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Comment: Re:No. I disagree. (Score 1) 137

by ScentCone (#49387483) Attached to: Tatooine Youth Suspected In Terrorist Attack

You really want to make the case that America of all countries has clean hands and a clean conscience in this dirty enterprise called war?

Do you mean that when a huge undertaking involving actual, you know, human beings taking action in opposition to a monstrously violent totalitarian regime sometimes involves some of those human beings doing assholish things ... that therefore the side that's acting to prevent oppressive totalitarianism is wrong to fight it? You'd rather allow groups like ISIS, or people like Stalin, or fun outfits like the Khmer Rouge to just carry on being brutal across the board as part of their purpose and policy than risk deploying against them on the off chance that not every action taken to oppose them, by everyone involved in the fight, will pass your purity test? Better to let the house burn down than to risk having anyone involved in trying to put out the fire be a jerk, I guess.

There is still hatred towards the Japanese over what they did

Right. Because that's what they (the country of Japan) set out to do. Cruelty and torture and rape weren't the actions of a few idiots/asshats in the Japanese army, those things were the stated tactics, the official policy, from the top down. That wasn't assholishness by abberration, and prosecuted (a la the WV guards at Abu Ghraib), that was marching orders. Your need to confuse the difference between that, and things like what Japan systematically did in China, shows you to be either completely misguided, or simply trolling. The latter, most likely.

Comment: Re:No. I disagree. (Score 1) 136

by ScentCone (#49386495) Attached to: Tatooine Youth Suspected In Terrorist Attack
When the people who actually drag school teachers out of their classroom to shoot them in the head for teaching girls publish videos of doing so online to show how serious they are about it, you can claim "land grab" and "it's all fake" to your heart's content, but you'll know you're lying, just like the rest of us will know you're lying.

And here in the US, we are told that women are denied the chance at education

Who's "we" and who is doing the telling? There are more women in college then there are men. So, basically you're just blathering.

we are a Christian nation

They "land grabbing" revolutionaries you're complaining about fought, among other things, to tear down the form of government under which they were living ... one that DID establish a government-backed single religion. They were so opposed to that, in the form of the constitution's first amendment, they baked freedom from that ever happening again right into the nation's chartering document. Not that you've probably ever read it or anything.

Comment: Re:No. I disagree. (Score 5, Interesting) 136

by ScentCone (#49386253) Attached to: Tatooine Youth Suspected In Terrorist Attack

I remember when Red Dawn came out (the first one) that we discussed the differnce between freedom fighters and terrorists. The answer was history.

No, the answer is: look at what they're actually fighting for. "Freedom fighters" who fight for the opportunity to deny women the right to go to school, or to set up a regime where people who aren't willing to claim faithfulness to one single state religion are not freedom fighters. It really is that simple. US revolutionaries fought to be free from what was essentially a military dictatorship (the monarchy) that didn't provide some rather important freedom-related features (like those we see protected in our constitution). When freedom fighters are fighting for actual freedoms, then that's what they are. When "freedom fighters" are fighting to institute totalitarian rule (like, say, Che Guevara and company did) they're not freedom fighters at all. The Taliban aren't fighting for freedom, they're fighting to set up a ruthless medieval theocracy. Doesn't matter what they call themselves, it's what they do.

Comment: Re:See nothing that says this is x86 (Score 1) 102

by rwa2 (#49383823) Attached to: Microsoft Announces Surface 3 Tablet

Yes, I got the $100 HP Stream 7 for my wife a few months ago, and I have to admit it's pretty nice. As long as you're only running a couple things at a time, it's easy to forget you're not using a "real" computer. It keeps up with most social media sites just fine, without those long pauses and freezes that I get on my old EeePC901. Even have her Steam account set up on it and it does a great job at the 2D games like Mini Metro.

The main problems are the UI, of course... click and drag is difficult to get working on the tiny touchscreen, the tiny desktop elements are tricky to hit consistently, and the onscreen keyboard feels absolutely primitive compared to the default keyboards on Android/iOS nowadays. Someday I'll bother hooking up a USB keyboard/mouse or twiddler something to it and it should be fine, though.

People complain about the 1GB of RAM constraining the multitasking, but at $100 a pop, you can afford to build up a collection of these things and fill up your desk and walls with tablets running an individual app or website on each.

My other main annoyance with it is that it will spontaneously run out of batteries every other day or so if I don't leave it plugged in. Sometimes it'll be fine for a few days on standby, and then over the course of a few more hours it'll suddenly drain itself to 0% and shutdown and refuse to turn back on again until I've plugged it in for several minutes to build up enough charge to attempt to boot. I'm sure there's a simple fix I could just Google for (err, maybe Bing), but by the time I grab another device, trying to tweak drivers or power settings on that thing is the furthest thing from my mind :P

Comment: Re:So... (Score 2) 108

by Kjella (#49382949) Attached to: SCOTUS: GPS Trackers Are a Form of Search and Seizure

Not to look a gift outbreak of common sense in the mouth, but how the fuck can GPS trackers be a form of search and seizure and civil forfeiture NOT be a form of search and seizure?

It's a form of seizure, but the supreme court hasn't found it an unreasonable one. And it's been used for a very long time. Basically, the issue was that without forfeiture they had a hard time catching the owners of smuggling ships. As long as you can't establish them as an accessory to the crime or you have jurisdiction problems, they can legally provide the supplies while the criminals operate on an asset-less basis. So the solution was to declare the assets - in this case the ship - used in illegal acts forfeit, making it a risk and a cost to be used in crime. This goes all the way back to the British.

I've been reading some of the court cases and it seems the minority has been trying really hard to find tortured ways of getting out of their own past precedents as the cases become more and more unreasonable but the majority falls down on "we've approved of civil forfeiture for 200 years, we can't overturn that now". They really, really, really don't like interpreting an old law in a new way. So without acts of Congress saying this is not okay, I don't think anything will change.

P.S. Civil asset forfeiture puts the US way ahead of the UK as fascist country in my opinion, I'm not really even sure if it should qualify as an "innocent until proven guilty" system anymore since you can be robbed blind and need to prove your innocence to the court. It stinks to high heaven.

Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no substitute for a good blaster at your side. - Han Solo

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