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Medicine

CDC Reports 1 In 88 Children Now Affected With Autism In the US 398

Posted by samzenpus
from the definitely-an-increase dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A new government health report indicated that about one in 88 children in the United State has autism or a related disorder, the highest estimate to date, which represented an overall increase of 25 percent since the last analysis in 2006. The Centers for Disease Control reported on Thursday that the rate increased by 78 percent compared to the reported rate in 2002. From the article: '"The CDC’s new estimate of autism prevalence demands that we recognize autism as a public health emergency warranting immediate attention," Autism Speaks Chief Science Officer Geri Dawson said in a new release. "More than ever, these numbers compel us to redouble our investment in the research that can reveal causes, validate effective treatments and guide the effective delivery of services to all our communities," she added.'"

Comment: Re:Fuel Savings (Score 2) 253

by i22y (#37195292) Attached to: United Pilots To Use iPads For Navigation

Actually, I was thinking more directly than that. 11,000 iPads are -- without a volume discount (so its a high estmate) -- would be $5.5M roughly. 326,000 gallons fuel -- (if its the same fuel price as you find at the pump) would be roughly $1.1M. So while it might make a lot of sense long term, its going to take 5 years of fuel savings to recoup the investment in iPads. If jet fuel is more expensive than car fuel, it has to be 5x as expensive to make it worth it in a single year.

They save not only the weight of the paper manuals (what the original fuel savings calculation references), but also the ability to roll out updates to all pilots quickly and cheaply. In addition, Jeppesen paper subscriptions are very expensive. Quite a bit cheaper on the iPad, yielding further savings.

Comment: Lightspeed Zulu (Score 1) 110

by i22y (#32551602) Attached to: Best Telephone For Datacenters?

The Lightspeed Zulu is a headset designed for airplane and helicopter pilots, but has a bluetooth interface. It has active noise cancellation that's much stronger than that of the Bose QC series, and it also has a music input if you want to pump in an iPod. I've used the Zulu's in a helicopter sitting on the edge with the door removed doing aerial photography, and when calling someone else they couldn't tell I wasn't sitting in a quiet office. Truly unbelievable. They're about $850 though.

Transportation

The World's First Commercially Available Jetpack 303

Posted by kdawson
from the quieter-in-version-2 dept.
ElectricSteve writes "It's been a long time coming. While Arthur C. Clarke's geosync satellites have taken to space, and James Bond's futuristic mobile technology has become commonplace, still the dream of sustained personal flight has eluded us — until now. At $86,000, the Martin Aircraft jetpack costs about as much as a high-end car, achieves a 30-minute flight time, and is fueled by regular gasoline. A 10% deposit buys you a production slot for 12 months hence." Here's a video of some indoor test flights. This isn't Buck Rogers's jetpack — it's about 5 by 5 feet and weighs more than the average human. You won't be able to commute with it (the FAA has not certified this class of device) so it's recreational only for now.
Space

+ - Iridium satellite crashes into defunct Russian sat

Submitted by i22y
i22y (10479) writes "A nearly 1500lb operational Iridium communications satellite collided with an out-of-service Russian communications relay satellite. Excerpt: Asked which satellite was at fault, Johnson said "they ran into each other. Nothing has the right of way up there. We don't have an air traffic controller in space. There is no universal way of knowing what's coming in your direction." The damaged Iridium satellite is being replaced with a spare that is already in orbit, and service impact is negligible."
Space

Ultra-Sensitive Camera To Measure Exoplanet Sizes 62

Posted by timothy
from the ignoring-global-poverty dept.
Roland Piquepaille writes "US astronomers and engineers have built a new camera to precisely measure the size of planets moving around distant stars. This camera has been dubbed OPTIC — short for 'Orthogonal Parallel Transfer Imaging Camera.' According to the research team, it is 'so sensitive that it could detect the passage of a moth in front of a lit window from a distance of 1,000 miles.' I'm not sure if this analogy is right, but the team said it was able to precisely define the size of a planet called WASP-10b which is orbiting around the star WASP-10, about 300 light-years from Earth."

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