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Submission + - Six months without Adobe Flash, and I feel fine (

hessian writes: "As documented on /., six months ago I de-installed the Adobe FlashTM player on all my browsers.

This provoked some shock and incredulity from others. After all, Flash has been an essential content interpreter for over a decade. It filled the gap between an underdeveloped JavaScript and the need for media content like animation, video and so on."

Open Source

Submission + - Ten Simple Rules for the Open Development of Scientific Software (

hessian writes: "Open-source software development has had significant impact, not only on society, but also on scientific research. Papers describing software published as open source are amongst the most widely cited publications (e.g., BLAST [1], [2] and Clustal-W [3]), suggesting many scientific studies may not have been possible without some kind of open software to collect observations, analyze data, or present results. It is surprising, therefore, that so few papers are accompanied by open software, given the benefits that this may bring.

Publication of the source code you write not only can increase your impact [4], but also is essential if others are to be able to reproduce your results. Reproducibility is a tenet of computational science [5], and critical for pipelines employed in data-driven biological research. Publishing the source for the software you created as well as input data and results allows others to better understand your methodology, and why it produces, or fails to produce, expected results. Public release might not always be possible, perhaps due to intellectual property policies at your or your collaborators' institutes; and it is important to make sure you know the regulations that apply to you. Open licensing models can be incredibly flexible and do not always prevent commercial software release [5]."


Submission + - Why does Mozilla behave like Microsoft? (

hessian writes: "The Mozilla home page has some blather about how because they are a non-profit, they are not manipulative in order to enforce market needs.

Then why is it, when I specified an alternate location for the Mozilla 10 installation, the installer over-wrote an entirely separate installation of the Mozilla 3.6 software?

That's the kind of thing Microsoft would do."

Building translators is good clean fun. -- T. Cheatham