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Google

+ - Google's 2nd Android Developer Contest kicksoff 1

Submitted by coffeeisclassy
coffeeisclassy (991791) writes "Google's second Android Developer Contest (ADC2) has started, despite some confusion around how to submit applications. The prizes are different from the first ADC, with each category having prizes of 100k, 50k, and 25k and an overall best of 150k,50k and 25k, meaning the best Android application from ADC2 is eligible for ~250k. The rules seem to allow any application never published before August 1st to compete and is open through the end of August (so break out your keyboards!). The top prizes are certainly less than that of first ADC, but with the prizes broken down by category Google may be hoping to inspire some love for less popular categories. While some other developers are waiting to find out to submit, one developer has moved ahead and released one of there entires Pigs Can Fly Site Monitor (also on Google Market for those with Androids). So if you've been waiting for an excuse to start a new side-project, here you have it :)"
Cellphones

+ - DeviceScape port to OpenMoko finished & availa

Submitted by crazyirishhobo
crazyirishhobo (1130599) writes "As slashdot reported awhile ago on the start of a port of device scape to the OpenMoko, the port is now been completed and is available for public download. However like other things in the OpenMoko community (including the phones), it appears that it has reached the end of the line, with the developer behind it apparently moving to the Android platform."
Privacy

+ - Your browser history is showing

Submitted by tiffanydanica
tiffanydanica (1347719) writes "For a lot of us our browser history is something we consider private, or at least not something we want to expose to every website we visit.Web2.0collage is showing just how easy it is (with code!)for sites to determine what sites you visit. When you visit the site it sniffs your browser history, and creates a collage of the (safe for work) sites that you visit. It is an interesting application of potentially scary technology (imagine a job application site using this to screen candidates). You can jump right into having your history sniffed if you so desire. While the collages are cool on their own merit, they also serve as an illustration of the privacy implications of browser history sniffing."
Privacy

+ - Generating Meta-collages from browser history

Submitted by bobdole3k
bobdole3k (666) writes "With some simple javascript & scheme code (under the AGPL) its possible to sniff a users browser history. A new browser history sniffing site uses this to generate a collage of the sites you visit. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot/blogging habits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, the collage also serves as a cool illustration of the privacy concerns surrounding browser history sniffing."
Privacy

+ - Browser history sniffing illustrated

Submitted by Anonymous Pants
Anonymous Pants (666) writes "A new open-source website, Web2.0 Collage, illustrates just how easy browser sniffing is. Once it's gotten a list of all the sites you visit it constructs a (somewhat creepy) collage graphically illustrating the websites you visit. Depending on your browser history the results can be nifty or creepy (fortunately it does use a filtered SFW list). While the results on it own are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing."
Privacy

+ - Sniffing browser history for awareness & art

Submitted by tdalek
tdalek (990756) writes "web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and then creates a collage of them. While the collage is kind of nifty, it also graphically illustrates just how easy it is for people to sniff your browser history. Before you get too worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habits). However, just because these people play nice is no guarantee that everyone else will. Other potential benign applications including customizing bookmark-lets, but the less than benign (say advertising or even hr site) implications or troublesome. An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For slashdotters not interested in warnings or explanations, you can jump straight to the browser history sniffing"
The Internet

+ - Browser sniffing ninjas

Submitted by tasteyf00dninja
tasteyf00dninja (1327219) writes "web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning & explanation screen and go straight to the browser history sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing."
Security

+ - The art of browser history sniffing

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "There is a new kid in town doing something a bit different. web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick. While the results by them selves are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing."
Security

+ - Browser historry sniffing demoed by web2.0collage

Submitted by crazyirishhobo
crazyirishhobo (1130599) writes "Browser history sniffing isn't the newest thing on the block, but web2.0collage.com takes a different approach to browser history sniffing. Once it's gotten a list of all the sites you visit it constructs a (somewhat creepy) collage graphically illustrating the websites you visit. Depending on your browser history the results can be nifty or creepy (fortunately it does use a filtered SFW list). While the results on it own are kind of interesting, it also serves as a cool way to illustrate the privacy concerns of browser history sniffing."
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Collages of sniffed browser history for !privacy

Submitted by hkarau
hkarau (990400) writes "web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and then creates a collage of them. While the collage is kind of nifty, it also graphically illustrates just how easy it is for people to sniff your browser history. Before you get too worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habits). However, just because these people play nice is no guarantee that everyone else will. Other potential benign applications including customizing bookmark-lets, but the less than benign (say advertising or even hr site) implications or troublesome. An interesting application of potentially scary technology."
The Internet

+ - Sniffing browser history for art

Submitted by
holdenkarau
holdenkarau writes "You may remember previous slashdot discussions on browser history sniffing, but there is a new kid in town doing something a bit different. web2.0collage.com uses similar browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit and creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a list of "web2.0" sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology. For those wanting to skip the warning screen and go straight to the browser sniffing this should do the trick."
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - web2.0collage uses sniffed browser history for art

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "web2.0collage.com uses browser history sniffing to determine what websites you visit (that has been discussed on slashdot before) and then creates a collage of them. Before you get worried, it uses a white-list of SFW sites, so the collage will (probably) be appropriate (unless you don't want your colleagues knowing about your slashdot habbits). An interesting application of potentially scary technology."
Privacy

+ - Iranian protestors using TOR, revitalize project-> 1

Submitted by
Death Metal
Death Metal writes "Iranians seeking to share videos and other eyewitness accounts of the demonstrations that have roiled their country since disputed elections two weeks ago are using an Internet encryption program originally developed by and for the U.S. Navy.

Designed a decade ago to secure Internet communications between U.S. ships at sea, The Onion Router, or TOR, has become one of the most important proxies in Iran for gaining access to Web sites such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook."

Link to Original Source
Education

+ - 'Microsoft Subsidy' Cuts Tuition for H-1B Families

Submitted by
theodp
theodp writes "If you're a U.S. citizen, but not a permanent resident of Washington State, your kids will pay $24,367-a-year (pdf) if they want to attend the University of Washington. But if you're in the U.S. on a temporary H-1B or L visa, you, your spouse, and your kids will soon be able to pay only $7,692-a-year to attend UW thanks to HB 1487, which has been dubbed the 'Microsoft Subsidy Bill'. Sponsored by former Microsoft exec Ross Hunter, the bill stands to benefit the families of thousands of Microsoft workers. Lydia Tamez — associate general counsel and director of global migration at Microsoft — defended the bill, explaining that it will not only make life easier for H-1B employees who rely on Microsoft for their sole income, but also address the concerns of Microsoft guest workers who want to earn MBAs or second degrees, but balk at having to pay out-of-state tuition rates. Not all are impressed by her argument. The 'emergency' law (deja vu, anyone?), which legislators deemed 'necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions,' takes effect on July 1."

Imitation is the sincerest form of plagarism.

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