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Comment: Re:Explain this to me. (Score 1) 148

by harryjohnston (#49360181) Attached to: First Nuclear Power Plant Planned In Jordan

So ... now the Americans are a trustworthy source? You might want to make up your mind about that.

(Never mind that that quote merely claims that they had stopped their program for the time being, which is entirely plausible. Doesn't mean they can't start up it again if we let them get away with it.)

Comment: Re:Explain this to me. (Score 1) 148

by harryjohnston (#49360155) Attached to: First Nuclear Power Plant Planned In Jordan

Really? Just Americans? Last time I checked the sanctions were just a *tad* wider than that.

And, gee, last time I checked *I* wasn't an American, either. Just because you're idiot enough to believe Iranian propaganda doesn't mean the rest of the world is.

Sure, if we could bully the US into getting rid of its nuclear weapons that would be a good idea, in my opinion, though North Korea, Pakistan, China, and Russia would come first on my list. But for the time being it isn't practical to much more about any of them. We *may* however be able to keep Iran from getting them.

Comment: Re:Explain this to me. (Score 1) 148

by harryjohnston (#49348665) Attached to: First Nuclear Power Plant Planned In Jordan

Where do you get this crap about Iran being "crazy"? Fox News? Israeli and U.S. government propaganda?

General knowledge.

To be fair, upon going back over my collection of news reports I was surprised how few of them were about Iran as opposed to other Islamic nations. On the other hand I specifically claimed that Iran has a reputation for being batshit crazy rather than that it actually is batshit crazy. Scott Adams once pointed out that if you analyzed Iran's actions rather than their words they didn't seem nearly as insane.

Even so, there were some relevant items about Iran - and none about Jordon, though a more thorough search might turn up more.

Rafsanjani and Mashaei barred from Iran presidency poll - Only eight of the 686 people who registered as potential candidates were reportedly cleared to stand.

Ashton visit to Iran sparks co-operation and controversy - "Do you think our country has no order that you can go anywhere you want and see anyone you want to see?" the head of the judiciary, Ayatollah Sadeq Larijani, demanded on Tuesday night.

Iran sentences British-Iranian activist Ghoncheh Ghavami 'over volleyball game' - speaks for itself

Wikipedia, Human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, Freedom and equality of religion - Freedom to convert from Islam to another religion (apostasy), is prohibited and may be punishable by death.

There's also Iran's own constitution. The first five articles are all about how Islamic Iran is. In other words, they're a theocracy and don't even try to hide it. The preamble even says "... with the hope that this century will witness the establishment of a universal holy government and the downfall of all others."

The Supreme Leader has considerable power and is chosen entirely on religious grounds. In other words, he's chosen precisely because he's batshit crazy.

Can you really be so sure that one day the Supreme Leader won't decide to nuke Israel, counting on God to protect Iran from Israel's counterstrike?

Comment: Re:Explain this to me. (Score 1) 148

by harryjohnston (#49342449) Attached to: First Nuclear Power Plant Planned In Jordan

I'm not sure that Jordan has blown up any teenagers in Mexico recently. We're comparing Jordan and Iran, remember, not Iran and anybody else.

I'm not claiming, mind you, that Jordan is necessarily really any more trustworthy or any less batshit crazy than Iran. I know little about Jordan, so it's entirely plausible that the difference is entirely PR.

Comment: Re:Explain this to me. (Score 2) 148

by harryjohnston (#49341521) Attached to: First Nuclear Power Plant Planned In Jordan

A couple of possibilities spring to mind. I'm just speculating, mind you.

1) Because Jordon aren't insisting on enriching the uranium themselves, or aren't planning to use enriched uranium in the first place?

2) Because their government has a reputation for trustworthiness rather than a reputation for being batshit crazy?

("Trustworthiness" is of course a relative term for governments. But still, there's a pretty big gap between Jordon and Iran.)

Comment: Re:Have we handed the government control over it? (Score 1) 347

by harryjohnston (#49247455) Attached to: FCC Posts Its 400-Page Net Neutrality Order

The rule is written very broadly. It basically covers *anything* that improves performance for the other party, no matter how it is implemented.

However, it turns out that the rule's scope is defined later on in the document to explicitly exclude interconnections. So it won't stop peering, which is good, on the other hand it also wouldn't apply directly to the Netflix wrangle.

It might still apply to in-network hosting, I'm not sure. I think you could argue that was new traffic, which just happens to replace the old traffic. Or that it's a form of interconnection. I'll let the lawyers figure that one out, or at least someone who has read the entire document. :-)

Comment: Re:Have we handed the government control over it? (Score 2) 347

by harryjohnston (#49247437) Attached to: FCC Posts Its 400-Page Net Neutrality Order

The Wikipedia article calls it "internet transit" and distinguishes it from "peering" as follows: "Transit is distinct from peering, in which only traffic between the two ISPs and their downstream customers is exchanged and neither ISP can see upstream routes over the peering connection." That more or less matches my original understanding. Mind you, there are no citations.

The rule disallowing paid prioritization is very broad, and does *not* have an exception for normal network management. (They actually call out explicitly that this rule does not have that exception, unlike the first two.)

However, clause 30 appears to restrict the scope of the rule to explicitly exclude peering. So that's OK after all.

panic: kernel trap (ignored)

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