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+ - DOJ Offers $3 Million Reward for Gameover Zeus Botnet Suspect->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "The U.S. Department of Justice and the Department of State’s Transnational Organized Crime Rewards Program announced on Tuesday that they are offering a $3 million reward for information leading to the arrest or conviction of a Russian man suspected of having served as an administrator for the destructive Gameover Zeus botnet. Evgeniy Mikhailovich Bogachev is charged in the U.S. with several crimes related to Gameover Zeus, which targeted banking credentials and other personal information over a two-year period."
Link to Original Source

+ - I'm Done With Twitter 1

Submitted by PainMeds
PainMeds (1301879) writes "Forensic scientist and author Jonathan Zdziarski has abandoned Twitter, citing intentional ignoring of repeated and widespread abuse complaints involving criminal threatening, death threats, and a myriad of other abuses of the service to harass users. "Twitter’s response was not only insufficient, but downright disgusting." ... "I even managed to find a couple still-live tweets containing death threats. Twitter will make excuses until there are no more to make, and then they will just stop talking to you altogether." Zdziarski also provides a number of tips for responding to such threats, having been through it himself, including contacting the police to alert them of possible SWAT attempts, and planning for good disaster recovery. "If I get hacked some day, I just don’t care You should be this confident – not in your security, but in your disaster recovery. ""

+ - Computer chess created in 487 bytes, breaks 32-year-old record->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The record for smallest computer implementation of chess on any platform was held by 1K ZX Chess, which saw a release back in 1983 for the Sinclair ZX81. It uses just 672 bytes of memory, and includes most chess rules as well as a computer component to play against.

The record held by 1K ZX Chess for the past 32 years has just been beaten this week by the demoscene group Red Sector Inc. They have implemented a fully-playable version of chess called BootChess in just 487 bytes."

Link to Original Source

+ - Sloppy File Permissions Make Red Star Vulnerable

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Red Star OS Desktop 3.0, the official Linux distro of North Korea, which recently found its way onto torrents and various download sites in form of an ISO image, is interesting for a number of reasons, including its attempt to look like commercial operating systems (currently OS X, earlier versions mimicked the Windows GUI). Hackers are also poking Red Star for security vulnerabilities. An pseudonymous researcher noted in a post to the Open Source Software Security (oss-sec) mailing list, that the OS has one significant security hole: Red Star 3.0 ships with a world-writeable udev rule file /etc/udev/rules.d/85-hplj10xx.rules (originally designed for HP LaserJet 1000 series printers) which can be modified to include RUN+= arguments executing arbitrary commands as root by Udev. In the post he also mentions how the older Red Star 2.0 shipped with another schoolboy mistake: /etc/rc.d/rc.sysinit was world-writeable."

+ - Terrestrial Gamma Ray Bursts Very Common

Submitted by Rambo Tribble
Rambo Tribble (1273454) writes "It was long thought that gamma ray bursts were the exclusive province of deep space sources. More recently it was found that storms could produce such emissions, but such occurrences were thought rare. Now, data from NASA's Fermi satellite suggest such events happen over a thousand times a day. Per Prof. Joseph Dwyer, from the University of New Hampshire, "These are big, monster bursts of gamma rays, and one would think these must be monster storms producing them. But that's not the case. Even boring-looking, garden-variety, little storms can produce these.""

+ - We most certainly did not just find dark matter

Submitted by StartsWithABang
StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "There seems to be a formula for this very specific extraordinary claim: point your high-energy telescope at the center of a galaxy or cluster of galaxies, discover an X-ray or gamma ray signal that you can't account for through conventional, known astrophysics, and claim you've detected dark matter! Only, these results never pan out; they've turned out either to be due to conventional sources or simply non-detections every time. There's a claim going around the news based on this paper recently that we've really done it this time, and yet that's not even physically possible, as our astrophysical constraints already rule out a particle with this property as being the dark matter!"

+ - Car thieves and insurers vote on keyless car security

Submitted by RockDoctor
RockDoctor (15477) writes "The BBC are reporting that Britain's car thieves, rapidly followed by Britain's car insurance companies, have been expressing their opinions on the security of keyless car entry and/or control systems. The thieves are happy to steal them (often using equipment intended for dealer maintenance of the vehicles) and in consequence the insurance companies are refusing to insure such vehicles (or to accept new policies on such vehicles) unless they are parked overnight in underground (or otherwise secured) car parks.

So, I guess I won't be considering buying one of those for another generation. If ever."

+ - Washington Post Says Marijuana Legalization is Making the World a Better Place 3

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Christopher Ingraham writes in the Washington Post that many countries are taking a close look at what's happening in Colorado and Washington state to learn lessons that can be applied to their own situations and so far, the news coming out of Colorado and Washington is overwhelmingly positive. Dire consequences predicted by reform opponents have failed to materialize. If anything, societal and economic indicators are moving in a positive direction post-legalization. Colorado marijuana tax revenues for fiscal year 2014-2015 are on track to surpass projections.

Lisa Sanchez, a program manager at México Unido Contra la Delincuencia, a Mexican non-profit devoted to promoting "security, legality and justice," underscored how legalization efforts in the U.S. are having powerful ripple effects across the globe: events in Colorado and Washington have "created political space for Latin American countries to have a real debate [about drug policy]." She noted that motivations for reform in Latin America are somewhat different than U.S. motivations — one main driver is a need to address the epidemic of violence on those countries that is fueled directly by prohibitionist drug war policies. Mexico's president has given signs he's open to changes in that country's marijuana laws to help combat cartel violence. Sandeep Chawla, former deputy director of the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime, notes that one of the main obstacles to meaningful reform is layers of entrenched drug control bureaucracies at the international and national levels — just in the U.S., think of the DEA, ONDCP and NIDA, among others — for whom a relaxation of drug control laws represents an undermining of their reason for existence: "if you create a bureaucracy to solve a particular problem, when the problem is solved that bureaucracy is out of a job.""

Comment: APRS, Samba and streaming police scanner traffic (Score 1) 146

by hohosforbreakfast (#48132109) Attached to: Raspberry Pi Sales Approach 4 Million

Not bad for $50! (I bought an 8GB SD card preloaded with NOOBS and a case as well.) We're off grid here at Breitenbush, so the fact that it's easy on the power consumption is a big plus. I'm not sure if there's a daughtercard for this, but more memory would be nice. Mine uses aprx to act as an I-Gate for APRS and drives a TNC-X built from a kit (http://www.tnc-x.com/) and takes audio from the scanner from a USB Signalink (http://www.tigertronics.com/slusbmain.htm) which has a few extra features that make it really nice for this app. Y'all already know about Samba.

Comment: Re:Stupid (Score 1) 3

by hohosforbreakfast (#48131935) Attached to: Protecting Corporate Data...When an Employee Leaves

It's not about employees deciding to leave, more about being shown the door in HR. Some of the article is nothing new, but it brings up a good point about tracking access to external sites and securing those accounts when an employee is fired. It also brings up the quagmire of securing BYOD. (Warning: also has a couple of product placements for the company on whose blog this article is written.)

+ - Protecting Corporate Data...When an Employee Leaves 3

Submitted by Esther Schindler
Esther Schindler (16185) writes "When someone leaves the company, the HR department is quick to grab the employee's laptop. But what about the data on other equipment? How can the organization know what's on her mobile devices? Does anyone know to which websites and cloud-based software the employee has access? This article discusses how IT (working with HR) can help ensure the company's data doesn't walk out the front door.

Which raises the question of whether it's possible for IT to even know what external logins an employee has, and whether the effort to track all that is worth the time to do so. While everyone said, "Treat people right and they won't want to do anything malicious with the company data," isn't the implication that it only takes one bad experience...?"

+ - X-37B to land on Tuesday

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "After twenty-two months in orbit, on its second space mission, the Air Force plans to bring the X-37B back to Earth this coming Tuesday.

The exact time and date will depend on weather and technical factors, the Air Force said in a statement released on Friday. The X-37B space plane, also known as the Orbital Test Vehicle, blasted off for its second mission aboard an unmanned Atlas 5 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Dec. 11, 2012. The 29-foot-long (9-meter) robotic spaceship, which resembles a miniature space shuttle, is an experimental vehicle that first flew in April 2010. It returned after eight months. A second vehicle blasted off in March 2011 and stayed in orbit for 15 months.

"

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