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How to contact a perfect stranger?

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  • by Sloppy (14984) *
    Get a throwaway email address, and post that? Example journal entry:

    Evil_Toy_Maker, I saw your picture and would like you to come visit me at the Days Inn tonight. email chunkylover53@yahoo.com to get the room #.

    Actually, it's hard to guess the real answer to your problem w/out knowing what you're really trying to do, and of course, that's exactly what you probably don't want to say. ;-)

    I think I remember reading about a weird crypto algorithm where one person shouts out a big number in public, then

    • Here are some popular numbers to shout out:
      • 69
      • 420
    • http://www.gnupg.org/ [gnupg.org], or http://www.pgp.com/products/freeware.html [pgp.com].

      The later is easier to use, while the former works on more platforms. Both can "talk" to each other.

      - Benad

    • I think I remember reading about a weird crypto algorithm where one person shouts out a big number in public, then another person shouts out a big number in public, and then the two of them somehow "magically" have a secret in common, which they can then use as a session key. Need to look this up, it's been a while... Maybe I'm wrong.

      You can do exactly that using public key crypto: the two parties each broadcast, for example, an RSA public key. They can then use their own private keys to encrypt and decry

  • propose a cafe near the Bourse 24Nov 18:00
  • Sorry to post this to the wrong place, but the right place has been archived. At any rate, I think you're completely evil in making motes move. I have junk overlapping on my desk. If everything (or anything) moved when I put something new down, I'd never know where anything was.
    • "Evil" :)

      It's a hunch. My UIs always try to display all possible actions. Ergo, all motes should be visible, even if only as small dots.

      • Evil is my word for doing something bad, without being offensive, because evil scientists are always better than their archnemisis, so who could possibly be insulted by being called evil?

        Anyway, you say yourself: 'but we've found that it's easy to remember what things are by their relative position on the screen'. I really like the sounds of this, but I really don't like the idea of no overlapping. Sounds like GEM/3 or Windows 1 to me :(

        But on a different note, I'm suddenly reminded of something else simi
        • I took "evil" as a compliment.

          I've done a little research on implementations of the clutter concept but there are none, AFAICS.

          The "everything is always visible" principle is not a problem if you allow objects to become very small, and if you allow the creation of arbitrary levels of embedded desktops.

          Anyhow I appreciate the feedback very much. We will be pushing to get a prototype ready early next year.

Q: How many IBM CPU's does it take to execute a job? A: Four; three to hold it down, and one to rip its head off.

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