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Submission Hacker claims running DirectX10 outside Vista

Roy van Rijn writes: "Since Microsoft released Vista they've been claiming DirectX10 (one of the best reasons to run Vista) is so tightly connected to the new Vista-kernel its unable to distribute it to other platforms. But some hackers from the Alky Project claim otherwise. With a preview build on their website the claim seems to be correct. And if thats the case it becomes clear that the DX10 only being possible for Vista was just a marketing trick. Cody Brocious (part of the Alky team) stated that it would even be possible to run their DirectX10-SDK on OS-X or Linux. Happy gaming folks!"

Submission What should I do with my Web 2.0 project?

leeet writes: Web 2.0 Guy asks on Yahoo:;_ylt=AnmBL fwfcdDR1KUFJETomFrty6IX?qid=20070424070121AA1LWlR

I have an idea for a new type of website which I believe people will truly appreciate and spend a lot of time on it. I spent almost a year working on the business plan, researching potential competitors (as there is no direct competitors as of now), working on the features, creating documents. Basically, all I need to do now is to pull up my sleeves and start coding. The problem is that I don't have time as I have a job and a family. I estimated that it will require me more than 2 years of coding before I can release a stable version. So, I'm thinking about selling my idea (probably very hard as I don't want to disclose information for free), working for a potential competitor where I could manage this product or finally create an open source project where everyone could work on it. What are my other options? I would really want this project to go ahead as I think it will change the way people live experience and search the Internet.

What would you do?

Feed Extreme Star Birth In The Carina Nebula To Celebrate Hubble's 17th Anniversary->

One of the largest panoramic images ever taken with Hubble's cameras has been released to celebrate the 17th anniversary of the launch and deployment of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The image shows a 50 light-year-wide view of the tumultuous central region of the Carina Nebula where a maelstrom of star birth -- and death -- is taking place.
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Feed Stanford Scientists Make Major Breakthrough In Regenerative Medicine->

Findings described in a new study by Stanford scientists may be the first step toward a major revolution in human regenerative medicine -- a future where advanced organ damage can be repaired by the body itself. Scientists show that a human evolutionary ancestor, the sea squirt, can correct abnormalities over a series of generations, suggesting that a similar regenerative process might be possible in people.
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"Don't tell me I'm burning the candle at both ends -- tell me where to get more wax!!"