Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Cyber Monday Sale! Courses ranging from coding to project management - all eLearning deals 25% off with coupon code "CYBERMONDAY25". ×

Submission + - 2GBps Reached in 5G Trial (

WyldPhyr writes: Nokia Corporation and NTT Docomo demonstrated its 5G wireless technology in an indoor trial and achieved down link speeds of more than 2 Gbps using higher frequencies in the 70 Ghz spectrum. According to Nokia, the result of the indoor trial underscores the readiness of both operators to deliver a state-of-the-art 5G wireless network by 2020 and beyond. NTT Docomo is the largest mobile operator in Japan while Nokia is the third largest equipment manufacturer worldwide. Seizo Onoe, chief technology officer at NTT Docomo believed that high frequency spectrum can be used not just for small cells as a way to complement the existing network. It is also useful for building solid area coverage through coordination with existing lower frequency band. NTT Docomo aims to introduce the 5G wireless technology during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Submission + - Why Linux Mint 17.1 Missed It's Mark ( 1

NeoGeo64 writes: From memory leaks to general glitchiness, Linux Mint 17.1 isn't quite up to par with previous releases. Why is this? In the following story, one techie attempts to discover why. What do you all think? Have any of you experienced memory leaks or other strange bugs in Mint 17.1?

Submission + - Net Neutrality in Argentina!

plerner writes: Argentina has a new Net Neutrality law; law no. 27.078. It was passed by congress this week and published yesterday. Original text in Spanish can be foud at

Article 1 reads (translated by google):"Object. Declared of public interest the development of Information Technologies and Communications, Telecommunication, and their associated resources, establishing and ensuring complete network neutrality.
Its purpose is to allow access to all the inhabitants of Argentina to the services of information and communication equitable social and geographical conditions, with the highest quality standards.
This rule is of public order and excludes any type of content regulation, whatever their means of transmission."

Theres a little bit more about it on articles 56 and 57 of the same law.

Submission + - Scientists Discover That Exercise Changes Your DNA writes: The human genome is astonishingly complex and dynamic, with genes constantly turning on or off, depending on what biochemical signals they receive from the body. Scientists have known that certain genes become active or quieter as a result of exercise but they hadn’t understood how those genes knew how to respond to exercise. Now the NYT reports that scientists at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm have completed a study where they recruited 23 young and healthy men and women, brought them to the lab for a series of physical performance and medical tests, including a muscle biopsy, and then asked them to exercise half of their lower bodies for three months. The volunteers pedaled one-legged at a moderate pace for 45 minutes, four times per week for three months. Then the scientists repeated the muscle biopsies and other tests with each volunteer. Not surprisingly, the volunteers’ exercised leg was more powerful now than the other, showing that the exercise had resulted in physical improvements. But there were also changes within the exercised muscle cells’ DNA. Using technology that analyses 480,000 positions throughout the genome, they could see that new methylation patterns had taken place in 7,000 genes (an individual has 20–25,000 genes).

In a process known as DNA methylation, clusters of atoms, called methyl groups, attach to the outside of a gene like microscopic mollusks and make the gene more or less able to receive and respond to biochemical signals from the body. In the exercised portions of the bodies, many of the methylation changes were on portions of the genome known as enhancers that can amplify the expression of proteins by genes. And gene expression was noticeably increased or changed in thousands of the muscle-cell genes that the researchers studied. Most of the genes in question are known to play a role in energy metabolism, insulin response and inflammation within muscles. In other words, they affect how healthy and fit our muscles — and bodies — become. Many mysteries still remain but the message of the study is unambiguous. “Through endurance training — a lifestyle change that is easily available for most people and doesn’t cost much money,” says Sara Lindholm, “we can induce changes that affect how we use our genes and, through that, get healthier and more functional muscles that ultimately improve our quality of life.”

Submission + - Critical Git security vulnerability announced

An anonymous reader writes: Github has announced a security vulnerability and has encourage users to update their Git clients as soon as possible. The blog post reads in part: "A critical Git security vulnerability has been announced today, affecting all versions of the official Git client and all related software that interacts with Git repositories, including GitHub for Windows and GitHub for Mac. Because this is a client-side only vulnerability, and GitHub Enterprise are not directly affected. The vulnerability concerns Git and Git-compatible clients that access Git repositories in a case-insensitive or case-normalizing filesystem. An attacker can craft a malicious Git tree that will cause Git to overwrite its own .git/config file when cloning or checking out a repository, leading to arbitrary command execution in the client machine. Git clients running on OS X (HFS+) or any version of Microsoft Windows (NTFS, FAT) are exploitable through this vulnerability. Linux clients are not affected if they run in a case-sensitive filesystem....Updated versions of GitHub for Windows and GitHub for Mac are available for immediate download, and both contain the security fix on the Desktop application itself and on the bundled version of the Git command-line client."

Submission + - Extracting Data from the Microsoft Data (

An anonymous reader writes: The Microsoft Band introduced last month hosts a slew of amazing sensors, but like so many wearable computing devices, users are unable to access their own data. A Brown University professor decompiles the app, finds that the data is transmitted to the Microsoft "cloud", and explains how to intercept the traffic to retrieve the raw minute-by-minute data captured by the Band.

Submission + - Cause And Effect: How a Revolutionary New Statistical Test Can Tease Them Apart

KentuckyFC writes: Statisticians have long thought it impossible to tell cause and effect apart using observational data. The problem is to take two sets of measurements that are correlated, say X and Y, and to find out if X caused Y or Y caused X. That's straightforward with a controlled experiment in which one variable can be held constant to see how this influences the other. Take for example, a correlation between wind speed and the rotation speed of a wind turbine. Observational data gives no clue about cause and effect but an experiment that holds the wind speed constant while measuring the speed of the turbine, and vice versa, would soon give an answer. But in the last couple of years, statisticians have developed a technique that can tease apart cause and effect from the observational data alone. It is based on the idea that any set of measurements always contain noise. However, the noise in the cause variable can influence the effect but not the other way round. So the noise in the effect dataset is always more complex than the noise in the cause dataset. The new statistical test, known as the additive noise model, is designed to find this asymmetry. Now statisticians have tested the model on 88 sets of cause-and-effect data, ranging from altitude and temperature measurements at German weather stations to the correlation between rent and apartment size in student accommodation.The results suggest that the additive noise model can tease apart cause and effect correctly in up to 80 per cent of the cases (provided there are no confounding factors or selection effects). That's a useful new trick in a statistician's armoury, particularly in areas of science where controlled experiments are expensive, unethical or practically impossible.

Submission + - After 40 Years As A Shoulder-Level Double Amputee, Man Gains Two Bionic Arms (

MojoKid writes: Les Baugh, a Colorado man who lost both arms in an electrical accident 40 years ago, is looking forward to being able to insert change into a soda machine and retrieving the beverage himself. But thanks to the wonders of science and technology — and Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) — he'll regain some of those functions while making history as the first bilateral shoulder-level amputee to wear and simultaneously control two Modular Prosthetic Limbs (MPLs). "It's a relatively new surgical procedure that reassigns nerves that once controlled the arm and the hand," explained Johns Hopkins Trauma Surgeon Albert Chi, M.D. "By reassigning existing nerves, we can make it possible for people who have had upper-arm amputations to control their prosthetic devices by merely thinking about the action they want to perform."

Submission + - Will Ripple eclipse Bitcoin? writes: This year's biggest news about Bitcoin may well turn out not to be the repeat of its surge in value last year against the dollar and other state currencies but its impending eclipse by another independent but corporate-backed digital currency. Popularly known as Ripple, XRP shot up in value last year along with other cryptocurrencies that took advantage of the hype around Bitcoin. However, among the top cryptocurrencies listed in, a site that monitors trading across different cryptocurrency exchanges, Ripple is the only one that not only regained its value after the collapse in the price of Bitcoin but has more than doubled from its peak last year. In September it displaced Litecoin to become the second most valuable cryptocurrency. Even more surpising, a Ripple fork, Stellar, is one of the two other cryptocurrencies in the Coinmarketcap top ten that have risen sharply in value during the last few weeks.

What makes Ripple different from Bitcoin? Strictly speaking, Ripple isn't the name of the digital currency but of the decentralized payment network and protocol created and maintained by the eponymous Ripple Labs. Users of the Ripple system are able to transact in both cryptocurrency and regular fiat currency like the dollar without passing through a central exchange. XRP is the name of the native unit of exchange used in the Ripple network to facilitate conversion between different currency types.

Submission + - Hackers Compromise ICANN, Access Zone File Data System 2

Trailrunner7 writes: Unknown hackers were able to compromise vital systems belonging to ICANN, the organization that manages the global top-level domain system, and had access to the system that manages the files with data on resolving specific domain names.

The attack apparently took place in November and ICANN officials discovered it earlier this month. The intrusion started with a spear phishing campaign that targeted ICANN staffers and the email credentials of several staff members were compromised. The attackers then were able to gain access to the Centralized Zone Data System, the system that allows people to manage zone files. The zone files contain quite bit of valuable information, including domain names, the name server names associated with those domains and the IP addresses for the name servers.

ICANN officials said they are notifying any users whose zone data might have been compromised.

Submission + - Xen Cloud Fix Shows the Right Way To Patch Open-Source Flaws ( 1

darthcamaro writes: Amazon, Rackspace and IBM have all patched their public clouds over the last several days due to a vulnerability in the Xen hypervisor. According to a new report, the Xen project was first advised of the issue two weeks ago, but instead of the knee jerk type reactions we've seen with Heartbleed and now Shellshock, the Xen project privately fixed the bug and waited until all the major Xen deployment were patched before any details were released. Isn't this the way that all open-source projects should fix security issues?

Submission + - Marten Mickos' Plan for OpenStack? Total Victory (

darthcamaro writes: Marten Mickos is not yet officially part of HP and it's OpenStack cloud (yet) but he will be soon. On Sept 11 Mickos' company Eucalyptus announced that it was being acquired by HP, though the deal has not yet officially closed. That's not stopping Mickos from making bold predictions about OpenStack — an effort that he has been a competitor against for most of the last four years. Speaking at the OpenStack Silicon Valley event Mickos laid out his plan

"For the last one and a half decades, I have been trying to reach full victory for open source," Mickos said.

Submission + - Should Docker Move to a Non-Profit Foundation? (

darthcamaro writes: Docker has become the new hotness in virtualization technology — but it is still a project that is led by the backing of a single vendor — Docker Inc. Is that a problem? Should there be an open-source Foundation to manage the governance and operation of the Docker project? In a video interview — Docker founder and Benevolent Dictator for Life Solomon Hykes says — No.

Submission + - Millions of IPv4 Addresses Reclaimed - IPv4 is not dead ! (yet). (

darthcamaro writes: Back in 2011, IANA said it had allocated its last /8 block of freely available IPv4 address space. As it turns out, here we are in 2014 and IANA has now reclaimed several million IPv4 addresses that it is now giving to regional internet registries. While that means that unallocated IPv4 space is still available, don't get your hopes up that it's limitless, ARIN only has just over one million IPv4 addresses left for the Americas.

Submission + - Google Introduce HTML 5.1 Tag to Chrome (

darthcamaro writes: Forget about HTML5, that's already passe — Google is already moving on to HTML5.1 support for the upcoming Chrome 38 release. Currently only a beta, one of the biggest things that web developers will notice is the use of the new "picture" tag which is a container for multiple image sizes/formats. Bottom line is it's a new way to think about the "IMG" tag that has existed since the first HTML spec.

A fanatic is a person who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill