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Wikipedia

Aussie Tech-Focused Wiki Launched 155

Posted by timothy
from the history-is-written-by-the-koala dept.
daria42 writes "Wikipedia's great for some things — like looking up the in-depth history of 4chan, for example — but not great for others, such as finding out the micro-history of the technology sector in certain countries. That's why Australian technology publication Delimiter has launched a public wiki site purely focused on the Australian technology sector — its personalities, issues, companies, and events. Already the site has better coverage of some areas than Wikipedia, leading to the question of whether more such small wikis should be created for certain verticals."
PlayStation (Games)

+ - EA to charge for game demos->

Submitted by Kohato
Kohato (1762540) writes "Electronic Arts wants you to start paying for your demos. That's not how they would word it of course, they're calling it "premium downloadable content" that will launch before the game is released.
The always controversial Michael Pachter sat in on a Electronic Arts investor meeting today in which the world's second largest publisher laid out this diabolical plot..."

Link to Original Source
Google

+ - SPAM: Google stops censoring in China

Submitted by alphadogg
alphadogg (971356) writes "Google has stopped censoring results in China, acting on a decision it made in January.

On Monday, Google stopped censoring Google Search, Google News and Google Images on Google.cn, according to a blog post from Chief Legal Officer David Drummond. "Users visiting Google.cn are now being redirected to Google.com.hk, where we are offering uncensored search in simplified Chinese, specifically designed for users in mainland China and delivered via our servers in Hong Kong," he wrote. As expected, the Chinese government didn't entertain allowing Google to continue operating an uncensored Google.cn. The Hong Kong work-around is "entirely legal," he said."

Link to Original Source
Education

+ - Lie-in for teenagers sees drop in absenteeism-> 1

Submitted by krou
krou (1027572) writes "Monkseaton High School in North Tyneside, UK, began an experiment in October that saw its 800 pupils ranging in age from 13-19 attend school an hour later than normal at 10am. Early results indicate that 'general absence has dropped by 8% and persistent absenteeism by 27%'. Head teacher Paul Kelley supported the idea because he believed that 'it was now medically established that it was better for teenagers to start their school day later in terms of their mental and physical health and how they learn better in the afternoon', and he now claims that the children are becoming 'happier better educated teenagers' as a result of the experiment. The experiment is being overseen by Oxford neuroscience professor Russell Foster. 'He performed memory tests on pupils at the school which suggested the more difficult lessons should take place in the afternoon. He said young people's body clocks may shift as they reach their teenage years — meaning they want to get up later not because they are lazy but because they are biologically programmed to do.'"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:anyone know of an evolutionary purpose to owl-i (Score 2, Insightful) 234

by halsver (#31398682) Attached to: Insomniacs, the Phantoms of the Internet

IANAD, but your example of the appendix is not a clear cut case. How most of the human body actually functions on a microbial level is not understood. The appendix could serve a function that is perhaps redundant, but helpful.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermiform_appendix#Possible_secondary_functions

Music

Triumph of the Cyborg Composer 502

Posted by samzenpus
from the musician-vs-machine dept.
An anonymous reader writes "UC Santa Cruz emeritus professor David Cope's software, nicknamed Emmy, creates beautiful original music. So why are people so angry about that? From the article: 'Cope attracted praise from musicians and computer scientists, but his creation raised troubling questions: If a machine could write a Mozart sonata every bit as good as the originals, then what was so special about Mozart? And was there really any soul behind the great works, or were Beethoven and his ilk just clever mathematical manipulators of notes?'"
Robotics

Robotics Prof Fears Rise of Military Robots 258

Posted by timothy
from the oh-you-worry-too-much dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Interesting video interview on silicon.com with Sheffield University's Noel Sharkey, professor of AI & robotics. The white-haired prof talks state-of-the-robot-nation — discussing the most impressive robots currently clanking about on two-legs (hello Asimo) and who's doing the most interesting things in UK robotics research (something involving crickets apparently). He also voices concerns about military use of robots — suggesting it won't be long before armies are sending out fully autonomous killing machines."
Medicine

Daily Sex Helps Improve Fertility 174

Posted by samzenpus
from the use-it-or-lose-it dept.
mmmscience writes "While fertility studies lately seem to have been exclusively focused on in vitro fertilization [IVF], new data coming out of Australia may help with unaided successful conceptions. The study has found that men who have ejaculate daily produce sperm with less damaged DNA. While such actions decrease sperm concentration, it does increase motility, meaning healthier sperm have a better chance of making it all the way to the egg. Good news, as another report has found severe chromosome abnormalities in over 90% of IVF eggs, meaning artificial insemination is just now discovering a whole new field of problems."

Comment: Re:In a bind (Score 5, Insightful) 865

by halsver (#28547817) Attached to: Staying In Shape vs. a Busy IT Job Schedule?

At the bare minimum, you need to move closer to where you work. Your commute is costing you your health and is eating your paycheck. Looking at the money you are making versus the costs, you might be better off working at the 7-11 down the street.

Where does your social life fit in to this? I know when I work a 60+ hour week I need the weekend just to unwind, let alone see friends or do things I enjoy.

My solution, get an apartment within 5 miles of your work and then ride a bicycle there.

Privacy

Ranchers Have Beef With USDA Program To ID Cattle 376

Posted by kdawson
from the chipping-in dept.
Ponca City, We Love You writes "The NY Times reports that farmers and ranchers oppose a government program to identify livestock with microchip tags that would allow the computerized recording of livestock movements from birth to the slaughterhouse. Proponents of the USDA's National Animal Identification System say that computer records of cattle movements mean that when a cow is discovered with bovine tuberculosis or mad cow disease, its prior contacts can be swiftly traced. Ranchers say the extra cost of the electronic tags places an onerous burden on a teetering industry. Small groups of cattle are often rounded up in distant spots and herded into a truck by a single person who could not simultaneously wield the hand-held scanner needed to record individual animal identities. The ranchers also note that there is no Internet connection on many ranches for filing to a regional database. 'Lobbyists from corporate mega-agribusiness designed this program to destroy traditional small sustainable agriculture,' says Genell Pridgen, an owner of Rainbow Meadow Farms. The notion of centralized data banks, even for animals, has also set off alarms among libertarians who oppose NAIS. One group has issued a bumper sticker that reads, 'Tracking cattle now, tracking you soon.' 'They can't comprehend the vastness of a ranch like this,' says Jay Platt, the third-generation owner of a 22,000 acre New Mexico ranch. 'This plan is expensive, it's intrusive, and there's no need for it.'"
The Courts

+ - Judge in Pirate Bay case formally scrutinized 2

Submitted by metacell
metacell (523607) writes "The judge in the Pirate Bay case, who was accused of being partial due to being a member of pro-IP organizations and having several connections to the prosecution's lawyers, will be formally scrutinized. The appeals court has selected Anders Eka to perform the scrutiny. Anders Eka is himself a member of a research team at Stockholm University, together with the prosecution's two lawyers, Monique Wadsted and Peter Danowsky.
Article in Swedish, sorry!
http://www.dn.se/kultur-noje/musik/the-pirate-bay-nya-turer-i-javsfragan-1.870677"
The Courts

+ - Supreme Court Nominee Sotomayor's Cyberlaw Record

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens
Hugh Pickens writes "Thomas O'Toole writes that President Obama's choice for Associate Supreme Court Justice, Sonia Sotomayor, authored several cyberlaw opinions regarding online contracting law, domain names, and computer privacy while on the Second Circuit. Judge Sotomayor wrote the court's 2002 opinion in Specht v. Netscape Communications Corp., an important online contracting case. In Specht, the Second Circuit declined to enforce contract terms that were available behind a hyperlink that could only be seen by scrolling down on a Web page (pdf). "We are not persuaded that a reasonably prudent offeree in these circumstances would have known of the existence of license terms," wrote Sotomayor. Judge Sotomayor wrote an opinion in a domain name case, Storey v. Cello Holdings LLC in 2003 that held that an adverse outcome in an administrative proceeding under the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy did not preclude a later-initiated federal suit (pdf) brought under the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (ACPA). In Leventhal v. Knapek, a privacy case, Judge Sotomayor wrote for the Second Circuit that New York state agency officials and investigators did not violate a state employee's Fourth Amendment rights when they searched the contents of his office computer for evidence of unauthorized use of state equipment. While none of these cases may mean much as far as what Judge Sotomayor will do as an Associate Supreme Court Justice "if confirmed, she will be the first justice who has written cyberlaw-related opinions before joining the court," writes O'Toole."

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