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Comment: Re:Depends (Score 2) 514 514

Because at work I have to install all kinds of Adobe crap and Java, and other software that uses proprietary files and each piece of crap "requires" something running in the background. They don't actually require it, but Windows allows it anyway. And let's not mention the fact that you really can't do anything about it, because the developers of those software packages are so used to it, that you will probably break them if you try to do things the Right Way(tm).

Here, at work, we image the PCs (we have 3000+) before sending them to the final users. One thing we do in our images is to disable autoupdates (Java, Adobe, Chrome, Firefox &c), and that makes the computers much snappier. We also filter the Windows Updates, pointing WU to an internal server. That makes the machines snappier in general. (Obviously, we keep one eye for security updates and push those to the users on the logon script, as needed).

Comment: Re:The Fuck? (Score 1) 175 175

MySQL is free and quick and dirty. Use Oracle, MSSQL and I've heard great things about Postgres. I have experience with the first two, and you can do some amazing things if you know what you are doing. They cost that much for a reason.

But probably not the reason you think. :D They cost that much so that some CIO can cover his arse when something goes terribly wrong with the corporate database... "we are waiting for Oracle support to tend to our ticket."

Comment: Re:I feel like Rip van Winkle (Score 4, Informative) 48 48

I will assume your question is serious. Posix never isolated processes. One process can see other processes' files, ports, and even the processes themselves. That is what containers are about: your web browser cannot see your email client's files and vice-versa (so a vulnerability in one process cannot give you access to the content of the other).

Comment: Re:Save this crap for rentals (Score 1) 76 76

There's nothing wrong with "infotainment" as long as it's audio. People have been listening to car radios without problems for many decades.

Well, actually, EVERYTHING increases the risk of accidents. And "without problems" is really an euphemism for "cars already kill thousands of people per year, so we really don't want to think real hard about what causes those >"... http://www.monash.edu.au/miri/...

Comment: Re:To be more specific ... (Score 3, Insightful) 327 327

In almost thirty years as a professional, I can say I have *NEVER* never never ever being to a productive meeting. A meeting that soothed some insecurity by a boss or client? Sure. A meeting where real decisions where taken after meaningful conversation and discussion? Nope.

Comment: Re:Not convinced (Score 1) 408 408

Computers are still too stupid.

One of the analogies I've seen at a speech on the subject went something like, "A computer can detect an object in the roadway, but it can't yet tell if it's a paper bag that can be safely run over or a rock that's apt to damage the car."

This was a few years ago, so I don't know if it's still true or not, but it does demonstrate the programming challenge in processing something exceedingly simple that even the most inexperienced human driver would be able.

But the computer will do the sensible thing and reduce speed, try to avoid the obstacle, be it a paper bag or a rock. One novel modality of violent-neighborhoods robberies has been "fill oranges or other fruit with nails and let them on the road; unaware drivers don't make any effort to avoid fruits on the road, get stuck with one or more flat tires, profit".

Another thing to think about is: the computer was not on in three of the four cases; yes, computers can be pretty stupid when they are not working. :D

Comment: Re:"If you aren't with us, you're against us." (Score 2) 230 230

The only problem is: they are already doing it. Without "our permission". And nobody is doing anything concrete to stop them. And it's possible that there *isn't* anything concrete that can be done to stop them on their tracks (although we can diminish their momentum with the judicious applying of cryptography and security conscience)...

"Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra and then suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath. At night, the ice weasels come." --Matt Groening

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