 1) 373

How is that really any different than a car in the next lane swerving into you or a deer jumping into the road or some piece of trash flying off the truck in front? Malicious hacking seems like one of the lowest probability ways for you to crash at 70 MPH. Driving is somewhat risky...these exploits add a small amount to that risk, but overall keeping the electronic safety systems engaged is most likely a significantly reduced net risk.

Comment Re:Autism and future employment trends (Score 4, Insightful) 36

I'm guessing the last places for employment for those who don't want to act like salesmen are going to be in scientific research...unfortunately that's a field that many IT or dev people wouldn't be able to deal with.

Sadly, I think that scientific research is more sales than science already. If you can't schmooze, politic and author grants at a world-class level, your research will never get funded in the first place.

Comment Re:Autistic-friendly business environment (Score 4, Interesting) 36

Agreed for a technician-, basic coder or clerical-level position, but at the developer, engineer or similar professional-level position it is a reasonable expectation for the employee to work on tasks that can't be clearly defined in advanced, that don't have checklists (creating one may be a deliverable of the professional), and surprise or firefighting type situations that the techs and clericals can't resolve with the pre-existing check lists. Granted it is possible to reduce surprises with basic workplace stuff like meeting agendas and advance notice of policies, but one the flip side dealing with urgent, unplanned issues is an important part of most jobs.

It's a difficult road to navigate. I'll add a suggestion from the other side, as someone who has managed people with this style of accommodations due to ASD-type conditions. Be as open and willing to collaborate with your supervisor as possible; help educate them. If you only work through an HR person to specify your ADA or other workplace accommodations, there is an extremely limited amount of information they can legally share with your supervisor. Of course it is your legal right to keep these things private if you choose, but it makes it much harder for your supervisor to meet your needs and to foster a productive work environment for you. It does require some trust, but the outcome can be much better. I've had it go both ways.

Comment Re:Mystery (Score 5, Informative) 159

The question of whether acupuncture (in any of its hundred or thousands of forms) is more effective than control (a.k.a. "placebo effect") has been answered conclusively -- it is not. Acupuncture is indistinguishable from sham acupuncture in numerous, well controlled studies. It is the theatre, not the treatment that has any effect; and those effects are only measurable in the short-term against subjective outcomes. In other words, it's risky (infection, organ/vessel piercing), has no more benefit than just talking to someone or sitting quietly for a half hour, and does not improve health in any known objective measure.

The placebo effect "works" for a very narrow definition of "works", which is far less than what practitioners of these worthless treatments claim.

Comment Re:Mystery (Score 1) 159

Not really, because unlike real medicine, chiropractic has no standard of care from which one can expect or anticipate a particular outcome nor judge the performance of the practitioner. Anything that goes right or wrong in the course of "treatment" can be handwaved away with nonsense explanations about misalignments, energies, chi or whatever other subjective crap absolves the chiropractor of any responsibility to reality, while simultaneously allowing him to sell snake oil vitamins and smoothie mixes and to schedule "tune up" and "adjustment" appointments for as long as the patient still has money in his wallet and faith in the charlatanism.

Comment Is this really something new? (Score 5, Interesting) 368

Firefighters already have the ability to damage private property when it is necessary to contain an emergency situation. I can't imagine this law adds additional powers, but perhaps clarifies that existing standards still apply to a new technology that didn't exist at the time. Perhaps also a reasonable public awareness / scare campaign to remind people to keep their drones away from disaster areas where they are interfering with life safety.

Comment Re:Analog for the win. Again. (Score 1) 97

The OP is referring to an Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI), which are now widely mandated in residential buildings by electrical codes in the US. The breaker has an embedded signal processing circuit which analyzes the power waveform and cuts power when patterns that look like excessive arcing caused by a faulty device, damaged cable or frayed cord are observed.

Comment Anti-SLAPP (Score 0) 210

This is clearly a case for application of anti-SLAPP laws. My understanding is that California already has pretty good options in this area, but many other states and the federal system do not. A good anti-SLAPP law allow the defendants in these cases to request dismissal of the case prior to the very expensive discovery phase AND allow for recovery of legal fees.

Comment Re: Bad men could do bad things with this tech! (Score 3, Informative) 105

Why does it matter? The garage probably has a dozen different tools and garden or sports implements hanging on the wall that would make opening the door a trivial exercise whether locked or not. A person willing to break into the house once would certainly have no problem doing it twice.

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