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Comment: RIP /. (Score 0) 187

by hedronist (#48138613) Attached to: Interviews: Ask Florian Mueller About Software Patents and Copyrights

I've been looking at /. less and less because it just isn't as useful / relevant for me as it was years ago.

But I couldn't sleep, it's 0 Dark 30, and I thought, Why not look at what's happening on /.?

Florian Mueller? ARE YOU FUCKING KIDDING ME?!?!

I won't mourn the passing of /. like I did Groklaw, because even on it's best day /. was never as good as PJ on a bad one. As long as you're on a roll, why not invite Larry "Yes, I am an asshole" Ellison to give us instruction in the care and feeding of an Open Source project?

But seriously ... Florian Mueller? On patents and copyright?
I mean, Florian. Fucking. Mueller?
ARE YOU FUCKING KIDDING ME?!?!

Comment: Re:NO (Score 1, Informative) 248

by hedronist (#44425141) Attached to: Second SFO Disaster Avoided Seconds Before Crash

My understanding is that the visual aid for 28L is PAPI, not VASI. Unfortunately, it and the ILS have been out of service since early June because they are moving the threshold for 28L northward, farther away from the seawall. With both ILS and PAPI out, you truly are making a "visual approach".

Speaking as an old Army ATC, I cannot imagine why they didn't move the PAPI at the same time they moved the threshold. It doesn't take that long to recalibrate it. ILS does take longer, but an in-place PAPI is a powerful aid to staying on-path and on-slope.

Comment: We still read the local paper ... (Score 4, Interesting) 106

by hedronist (#44400173) Attached to: News Worth Buying On Paper

My wife and I still read the local rag (The Press Democrat) because, although we've read most of the national and international news online 1 or 2 (or sometimes even 3) days before, there are stories in Sonoma County (and parts north) that simply don't show up anywhere else. It used to be owned by the NY Times organization, but it was recently bought by a group of local investors who are emphasizing the Local News aspect.

We might switch to the electronic version of it, but we will not lose our need to know what's happening in our own community.

Comment: Re:Down-market is Oracle too (Score 1) 154

Yes, Larry's minions may have their hands on the old MySQL code, but there's this little project called MariaDB that is MySQL++++. It is a direct, bit-for-bit drop-in, and it's faster and has more features and they even do bug fixes for (gasp!) free. Admittedly it's run by a guy who probably doesn't know that much about MySQL, but he seems to be muddling through.

Oh, and there's a company called Percona that actually does support for MariaDB, adds features, and then feeds them back to the MariaDB community, but that's clearly an unsustainable model.

There are also a few people out there who would suggest that moving "downmarket" from Oracle to Postgres will actually feel like upmarket. And it's supported by professional groups on six continents.

Comment: Re:Clear your name, don't give up! (Score 1) 480

Actually, it was "Working Girl" (Harrison Ford, Melanie Griffith, Sigourney Weaver). Apparently Abraham stole it and put his name on it.

Reference needed. Saying that someone "stole" something is a fairly strong statement.

The story concept of one person's idea being stolen by someone else is not exactly new with Kevin Wade's 1988 script.
It's been a while since I've seen either of these movies, but the connection between them seems thin at best.

Comment: Re:Older workers cost more. (Score 1) 365

by hedronist (#43587863) Attached to: Can Older Software Developers Still Learn New Tricks?

Heck, these days performance seems to be dominated by lock contention, given the distributed nature of everything.

This, totally this.

I just rolled 40 years in this ridiculous industry, and the one thing that keeps coming up over ... and over ... and over again is that the total throughput of a system is often controlled by one or two locks / blocks (thread/process, disk, network, ear wax, etc.) buried deep, deep inside. You can micro-optimize code to your heart's content, but when you finally get around to profiling what's actually happening in the system that didn't scale from 100 hits/sec to 1000 hits/sec (or whatever) you arrive at an "Oh, shit!" moment when you realize that an assumption you made 6 months ago (Hey! This will never be a problem.) is now biting you in the ass.

The Military

United States Begins Flying Stealth Bombers Over South Korea 567

Posted by samzenpus
from the nice-day-for-a-flight dept.
skade88 writes "The New York Times is reporting that the United States has started flying B-2 stealth bomber runs over South Korea as a show of force to North Korea. The bombers flew 6,500 miles to bomb a South Korean island with mock explosives. Earlier this month the U.S. Military ran mock B-52 bombing runs over the same South Korean island. The U.S. military says it shows that it can execute precision bombing runs at will with little notice needed. The U.S. also reaffirmed their commitment to protecting its allies in the region. The North Koreans have been making threats to turn South Korea into a sea of fire. North Korea has also made threats claiming they will nuke the United States' mainland."
Technology

Festo's Drone Dragonfly Takes To the Air 45

Posted by samzenpus
from the little-flyer dept.
yyzmcleod writes "Building on the work of last year's bionic creation, the Smart Bird, Festo announced that it will literally launch its latest creation, the BionicOpter, at Hannover Messe in April. With a wingspan of 63 cm and weighing in at 175 grams, the robotic dragonfly mimics all forms of flight as its natural counterpart, including hover, glide and maneuvering in all directions. This is made possible, the company says, by the BionicOpter's ability to move each of its four wings independently, as well as control their amplitude, frequency and angle of attack. Including its actuated head and body, the robot exhibits 13 degrees of freedom, which allows it to rapidly accelerate, decelerate, turn and fly backwards."

Comment: Re:big deal (Score 0) 333

by hedronist (#42952425) Attached to: Google Patents Staple of '70s Mainframe Computing

ROFLCOPTER! Being the Geezer Geek® in our family/neighborhood I get the calls for ... almost everything. I had one woman (who shall remain nameless (except she's my older sister)) who complained of all sorts of horrible things happening. Turns out it was an out-of-disk and there was a huge number of ~whatever files all over her filesystem. Cleaning them all up gave her about 40% free disk.

You can do this in a number of ways. IBM chose to do all of them. Why do you find that funny? -- D. Taylor, Computer Science 350

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