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Comment: Re:Ground breaking (Score 2, Informative) 137

by i.of.the.storm (#34077446) Attached to: Cheap Metal-Insulator-Metal (MiM) Diode Created
I think you're right, and I would guess that the startup costs are much cheaper with this technology. But I wonder how useful it is when we can already print thousands transistors for pennies after the initial cost of a fab. Maybe it will allow for easier tinkering for people sitting in their garage? Would be pretty cool to build your own diode.

Comment: Re:Deceiving naming... (Score 1) 116

by i.of.the.storm (#33957724) Attached to: AMD Demos Llano Fusion APU, Radeon 6800 Series
I think the 5830 is actually just a little better than the 5770 in real world performance but uses a significantly more power. I think the 4870 is actually also pretty close to the 5770 in performance, might actually be faster in fact. But the 5770 is based on the 5800 series core I think, just a little cut down.

Comment: Re:Different than a laptop? (Score 1) 106

by i.of.the.storm (#32454456) Attached to: Jumbo Dual-Screen "Kno" Tablet Debuts At D8
Heck, now you can get e-ink ebook readers for $150. The Sony Pocket Reader is discounted to that price in a lot of places, and the Kobo reader apparently also is at that price too. I just got a Pocket Reader off woot and it's pretty awesome so far, besides the small screen, but I think any ebook reader that's less than a full size letter paper is going to have problems with viewing PDFs without reflowing. As a note, my Pocket Reader actually reflows the text in a PDF pretty well for the most part, but it just involves a lot of page turning (4ish page turns for each real page). I actually am finding that while most devices are moving towards convergence, dedicated ebook readers are actually pretty nice. I agree, I'm not sure who this is targetted at, especially since it doesn't have the brand appeal of someone like Apple. Maybe if Apple made something like this, people would buy it for $600-800, but anyone else would be SOL (Apple would probably also make it more usable, RDF notwithstanding, but that's another story).

Comment: Re:4GB? (Score 1) 224

by i.of.the.storm (#32329918) Attached to: Seagate Launches Hybrid SSD Hard Drive
Well, that is true. But depending on who you talk to, some people will tell you that it's not unlikely that we'll find a way around the wall when the time comes. I myself don't know much about process technology, but one of my electronics professors would occasionally mention that we've thought that there were dead ends in the technology before, until someone made a breakthrough discovery and found a way around the roadblocks. However, we are indeed getting to a point where we're limited by the size of the atoms themselves, which is problematic. But the future is exciting and unknown, so who knows what will happen next.

Comment: Re:Cannonical is just trolling us (Score 1) 984

by i.of.the.storm (#31643362) Attached to: Ubuntu Will Switch To Base-10 File Size Units In Future Release
Yes, that makes sense; that's why the prefix should be different to distinguish that we're not talking about math, physics, etc. By the way, prefixes are very important in electrical engineering, and 1 kilo ohm is definitely not 1024 ohms, so your point about kilo's meaning in computer engineering is kind of invalid. Using kilo to mean 1024 is just an abuse of notation. It's kind of silly to assume that you can hijack prefixes to mean whatever you want, and you're kind of arguing against yourself when you talk about things like 10 bits in a byte - of course we don't have 10 bits in a byte, but then we don't call it a decabit, we call it a byte. Of course, all that being said, kibibyte and mebibyte are really awkward to say so I do say kilobyte and megabyte because that's what the OS has always said and that's what people understand, but you have to admit that it is imprecise to just go around hijacking prefixes to mean something different.

Everyone can be taught to sculpt: Michelangelo would have had to be taught how not to. So it is with the great programmers.

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