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Comment: Re:But Apple is still DOOOOMED (Score 0) 208

by hahn (#44994765) Attached to: Apple Now the World's Most Valuable Brand, Knocks Off Coca-Cola
"Samsung doing better than Apple..."

What exactly does this mean? Profits? Samsung beat Apple in *one quarter* (barely) when the S4 just came out and the iPhone 5 was more than 6 months old. In any 4 quarters, Apple still beats Samsung in smartphone profits and the gap will likely widen this quarter.

And keep in mind that Samsung has churned out dozens of phone models (including cheap models that help them shore up profits by sheer volume) and released them in many more markets than Apple. It's like bragging that you beat Usain Bolt in a 100 meter dash while he had two broken ankles. Does that really prove how fast you run? It certainly doesn't mean you're slow, but are you really faster than Usain Bolt?

Hyundai and Kia make more cars than BMW. They're also "catching up" in profits: . And yet, how many people draw comparisons between the two companies saying that Hyundai is "doing better" than BMW? By making the comparison, you are implying that the success of one company is going to hurt the success of the other.

Comment: Re:Netflix (Score 1) 215

by hahn (#44937303) Attached to: Apple Offers Refund To Stiffed Breaking Bad Season Pass Customers
>Whoever pays $22.99 for half a season, or any other TV show, when it is available on Netflix is beyond me. Don't get me started on bluray box sets.

Presumably, he purchased it last year and thought it was good for the *entire* season. Then probably became upset at the start of the second half of the season when he discovered that he had to pay another $22.99. The most recent episodes of BB aren't on Netflix until several months later.

I paid for both half seasons because BB is one show I don't want to wait to watch. Unlike the whiny guy who sued Apple though, I did a little math and realized that $22.99 was only getting me 8 episodes.

Comment: Re:Vaporware... (Score -1) 315

You're missing the point. Even if you don't use Airplay, iOS devices have a lot of games on there already that are "good enough" for the vast majority of people. They fill a gaming need that no longer requires a console. And it's vastly easier and simpler to pick up an iOS device and simply tap an app to start playing. Plus, you can game almost *anywhere*. There's only a certain number of hours you can play video games. So if you get your fill playing a game on a bus or a train, you're a lot less likely to want to play even more games once you get home.

Comment: Re:Vaporware... (Score 4, Interesting) 315

It doesn't need to be as powerful as a console level graphics. This same argument was applied to how iPhone cameras couldn't compete with full frame sensor DSLR's. It didn't need to: http://www.flickr.com/cameras Hardcore gamers make the mistake in assuming that everyone who buys a console has the same requirement for graphics power as they do. It's quite the contrary. I know at least 7 friends as well as myself who have PS3's that sit there and collect dust. We originally bought it for FIFA 2010. Then we started to use it a lot more for Netflix when that became available. And now that all the TV's have Netflix built in (and 4 of us have Apple TV's), the PS3 never gets touched. We were all just talking about this a couple of weeks ago - none of us have plans to get any of the new consoles. They're simply not worth it for us. And I somehow doubt our situation is unique, or even rare.

Comment: Re:Who else? (Score 3, Informative) 144

by hahn (#43327995) Attached to: Apple Loses the iPad Mini Trademark
Straight from the USPTO letter:

...The term “IPAD” is descriptive when applied to applicant’s goods because the prefix “I” denotes“internet.” According to the attached evidence, the letter “i” or “I” used as a prefix and would beunderstood by the purchasing public to refer to the Internet when used in relation to Internet-relatedproducts or services. Applicant’s goods are identified as “capable of providing access to the Internet”. When a mark consists of this prefix coupled with a descriptive word or term for Internet-related goodsand/or services, then the entire mark may be considered merely descriptive...

...The term “PAD” is also descriptive of the applied for goods. The term “pad” refers to a “pad computer”or “internet pad device”, terms used synonymously to refer to tablet computers, or “a complete computercontained in a touch screen.” Please see the attached dictionary definition. In addition, the attachedexcerpts from third party websites show descriptive use of the term “pad” in connection with tabletcomputers. This marketplace evidence shows that the term “pad” would be perceived by consumers asdescriptive of “pad computers” with internet and interactive capability. Applicant’s goods are identifiedas “a handheld digital mobile electronic device comprising tablet computer”...

and the kicker...

...In this case, both the individual components and the composite result are descriptive of applicant’s goods and do not create a unique, incongruous, or non-descriptive meaning in relation to the goods being small handheld mobile devices comprising tablet computers capable of providing internet access. Therefore, the mark is merely descriptive of a feature or characteristic of the goods and registration is refused under Section 2(e)(1) of the Trademark Act.

The rationale specifically points out that "i" and "Pad" (not just "Mini") are descriptive and NOT unique. At best, it's a poorly worded ruling. At worst, the USPTO didn't bother to check the previous valid trademarking of "iPad".

Comment: Re:Who else? (Score -1) 144

by hahn (#43326073) Attached to: Apple Loses the iPad Mini Trademark

Read the USPTO letter. It breaks down the name and claims that each part of the name is merely descriptive - "i" stands for internet, "pad" describes a class of pad computers, and "mini" describes a size that is smaller than the typical size in this class of computers.

So while Samsung might not be able to name a product "iPad", they *CAN* name a product "iPad Mini".

Yes, our legal system is run by idiots.

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