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Submission + - Linux 3.12 merge window closes with release of Linux 3.12-rc1 (

hypnosec writes: Linus Torvalds has released Linux 3.12-rc1 marking the first major development in over two weeks for the forthcoming successor of Linux 3.11 kernel. Announcing the closure of Linux 3.12 merge window, Torvalds noted in the release announcement that the window was fairly normal. Dissecting the updates he noted that 73 percent of them are related to drivers, 12 percent related to architecture updates, and 6 percent updates are related to file-systems. The remaining, Torvalds notes, fall under misc category. Emphasizing on some of the merges, Torvalds notes that he liked "scalability improvements that got merged this time around." Torvalds also makes a note about tty layer locking getting resolved, and work on dentry refcount scalability.

Submission + - Torvalds mulls 22 years of Linux celebration as he releases Linux 3.11-rc6 (

hypnosec writes: Linus Torvalds announced released the Linux 3.11-rc6 yesterday and noted that he is happy because the size of the release candidates are shrinking. Some of the fixes present in rc6 are meant for network drivers, usb, sound, and filesystems. It also brings with it x86, ARM and a few small m68k updates. Beyond the usual rc release updates, Torvalds dwells into specifics of the number of commits as well as the size of files that hold those commits. August 25, 2013 will mark the completion of 22 years since Torvalds first announced his “free” operating system through a mailer on comp.os.minix with a subject “What would you like to see most in minix?” Remembering this Torvalds ended the release announcement saying that he will be releasing more interesting statistics next week when he releases Linux 3.11-rc7 “because that should coincide with the 22nd anniversary of the original Linux announcement on comp.os.minix.”

Submission + - Linux 3.10 officially released (

hypnosec writes: Linux 3.10 kernel has been officially released on Sunday evening which makes the 3.10-rc7 the last release candidate of the latest kernel which yields the biggest changes in years. Linus Torvalds was thinking of releasing another rc but, went against the idea and went ahead with official Linux 3.10 commit as anticipated last week. Torvalds notes in the announcement that releases since Linux 3.9 haven’t been prone to problems and 3.10 is no different. However, he added that this release could have gone either but, there was no specific reason for another rc and break the normal pattern of "rc7 is the last rc before the release."

Submission + - Misplaced Parenthesis in Kernel Code Leads to Weak Keys in NetBSD 6.0 (

hypnosec writes: NetBSD has a serious flaw within its random number generator implementation at the kernel level because of which systems would generate weak and easy to crack cryptographic keys. The reason for this flaw in the code is allegedly misplaced parenthesis within the kernel source code. Because of the flaw the system could end up generating random number which wouldn’t be necessarily random. Risk is at its highest when system is booting as it has very little entropy at its disposal to generating random numbers. 32-bit systems are more vulnerable than their 64-bit counterparts as there would only be 4-billion possibilities for potential entropy, which is technically feasible to brute force considering the computing power available today.
Open Source

Submission + - Torvalds Releases Linux 3.8 Kernel ( 2

hypnosec writes: Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 3.8 kernel on Monday afternoon marking it as a special "Presidents' Day Release. Linus released the Linux 3.8-rc6 at the start of the month and had warned developers against sending in large number commits that are bulky. Developers seem to have taken the warning seriously as announcing the release through a mailing list, Linus revealed the new kernel and noted that the last week was quite calm when it came to commits because they were less in numbers and smaller in size.

Submission + - Linux 3.8-rc5 Released, Quietly (

hypnosec writes: Rather than the usual mailing list announcement for Linux kernel release Linus Torvalds has released Linux 3.8-rc5 quietly. With no announcement prior to release and even a day after the Linux 3.8-rc5 was tagged, Torvalds went onto post a message on Google+ about the release earlier today, The latest release candidate contains over 300 commits; has updates in btrfs, f2fs, ptrace and module loading and comes with quite a few driver updates.

Submission + - Linux 3.7 Having Major Network Performance Regression Claims Developer (

hypnosec writes: A well-known Linux developer and maintainer of Linux 2.4 kernel series has reported that he has observed multiple network performance issues in the newly released Linux 3.7. Revealing his observations, Willy Tarreau, wrote that the performance issues that he has observed may very well be coming from Linux network stack and that these issues may be present in the recently announced Linux 3.8 rc-2 as well but, he hasn’t seen similar reports. Tarreau has explained in detail about the technicalities of the issue through this mailing list thread.

Submission + - Linus Torvalds Delays Linux 3.7, Releases 3.7-rc8 Kernel Instead (

hypnosec writes: The Linux 3.7 kernel has been delayed by one week as Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 3.7-rc8 instead on Monday. Because of some hiccups following the “resurrection of a kswapd issue,” Torvalds wasn’t comfortable releasing the version 3.7 this week and instead went ahead with another release candidate. Torvalds revealed in his release announcement that because of this delay, the merge window for Linux 3.8 will close just around Christmas time.
Open Source

Submission + - Linux 3.7 Kernel to Support Multiple ARM Platforms (

hypnosec writes: The yet to be released Linux 3.7 kernel is getting exciting by the day prior to its release as it has been announced that the kernel will be supporting multiple-ARM System on Chips (SoCs) / platforms. Up until now there is a separate Linux kernel build for each of the ARM platform or SoCs, which is one of the several problems when it comes to ARM based Linux. The merging of ARM multi-platform support into Linux 3.7 will now put an end to this problem thus enabling the new kernel to not only target multiple platforms but, also be more in line with its x86 counterpart.

You cannot have a science without measurement. -- R. W. Hamming