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Comment *WIN-BATTERIES?!?* (Score 1) 38

Someone needs to punch this idea in the throat right now before it gets deployed anywhere.

Need I remind the membership of the decades-long clusterfsck resulting from so-called "Win-modems" whose codecs were moved from hardware into host software and to this day remain completely undocumented? Even people who put down hard cash for a WinModem driver found themselves left to twist in the wind when the 3.x kernel series came out (modems may be mostly obsolete, but FAXes aren't (yet)).

Now: Who would like to bet that the WinBattery interface will not significantly extend battery life over what we have now, remain completely undocumented (or trapped behind onerous licensing that forbids Open Source implementations), and leave Linux and *BSD users with systems with significantly shortened battery life because they can't control the power interface?

This is yet another naked attempt to bottle up critical system functionality behind a Microsoft-only wall (because apparently fscking everyone over with UEFI and (In-)Secure Boot wasn't enough).

Comment DO NOT WANT (Score 4, Interesting) 52

Let me see if I'm understanding this correctly.

You want me to install an invasive gaming client that delivers no actual game content to me, imposes a network lag on all input, does not allow me to run a zero-latency LAN gaming session, does not allow me to run my own public server for my friends... And your business model is to get me to pay for this degraded experience?

...Good luck.

Comment Re:overrides hostfile, meh (Score 1) 527

You do know that DNS queries can be directed to any DNS server, not just the default you get with your DHCP address assignment. There's no reason Microsoft would (or should) trust any DNS servers other than its own.

It seems like the most reliable option would be to null-route the IPs themselves at your gateway. (At which point, Microsoft opens a VPN tunnel via a third site. Rinse, recurse...)

Comment Re:Solution: (Score 2, Informative) 122

BWHA-HA-HAHAHAH!! Z0MG, you're so Hillary-ous!!

...Oh, wait:

Looks like e-Ghazi was a big nothing-burger. Which is what we dirty fscking hippies have been saying ever since it was first trotted out. But: Please continue, Governor. Don't let minor things like facts get in the way of a good right-wing misogynistic rant. Your lives are bleak and meaningless enough as it is.

Comment No One Knows What to Put There Instead (Score 1) 698

You'd prefer this, maybe?

That abomination was the keyboard Lenovo inflicted on the world on their Thinkpad Carbon X1 (2nd. gen). This presumably was green-lit by the same Very Serious People who approved the bundling of the SuperFish on "select" laptops.

Lenovo seems to have since learned their lesson; the Carbon X1 3rd gen has a proper keyboard, and proper buttons above the touchpad.

Comment YHBT. YHL. HAND. (Score 0) 434

Yet another malicious, deliberately inaccurate "leak" from Trey Gowdy's "investigation" into BENGHAZI!!!!1! (at least the seventh such investigation so far).

Here's what we know about this most recent "story" so far:

Oh, and explain to me again why this is on /. ? I thought this site was about tech and tech-related news. Could it be there's rank partisanship among the editorial staff? I mean, I can't recall seeing any front-page stories here about the comprehensive corruption of, say, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker who, among other things, installed a secret WiFi router in his office so he could exchange email out of sight of mandatory records keeping laws. I mean, that's tech-related, right? Right??

Comment Re:Bad Summary, Only new part is the sharing optio (Score 5, Interesting) 487

First, we're only talking Windows 10 PHONE


First: This is in Windows 10 desktop, as detailed here, complete with screenshots:

Second: Even if this were only confined to Windows Phone 10, it would still be monumentally stupid.

Comment Re:third solution the MS doesn't want to mention (Score 3, Insightful) 487


There is no provision in this "killer feature" that establishes whether the person doing the sharing is the network administrator, i.e. the person who grants authorization to use their network. So if you share your WAP credentials with a friend, and that friend uses Windows 10 with Wi-Fi Sense enabled, than that friend has just compromised your WAP.

Comment Re:No (Score 5, Informative) 487

ahhhh no, for networks you have SELECTED to share it can do it. [ ... ]


Wi-Fi Sense's default settings are to share everything, all the time. Indeed, Microsoft's rules for shipping Windows Phone 8.1 requires OEMs to turn this "killer feature" fully on. Expecting users to have the presence of mind to turn this off is willfully disingenuous.

Submission + - Windows 10 to Share WiFi Credentials by Default?

ewhac writes: Even those of us who reflexively (and correctly) bash Microsoft every chance we get are having trouble wrapping our heads around this one. It seems that the latest build of Windows 10 has a new feature called Wi-Fi Sense which, by default, will share your WiFi connection profiles and credentials with all your Facebook friends, and Skype and contacts.

Wi-Fi Sense is apparently a feature that first appeared on Windows Phone 8.1, and is described by Managing Editor Sam Sabri in this Windows Central article from last year — without irony or sarcasm — as a, "killer feature." The apparent use case for this "killer feature" is to more conveniently share the connection credentials to your own WAP with your friends. If, however, you would prefer your WAP's info to not be shared, you have but to append the string "_optout" to your SSID (no solution is provided for people whose SSIDs are already near the 32-character limit). The WinPhone version of Wi-Fi Sense reportedly does not display the WAP's password to recipients but, since recipients can connect, the password is (probably) stored using a symmetric cipher and, thus, can be easily extracted. Wi-Fi Sense will also automagically click through any ToS page that typically appears on public WiFi access points (thus destroying any remaining illusion of meaningful assent to such so-called contracts).

Wi-Fi Sense can apparently be turned off completely, but its default state appears to be enabled and sharing everything. It is unclear how much, if any, of this "killer feature" will be in the final release of Windows 10.

"Now this is a totally brain damaged algorithm. Gag me with a smurfette." -- P. Buhr, Computer Science 354