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Classic Games (Games)

It's Time For the Descent Games Return 251

Posted by Soulskill
from the i-expect-a-kickstarter-project-within-the-week dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Gamers of a certain age will probably remember Descent, a game that combined first-person shooters with flight sims in a way that has never really been replicated. GameSpot has an article calling for a new entry in the Descent series, and it reminded me of all the stomach-churning battles I had as a kid (when the game wasn't bringing my 33MHz 486 to its knees). 'Here's where modern gaming innovations make Descent an even more tempting reboot. From the two-dimensional mines of Spelunky to the isometric caves of Path of Exile, procedurally generated levels help deliver fresh experiences to players in a number of genres. The mines of Descent would be perfect candidates for such creation, and they wouldn't have to be limited to the metallic walls and lunar geology of past Descent games.

Imagine exploring organic tunnels carved by some unknown alien creature, or floating past dazzling crystalline stalactites in pristine ancient caves. Perhaps the influences of Red Faction and Minecraft could also come into play as you bored your own shortcuts through layers of destructible sediment. All of Descent's dizzying navigation challenges could be even more exciting with the immersive potential of a virtual reality headset like the Oculus Rift or the Sony Morpheus. Feeling the mine walls close in on you from all sides could get your heart racing, and turning your head to spot shortcuts, power-ups, or delicate environmental details could greatly heighten the sense of being an explorer in an uncharted land.'"

Comment: Re:Innovation vs rent-seeking (Score 5, Insightful) 166

by hublan (#46890395) Attached to: SpaceX Wins Injunction Against Russian Rocket Purchases

SpaceX are fantastic, world-class innovators, but lobbying the government to tilt the playing field their way smacks of rent-seeking.

You're confused. It's called levelling the playing field. What the USAF did was sign a no-bid contract with the Boeing/Lockheed to purchase Russian rocket engines. A huge no-no in the public sphere, if not illegal. The only way to get them to reverse on that was to go to court.

Comment: Re:Stretching the laws for corporations (Score 2) 161

by hublan (#44215579) Attached to: Security Researchers Submit Brief For Andrew "Weev" Auernheimer

Whoa, easy on the vitriol there, bub. Don't let bad design cloud your judgment of the actual case. It matters not how badly the AT&T folks implemented security (or not) on their system. The fact is Weev "stole" it (copied without permission) and then stupidly publicized it. What's more, he "shared it with various interested parties."

If AT&T had left printouts of highly personal data in a dumpster and someone had found it right there, then I don't think you would've had a problem fingering the culprit. AT&T, right? Dumpster diving would certainly not get someone 41 months in the slammer (e.g California v Greenwood).

In other words, it was right there in the open. Hence, the blame lies squarely with AT&T for not properly securing their customers' private information.

As far as I'm concerned, anyone calling their group Goatse Security needs to be punished anyway. I'm not interested in trying to explain to my 6yo what the fuck that means.

Your obvious lack of parenting skills is not his responsibility.

Comment: Re:Say what? (Score 1) 226

by hublan (#38318390) Attached to: Why Android Upgrades Take So Long

The entire point of a HAL is that you just plug in your drivers.

The entire point of the HAL is to abstract hardware, any hardware, away from the OS. There's nothing that says it can't encompass more of the hardware than just the IO bus, CPU and MMU, like WinNT does. On an embedded device there's very little in terms of a standard IO bus that the OS can communicate through cleanly with peripherals, so might as well abstract the whole lot.

Comment: Re:The situation is much more complicated than tha (Score 1) 364

by hublan (#35093276) Attached to: Usage Based Billing In Canada To Be Rescinded

The unethical part, as far as I understand, is that smaller ISPs rent the "last mile" piece from Bell, which they're allowed to since the infrastructure is wholly, or partially, tax-payer funded. However, they don't buy big-pipe bandwidth from Bell, but instead peer with someone like Cogent. The cost of the bandwidth over the last mile is zero, since additional bytes don't degrade the infrastructure and therefore don't add to maintenance costs. However Bell wants to charge the ISP, for this zero-cost bandwidth, at the same scale as they charge their end-users, who, unlike the ISPs, *are* using their peering connection to talk to the rest of the internet.

Comment: Re:Japan (Score 1) 238

by hublan (#25961939) Attached to: BitTorrent Calls UDP Report "Utter Nonsense"

I keep seeing this population density argument being thrown out as if it has some sort of a bearing on the issue.

You're not going to be rolling 100Mbs fiber to each farm house in Montana, now are you?

The fact that ISPs in North-America (Canada included) are unable to do this even in areas with high population density, simply indicates that they want to keep the status quo as long as customers keep paying. There is no technical or logistical issue preventing them from doing it. It's all about abject lack of competition and the precious dollar. Trotting out the density argument is specious at best.

Comment: Re:Off topic, but I have to mention it (Score 1) 294

by hublan (#25832885) Attached to: Windows Breaks Into Supercomputer Top 10

Sure if you only implement the single-precision portion of IEEE-754 then you're still working with 32-bit quantities on an 8-bit computer. All that bit-jiggling really adds up quickly.

I once coded a fully IEEE-754 compliant single-precision floating point emulator for ARM which was about ~100 instructions on average per operation. And this is with an instruction set that handles 32-bit quantities natively.

Certification on the upswing again->

From feed by nffeed
After several years of decline, the demand for certification and training in GNU/Linux and other free software areas is stronger than ever. That's the general opinion of experts in the field, as they discuss where certification has been, current course offerings, customer services, and trends for the future.
Link to Original Source

Slowly and surely the unix crept up on the Nintendo user ...

Working...