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Comment Technology in the Volvo - Why I don't use it (Score 1) 417

Have a Volvo and it has the Sensus 3.0 stuff in it, which includes apps such as Pandora and a few others. The tech package came with a 6 month trial for everything, but that has since expired and I don't drive enough to make it worth it. What's frustrating is that it won't even let you pair it with your hotspot phone to use those apps, so it is just a complete waste of money to have it in the car. The tech is also slow, interface created by committee, and NOT car friendly. Give me Google Maps with a Siri interface and that's it. I should be able to say "find the nearest Arby's restaurant" and that's it. Garmin Nav or any iPhone/Android navigation app is much easier to use.

The main issue is that people see the technology as a way for car makers to extract more money from you AFTER you've already shelled out 20, 30, 40, or 50k for their car. That is just crazy. Car manufacturers need to include these as actual features instead of a way to get money out of your wallet.

This would be akin to giving you free air conditioning for 6 months, but if you want it to work after that then you have to pay a monthly fee. We bought the car, I don't want to keep paying for that. If you can't do that, then take it out of the car, reduce the price of the car, then people will be happier about it.

Comment Scan for malicious files without MitM? (Score 3, Informative) 56

While man-in-the-middle SSL connections sound like something everyone should be against, those in the corporate environment rely on using an in-line scanner to check for malicious/virus files going in/out the corporate environment. Those entities need to be able to block/report on where those file originated and their final destination. To do that, they rely on the scanning device being the SSL endpoint in order to decrypt and inspect the content. I would hope that this ability will be configurable via AD policy to allow the corporate MitM certificate to be considered trusted; however, there are an increasing number of sites that have javascript which verifies the SSL connection and checks that there is no MitM SSL occuring. While it sounds safe, it actually HELPS virus/malware authors if browsers block MitM connections to ssl sites.

An SSL cert is like $5 from Comodo, so if all browsers checked for MitM connections and prevented access, then corporations can't protect their networks from content on an SSL connection and would have to trust all content from the interwebs.

There are security ramifications to increased security.

Comment Full Disclosure, please? (Score 3, Insightful) 69

As an admin, I'd love to see the actual technical aspects of the breach. How did they get in? How did they compromise your security? How long were they in the system before being detected? How did you detect them? Were you logging information that did catch them, but some oversight caused that data to be missed? How do you KNOW they are out of the system without flattening the entire infrastructure?

Knowing this data can help security professionals add more security layers to keep the evil-doers out of the network.

Comment The US = Land of the Lawyers (Score 5, Interesting) 580

Here's your main reason:

If ONE person is injured/killed within a 10 mile radius of a theater and the person doing the killing proclaims any notion of it being done because of the release of the movie, the relatives of the one shot will sue Sony for millions of dollars due to the release of the film that Sony KNEW could unleash terrorism. Imagine if it happened at 5 locations? What about one nutjob in one theater ala the Batman movie a few years ago? Sony would be put at fault for blatantly disregarding public safety by knowingly releasing a film. It's the same reason newspapers won't print an image of Mohammed or that South Park had to pull an episode that was going to show Mohammed.

Hyper-sensitivity to everything for fear of litigation.

Comment NSA has the ssl keys (Score 4, Insightful) 279

The NSA likely has keys from all the major SSL cert vendors, rendering this "spamvertisement" moot. HTTPS does not mean that you're secure from everybody. It means you've added a layer of security that will thwart MOST prying eyes, but those that really want to know what you're doing WILL know what you're doing.

What a silly thing to appear on slashdot.

Comment Not for long (Score 1) 126

Knock knock.
Whose there?
It's the government.
It's the government, who?
It's the government and we're here for our GPS units. Hand them over or be labeled a terrorist.

Look, some high up government person is going to read this, realize that some national security breach has potentially occurred, then send in the troops to reclaim those units. This won't take long.

Some people need to feel important.

Comment Hello? Security? (Score 2) 75

If it is light flashes, what's to prevent someone from snooping it from afar? Convenient technology often means insecure technology. Weird to develop a product just because one of the major phone vendors don't support a protocol. Seems like that vendor should add that feature to their phones, rather than re-invent a new protocol.

Comment It can't be due to being older (Score 1) 341

Just because some of us are older and don't have time to finish games, what about the kids out there that don't have full-time jobs and families? There are way more gamers under 18 than when I was a kid. The answer isn't simply that we have jobs and families now, the answer is probably that kids today have tons of things that demand their attention and so finishing games is low on the priority list.

Facebook profiles, "farming", city-building, etc. all are time sucks that prevent even the kids from dedicating the necessary time to finish a game.

"There are things that are so serious that you can only joke about them" - Heisenberg