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Comment Re:So what then? (Score 2) 294

I agree, labelling people based on half science is dangerous. There was a This American Life on the topic a couple of years ago, in which they interviewed the creator, users, and victims of the Psychopath Test used to evaluate if a person is a psychopath. Guess what, it was never intended to keep kids in jail, but it's routinely used in parole hearings to justify continued's not a big leap to use this stuff in that way.

Link to This American Life episode.

Comment FreeGeek Makes it Work (Score 2) 260

There is a non-profit company in many North American cities that takes old computers, puts them through a testing cycle, recycles all the parts that can't be used, and then builds workstations running linux for either donation to non-profits or cheap resale. They are great and always looking for help. According to the Wikipedia site, they have locations in: Portland, OR; Fayetteville, AR; Central FL; Chicago, IL; Columbus, OH; South Bend, IN (Michiana); Vancouver, BC (Canada); Seattle, WA; Minneapolis-Saint Paul, MN (Twin Cities); Toronto, ON (Canada); Providence, RI; Ferndale, MI (Greater Detroit area); Ephrata, PA (South East Pennsylvania); Athens, GA (Free I.T. Athens)

Comment Re:Misconduct (Score 2) 300

I'm don't think what you are saying is proven. The article abstract states that 94% of the misconduct was fraud, not being aggressive or antisocial as you indicate. Is there a well established baseline of men being more fraudulent than women? I would agree with you that men are typically aggressive (thanks testosterone), but dishonest? I'm not sure it flies... It's worth taking a look at the social/demographic aspects of this. The authors are looking for a way to target academic fraud, and knowing who commits it helps identify why, and how to address it.

The hardest part of climbing the ladder of success is getting through the crowd at the bottom.