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Submission + - iPhone accidents: Apple faces inquiries in the EU

o'reor writes: As more cases of iPhone screen explosions emerge in the news on this side of the pond, Apple is now facing official inquiries and lawsuits in France, which forced them to break silence and finally acknowledge the incidents.

"We are aware of these reports and we are waiting to receive the iPhones from the customers. Until we have the full details, we don't have anything further to add."

Following those reports, the European commission had already decided to step in last week, while Apple tried to dismiss the problem as "isolated incidents".

Meanwhile, iPhone explosion-related sites are now popping up on the Internet, releasing games such as iPop to chill out and relax on the subject, but also giving users advice on preventing iPhone accidents, or detecting imminent explosions.

Dear iPhone-owning geeks, now may be the right time to consider buying this Kevlar-lined underwear you've seen on ThinkGeek...

Announcements

Submission + - Amazing image of a single molecule released

Smivs writes: "The BBC are reporting that the detailed chemical structure of a single molecule has been imaged for the first time. The physical shape of single carbon nanotubes has been outlined before, using similar techniques — but the new method even shows up chemical bonds. Understanding molecular structure on this scale could help in the design of many things on the molecular scale, particularly electronics or even drugs. The team from IBM Research Zurich used what is known as an atomic force microscope or AFM. Their version of the device acts like a tiny tuning fork, with one of the prongs of the fork passing incredibly close to the sample and the other farther away. When the fork is set vibrating, the prong nearest the sample will experience a minuscule shift in the frequency of its vibration, simply because it is getting close to the molecule. Comparing the frequencies of the two prongs gives a measure of just how close the nearer prong is, effectively mapping out the molecule's structure. The measurement requires extremes of precision. In order to avoid the effects of stray gas molecules bounding around, or the general atomic-scale jiggling that room-temperature objects experience, the whole setup has to be kept under high vacuum and at blisteringly cold temperatures."

If graphics hackers are so smart, why can't they get the bugs out of fresh paint?

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