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Submission + - How H-1B Visas Are Screwing Tech Workers (

hessian writes: "To be sure, America's tech economy has long depended on foreign-born workers. "Immigrants have founded 40 percent of companies in the tech sector that were financed by venture capital and went on to become public in the U.S., among them Yahoo, eBay, Intel, and Google," writes Laszlo Bock, Google's senior VP of "people operations," which, along with other tech giants such as HP and Microsoft, strongly supports a big increase in H-1B visas. "In 2012, these companies employed roughly 560,000 workers and generated $63 billion in sales."

But in reality, most of today's H-1B workers don't stick around to become the next Albert Einstein or Sergey Brin. ComputerWorld revealed last week that the top 10 users of H-1B visas last year were all offshore outsourcing firms such as Tata and Infosys. Together these firms hired nearly half of all H-1B workers, and less than 3 percent of them applied to become permanent residents. "The H-1B worker learns the job and then rotates back to the home country and takes the work with him," explains Ron Hira, an immigration expert who teaches at the Rochester Institute of Technology. None other than India's former commerce secretary once dubbed the H-1B the "outsourcing visa.""


Submission + - Architecture versus pattern recognition in programming (

hessian writes: "Most programming is a variant of “cut and paste” programming. You find the archetype you’re looking for, adapt it, and then paste it into the program from a mixture of sample code and blog posts. It works; you move on.

The problem with each of these method is that they’re limited role. The programmer is the only one involved in how the project works; the major architectural factors unique to the project are removed; and, it’s difficult for others to participate."


Submission + - Musicians support piracy, think it more profitable than music biz (

hessian writes: "The harsh reality is that too many prey on us – in a hostile environment – we have no other choice than to rise up.

We have no beef with "curious cats" who tune in on unauthorized channels, download torrents etc. Such undertakings serve a similar purpose to that of labels and distributors – from which we see such a minuscule yield anyway. Forget about it.

We encourage all conscientious music fans to buy their music direct from artists whenever that is possible, in the future. It will help more than you know."


Submission + - Euro zone falls into second recession since 2009 (

hessian writes: "The euro zone debt crisis dragged the bloc into its second recession since 2009 in the third quarter despite modest growth in Germany and France, data showed on Thursday.

The French and German economies both managed 0.2 percent growth in the July-to-September period but their resilience could not save the 17-nation bloc from contraction as the likes of The Netherlands, Spain, Italy and Austria shrank."


Submission + - Diversity may be fatal, says new government health study (

hessian writes: "Alvarez’s study reviewed the health records of 2,367 Mexican-Americans and 2,790 African-Americans older than 65, and concluded they lived longer if they inhabited a community mostly populated by their group.

African-Americans “living in a county with an ethnic density of 50% or more were 46% less likely to report doctor-diagnosed heart disease and 77% less likely to report cancer than those who lived in an ethnic density of less than 25%,” said a summary of the report, authored by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health."


Submission + - Why Linux failed to take over desktop computing ( 2

hessian writes: "A historical shift has occurred. The prices of computers have fallen, which means that the price of the operating system is no longer an impediment. As a result, many Linux devs have moved over to using OS X machines and most of the consumer world has moved to Windows 7, which fixes the problems of prior versions of Windows and may be the most popular version ever.

As a result, the battle is over. Linux remains with the geeks, and the desktop goes to Microsoft and Apple.

This delineates the eternal divide between geek and regular user: the geek wants to use the computer, the regular user wants to use the computer to do something. They want the operating system to “just work.”"

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