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+ - How 1980s hackers used bulletin boards to learn about heavy metal->

Submitted by hessian
hessian (467078) writes ""In the 80s, BBSes were the most important thing to the hacker world. They were where people met, talked, exchanged information," said legendary hacker Erik Bloodaxe, whose exploits with the hacker group Legion of Doom stirred many imaginations back in the day. "They were the central meeting places where you could find those people who actually cared about the same things you cared about."

"Most of the people in my peer group would be calling bulletin boards daily and were phone phreaks, so their long-distance calls were free. It was basically like being a regular on 4chan or Reddit, but thirty years ago. So we would talk about niche topics like metal that were very hard to find out about unless you, say, lived in a big city or college town and knew the right people/right places to go," said Grandmaster Ratte, a member of the Cult of the Dead Cow well-regarded in hacker circles. "Instead, you had access to people from all over the world, many of whom were very knowledgeable. I learned about tons of interesting subcultures via BBSs that I never would have known about until the Internet came along," he added."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:MOD PARENT UP! (Score 1) 123

by hessian (#46989877) Attached to: How To Approve the Use of Open Source On the Job

Don't expect support-contract-like behaviour from a list - remember they're volunteers, there's no "SLA" and they don't work for you.

Ah, the old "bad behavior exists, therefore your example must be of the bad behavior"!

No.

I've (repeatedly) seen people go on to these lists, ask a polite question, and receive STFU NEWB or analogue response very quickly.

Generally, the more difficult the question the more likely it is to receive this response.

Ever wonder why Stack Overflow is so popular? Volunteers there get imaginary internet karma points and so have incentive to answer questions.

You usually get a better answer at Stack Overflow than from the official lists.

But few businesses want to rely on a software plan that begins "And if there's a problem, we know this INTERNET FORUM..."

Investors will panic and flee the room, with good reason.

Comment: Probably hire a range of people (Score 0) 466

You only need one 9/10 to organize the project and avoid pitfalls.

Everyone else can write the bog-standard code that doesn't improve between someone with a 5/10 and a 10/10, or at least not by any metric measurable for business logic.

So they offer the 7/10s half what the 9/10 makes, and hire on a 5:1 ratio.

Comment: Government attracts parasites (Score 4, Insightful) 143

by hessian (#46954771) Attached to: How Dumb Policies Scare Tech Giants Away From Federal Projects

First, there's all the rules that make sure rules first go to minority- or female-owned companies, or to companies in at risk zones.

Next there's all the regulation.

Next there's government slowness. It's not market responsive.

The result is that people who are interested in running a business go away, UNLESS their business model is making money off government by charging it extra for all of its special demands.

It's no wonder the DC area is growing faster than anywhere else and salaries are higher there.

Comment: Re: The historical cycle (Score 1) 255

by hessian (#46954761) Attached to: Melbourne Uber Drivers Slapped With $1700 Fines; Service Shuts Down

Like many political ideas - most noteworthy being communism - they sound good when you think about them on a local scale, where everyone knows everyone else personally, but once you start adding in layers of detachment the rules break down very quickly; the "best and the brightest" aren't likely to win very often when fighting sociopaths.

Maybe we need to localize then. Divide up into units of 150 people and make those part of a pyramid all the way up to someone at top.

If only there was some system of government in history that had done this...

Comment: Design standards (Score 1) 71

by hessian (#46949719) Attached to: Electromagnetic Noise Found To Affect Bird Navigation

There's a difference between "good enough" and "elegant" when it comes to design.

Our society is a chaotic blast of all sorts of noise, from physical sound waves, to electromagnetics, to sheer ugliness.

It doesn't reflect a consistent design philosophy.

The high number of electromagnetic wave emitters inevitably creates other problems as well. But we're so focused on "good enough" that we ignore this.

Comment: The historical cycle (Score 5, Insightful) 255

by hessian (#46948539) Attached to: Melbourne Uber Drivers Slapped With $1700 Fines; Service Shuts Down

Step 1:

Get rid of all regulation.

Free market, yo.

Step 2:

A young girl is murdered and rape in a cab in a horrific fashion.

The democracy demands solutions!

Step 3:

Regulate. When that doesn't work, regulate some more.

Step 4:

Prices are high and a de facto exclusive license exists. People notice this is bad and want deregulation.

+ - Election candidate arrested over Churchill speech->

Submitted by hessian
hessian (467078) writes "A candidate in the European elections has been arrested after making a speech quoting from a book by Winston Churchill about Islam.

Paul Weston, chairman of the far right Liberty GB party, was making the speech on the steps of Winchester Guildhall, Hampshire, on Saturday, when a member of the public complained to police and he was arrested.

He had been reading from Churchill's book The River War, written in 1899 while he was a British army officer in Sudan."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Funded with traffic tickets (Score 1) 664

by hessian (#46914571) Attached to: Death Wish Meets GPS: iPhone Theft Victims Confronting Perps

US police are woefully underfunded. They might get a bunch of SWAT stuff from the government, but actual basic policing, substations, and other items needed to process all but murders and attempted murders are not funded. Most cities are far more interested in making sure the professional sport league has the latest and greatest stadium so they won't move to a city that would. So, blame the city councils that deny adequate funding to city services, not the people who have to decide between catching the perps from a drive-by shooting versus some guy who lost his cellphone.

The unpopular truth is that "We The People" don't want to vote for the actual funding required for police departments, because that would require us to admit how much crime runs among us and take a more seriously look at certain egalitarian illusions.

Instead, we've made police dependent on and drunken with money from traffic tickets and drug forfeitures, which is a dishonest way of doing things.

Given the choice between a complex truth and an easy lie, voters (as a group) always pick the lie.

Don't blame cops for what the voters did.

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