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Comment: "That's a great business model, Louis, (Score 1) 288

by hercubus (#39702885) Attached to: Paramount Claims Louis CK "Didn't Monetize"

It'd be a shame if something were to happen to your web page, or your servers, or your genitalia..."

Given the gigantic hole Mr. C.K. just punched through the unreality bubble that LA-LA Land executives live in, our hero Louis is probably lucky he hasn't been banned from the talk show circuit, blacklisted and/or shot through the head

I've see Louis talking about this ("I've never had a million dollars before. It's weird...") and he talks like he -expects- to have his career thrown under the bus

Mr. C.K. has done everyone who isn't a V.P. of corporate shenanigans a great service by demonstrating his proof-of-concept. And go Jim Gaffigan!!!

Comment: Re:Chrome vs IE (Score 1) 212

by hercubus (#39584369) Attached to: Chrome Beats Internet Explorer On Any Given Sunday

... I'm one of those IT control freaks. There's a good reason for it ...

No there isn't a good reason for it. You have good reasons for not supporting Chrome, but not a good reason for scouring it off.

The freaks in control of my work machine turned Java off in IE, pushed that little rule to -every- workstation. I have a deadline that requires me to connect to a work-mandated site that uses Java applets. See the disconnect there?

I suppose you might imagine that you are way too smart to allow your restrictions to hinder job performance or even make tasks impossible. You're not that smart. No one can keep on top of every detail. That's why allowing a little freedom can increase productivity, especially for the employees who are actually smart enough to print a PDF. Not all of us "users" are that stupid and your bias that we are all that stupid is just that, bias.

Comment: GIAA (Score 1) 95

by hercubus (#39104679) Attached to: Commercial, USB-Powered DNA Sequencer Coming This Year

Dear Doctor Amy Farrah Fowler,

The Genetics Industry Association of America (GIAA) understands you have been using a "genetic sequencer" device to decode genetic sequences that members of our association own as their intellectual property.

We are reminding you that your activities are strictly prohibited as you do not have a license for the sequences in question. We therefore require you to CEASE AND DESIST all such activities and destroy all devices you have been using to illegally decode other's intellectual property.

Attached please find an invoice for 30 million US dollars for fines, damages, legal fees, etcetera.

Most sincerely,

THE GENETICS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION OF AMERIKA (GIAA)

Comment: Re:wrong (Score 1) 337

by hercubus (#38985095) Attached to: FBI File Notes Steve Jobs' Reality Distortion Field

... he should be an honorary member of the Chinese Communist Party

Right, because Apple is the only company that found it had to move manufacturing to China. Apple was actually pretty late to the party in China, I believe they kept manufacturing in America longer than a lot of companies did. (party pun intended)

Whatever we do, let us not wonder what it is about our national character (I want stuff cheap) or our national trends (cutting local labor _always_ boosts stock price) or national policies (yes we subsidize moving jobs overseas) that creates a situation where a whole buttload of manufacturing went to China, including Apple's

Comment: Re:The Laws Of Personal Finance (Score 1) 196

by hercubus (#38784709) Attached to: Banks Using Mobile Phone Usage To Gauge Credit Risk

  1. Avoid all debt [ homeless / live in a box ]
  2. Avoid all debt [ walk / never own a car ]
  3. Avoid all debt [ lose / no credit benefits ]
  4. Profit! [ small / less profit and quality than you could have ]

congrats! you're now a small, on-foot, homeless loser who minimized a trivial expense and lowered your income potential and your quality of life. w00t?

okay, seriously, debt is a tool, not a sin. as a tool, you can injure yourself with it or build something useful. and to throw another cliche, for every problem there is a short, simple solution that's wrong. or in your case, not exactly wrong, just sub-optimal

H. A. N. D.!

Comment: Re:When did an open mind become political death? (Score 1) 727

by hercubus (#38576680) Attached to: Are Engineers Natural Libertarians Or Technocrats?

... in politics, even a hint of a politician displaying intelligence by changing his stance after new information and it's the political kiss of death...

It seems to me that no one cares about a flip-flop if the issue is technical. If some pol flip-flops over which agency should oversee Big Tobacco, who cares?

I would submit that people only care about flips and flops when the issue is moral and or ideological. Romney is despised because he flip-flopped abortion (moral) and healthcare (ideological). Plus he's a MoMo

And since we live in a country where the majority view nearly everything as ideological, a pol changing a position on almost anything is going to piss somebody off

Now if that's a reasonable explanation of why flip-flopping matters, can we move on to why everything has to be so ideological? As in "No, lowering tax rates really doesn't increase tax revenue - where the fuck is your head at, Newt?" Holding on to the lies that the Sainted Ronald of Reagan mumbled oh so many years ago just has to be ideological since it is so clearly not rational

Comment: Re:Speaking as a non-yank.. (Score 1) 630

by hercubus (#38461004) Attached to: Democratic Super PAC Buys Newtgingrich.com

Gingrich - isn't he the one that stole Christmas?

In the original story, the Grinch has a change of heart and gives Christmas back.

In the current story, The Gingrinch keeps everything he gets his filthy paws on, including the Roast Beast (obviously eating it all himself) then he dumps his wife after she finds out he's been having an affair with little Cindy Lou Who.

Your'e a foul one, Mister Gingrinch... You've got the sunny disposition of a seasick crocodile...

Comment: Nothing Doing (Score 2, Insightful) 230

by hercubus (#38373300) Attached to: In Nuclear Power, Size Matters

As other posters have said, the not-in-my-backyard effect means any proposal along these lines is dead-on-arrival in the United States for the near-term.

However, in the long-term there is likely going to be a "come to Jesus" moment when Texas turns to desert or California burns to the ground, when even hard-core skeptics will realize something has to give. Then maybe a plan like this would be dusted off and put into practice.

Wasn't it W. Churchill who said "You can trust the Americans to do the right thing after they've exhausted all other possibilities." Maybe we'll pull our heads out but it'll be a long time coming.

Things will have to get desperate, such as the situation in Galena Alaska where remoteness means energy costs are crazy high. As long as the dollar costs of coal extraction are low and there's not an undeniable disaster in progress due to climate change then coal-fired will burn on.

Comment: Re:Just a matter of time... (Score 1) 348

by hercubus (#38228722) Attached to: MIT Algorithm Predicts Red Light Runners

With this, its just a matter of time before these "predicted" red light runners are ticketed for their "pre-crime".... We slide further down the slope that Huxley warned us about....

Pre-crime is Philip K Dick as interpreted by Steven Spielberg

Orwell warned about a totalitarian state directing every action and every thought

We are already living in the brave new world Huxley predicted. I'd say we rocketed past Huxley twenty years ago, we are currently Orwellian, and we're one lab-experiment-gone-wrong away from "I Am Legend" (Richard Matheson)

Comment: Re:Should X be mandatory? (Score 5, Funny) 861

by hercubus (#38228370) Attached to: Should Composting Be Mandatory In US Cities?

For all non-negative values of X the answer is:

No

In my perfect libertarian world, whoever gets to the intersection firstest with the mostest guns wins. Stopping or even slowing down would never be mandatory, unless you're one of those bitches driving a Prius.

And shouting "Fire!" in that mythical crowded theatre is okay, but shouting "Firepower!" and following it up with a few rounds into the ceiling is even better.

Comment: Hey Sandeep (Score 1) 332

by hercubus (#38207784) Attached to: A Floating Home For Tech Start-ups

So Sandeep, since the USA is getting its fear and loathing on, and wouldn't really want you or your talent or your genius or your money because you're a dirty furriner, why don't you fly to Canada and I'll put you and Prakash on a boat headed south off the coast of a country that fears you and mistrusts you?

Just think of all the work you'll get done when you're near America yet completely cut off from distractions like scenery, clubs, fast cars and women and fun. Think of how close you'll be with your shipmates when you're with them day after endless, miserable day. Think of the convenience of getting all of your foods out of a can. Think of those quaint old English nautical customs everyone loves: the rum! and the buggery! and the lash! You do miss the English right? I knew you did!

What's that? You're just going to stay in Canada? Their money's actually worth something? You fucking hate Brits but Canada's not so bad? The Canadians aren't rocketing backwards into totalitarianism and ignorance and incompetence? Well mister, obviously you've never been to Toronto....

Comment: For Those Interested In The Product (Score 4, Interesting) 332

by hercubus (#38102150) Attached to: B&N Pummels Microsoft Patent Claims With Prior Art

The Nook Tablet (unrooted) is slightly more open than the Kindle Fire (unrooted)

Some links:

My takeaway is if you have your gold geek card, get the Fire (less money) and root it. If you're less adventuresome, get the Nook for more openness, but get an micro-SD card or you're stuck with only 1GB of free memory.

Comment: Re:That's becuase iPhone is only 27% of the market (Score 1) 357

by hercubus (#37952678) Attached to: Hardware Running Android Fails More Than iPhone, BlackBerry Hardware

Generally speaking, when your market share increases, so do the amount of devices you have in service. The more devices you have in service, the higher the percentage of failed devices.

The only way that makes sense is if you're making assumptions that you aren't enumerating.

If your device failure rate is say 0.5%, then how would that number change based on the number in service?

To answer, perhaps your production facility and/or procedures are known to degrade over time so the failure rate increases. Or perhaps your devices somehow degrade one another, so the more there are in the field the higher the degradation rate. Or perhaps you're speaking of manufacturers and models, so the more manufacturers there are then the more likely it is that incompetent or malicious manufacturers will enter the market.

Whatever your reasoning, it would be nice if you mentioned it, otherwise your statement looks like a noob confusing a quantity with a rate.

The person who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.

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