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Comment: Yes (Score 1) 3

by huckamania (#49772299) Attached to: Can Bad Scientific Practice Be Fixed?

Science isn't owned by government or big business. They may have the biggest levers, but the truth will out.

Science is owned by anyone and everyone who is interested in the pursuit of Truth. That's what a scientist is, someone who is interested in the pursuit of Truth. There is a lot of bad science right now and it will take years and years for science to recover completely. The scientific method holds the key to that recovery.

- Open data
- Reproducibility
- Responding to critics
- Admitting error

Most bad science doesn't pass the smell test and usually lacks all or some of the above. In times past, peer review was up to the task. Unfortunately, we are also dealing with the return of Mob rule. The loudest and shrillest hold sway and like the Eye of Sauron, no one can survive once they have focused their gaze on you. Racist, sexist, denialist shout the mob and theirs is the voice of anti-science and anti-rationalism. Data and common sense be damned.

Comment: Re:The thankless job of solving nonexisting proble (Score 1) 347

Okay, I'll bite. The model that you say matches reality only matches the low forecast for temperature and you may be right it does match that (minus the pause, which they admit they don't match). However, the low forecast is what was supposed to happen if CO2 emissions and concentrations were capped. They weren't. Therefore, I'm happy to say, the models do not match reality. You need both to match or you are just talking out your ass. Saying one of our 99 models matched part of reality is a really lame claim.

The effects of CO2 are logarithmic and most of the heating we should expect to see has already happened. Reality and science agree, yay!

Comment: Siphon water to the Salton Sea (Score 1, Troll) 173

Drop a pipe in the Pacific, run it over the mountains, maybe parallel to the road that descends into Palm Springs and refill that nasty smelling swamp. On the way down the hill you can generate electricity, desalinate, extract minerals and make sushi. Win, win, win and wasabi.

Death Valley is next. I'm pretty sure turtles float.

Comment: Re:"Exploding heads" (Score 1, Insightful) 297

by huckamania (#49008861) Attached to: Canadian Climate Scientist Wins Defamation Suit Against National Post

I would change my mind, if the world was warming at an accelerated rate, if the arctic was ice free, if the models matched reality, if the people in charge of the temperature records would stop cooling the past, etc, etc, etc...

I'm against hyperbole and trollish behavior on either side.

Comment: Null hypothesis (Score 1) 295

by huckamania (#48089245) Attached to: NASA Study: Ocean Abyss Has Not Warmed

No extra heat needs to be found because the earth is not warming any more than usual during the latter stages of an inter-glacial. Seems to fit the observed phenomenon.

Alternate explanation is that not all feedbacks are positive and the plant food that has been modeled to cause AGW is just a bit player. That also seems to fit the observed behavior as CO2 continues to rise but global temps have plateaued.

We can leave the door open to the 'oh shit' possibilities, but really, that's starting to feel shrill and played out.

Comment: Re:Sounds like a problem... (Score 1) 507

by huckamania (#45288323) Attached to: How Big Data Is Destroying the US Healthcare System

Yes, that's not a bad idea. I'd also like to see prosecutors not be allowed to make deals with defendants. My understanding is only the Governor of a state or the President can grant a pardon, so how can a lowly prosecutor make a deal with a defendant who has been charged by a grand jury? Grand juries should present charges and prosecutors should make cases.

Or maybe we should adopt the French system and just have courts whose job it is to arrive at the truth. The whole adversarial system of justice in the US is prone to abuse and usually produces results most people would consider to be unjust.

Comment: Obamacare and Rights (Score 1) 507

by huckamania (#45288301) Attached to: How Big Data Is Destroying the US Healthcare System

Obamacare introduces all kinds of new governmental rights.

The government now has the right to tax doctors who do not use digital media. My daughter, who just turned 9, has a doctor who uses a paper filing system. They have computers for other things, but he likes having paper files. He's told us he probably will be retiring soon. Punishing him for using paper is just one of the reasons.

The government now has the right to tax individuals for not purchasing a product. I can hardly wait until the Democrats get a solid majority again to see what new and interesting products they will want us plebes to purchase. Subsidized for the poor, sick and crazy, of course. We might be bankrupt by then but why should that stop them.

The government now has the right to force insurance companies to cover whatever the government wants them to cover. I think the insurance companies are hoping to get a Military-Industrial type relationship with the government where most of the spending is cooked into the budget and the only way to trim it is by sequester type of actions. Lots of mergers and name changes in the near future.

That's just three off the top of my head.

I just think it is funny that Europeans, and the rest of the world, spend so much time boo-hooing over US health care and the US in general.

Comment: Re:Somewhere 10,000 contractors get a call (Score 1) 250

by huckamania (#45249753) Attached to: Jeffrey Zients Appointed To Fix Healthcare.gov

I was responding to the idiot who said my insurance company is my doctor and pointing out how stupid a statement that is to make.

You make it sound like my doctor can't treat me. That there is some procedure he would recommend but can't because of the evil insurance company. Is this some argument in favor of the not-ACA? Because the not-ACA doesn't eliminate insurance companies. They are really happy about the not-ACA because now they can get rid of all their low-cost, low-margin plans and replace them with Gold, Silver and Bronze plans that have lots of things that most people will never use. Things like psychiatric care and birth control and gender reassignment surgery are now required to be covered.

And that's just the medical costs that America will pay. We are already seeing companies adopt 28 hour a week work minimums for part-timers, not to mention cutting back on full-time staff. Genius stuff this not-ACA, named after another genius. It's been almost a year since he was re-elected. Still waiting for that laser focus on the economy he promised during the election. Still waiting on the Buffet rule he really liked the sound of. Or does he just like the sound of his own voice.

Comment: Re:Somewhere 10,000 contractors get a call (Score 1) 250

by huckamania (#45246793) Attached to: Jeffrey Zients Appointed To Fix Healthcare.gov

4 is a lie. They didn't even have a finalized copy of the bill online until after they had passed it. It's a bad law. Mainly because we have a bunch of crap politicians who wouldn't recognize a good law if it bit them in the butt.

But go ahead and live the fantasy, but the ACA is nothing more than a fraudulent name placed on a poor piece of legislation.

Comment: Re:Somewhere 10,000 contractors get a call (Score 2) 250

by huckamania (#45246771) Attached to: Jeffrey Zients Appointed To Fix Healthcare.gov

Its the mandatory coverage levels that will sway most Americans to abandon this. Retirees don't need birth control. Most people don't need psychiatric care. Most people won't be seeking gender reassignment surgery. But now everyone has to pay for it and it isn't cheap.

Central planning sucks, no matter who is at the top.

An Ada exception is when a routine gets in trouble and says 'Beam me up, Scotty'.

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