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Censorship

+ - Digg listened, the digital revolt succeeds

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "From Kevin Rose' blog on dig: Today was an insane day. And as the founder of Digg, I just wanted to post my thoughts... In building and shaping the site I've always tried to stay as hands on as possible. We've always given site moderation (digging/burying) power to the community. Occasionally we step in to remove stories that violate our terms of use (eg. linking to pornography, illegal downloads, racial hate sites, etc.). So today was a difficult day for us. We had to decide whether to remove stories containing a single code based on a cease and desist declaration. We had to make a call, and in our desire to avoid a scenario where Digg would be interrupted or shut down, we decided to comply and remove the stories with the code. But now, after seeing hundreds of stories and reading thousands of comments, you've made it clear. You'd rather see Digg go down fighting than bow down to a bigger company. We hear you, and effective immediately we won't delete stories or comments containing the code and will deal with whatever the consequences might be. If we lose, then what the hell, at least we died trying. Digg on, Kevin"
Space

+ - New Horizons Probe Returns New Images of Jupiter

Submitted by
SeaDour
SeaDour writes "The Pluto-bound New Horizons space probe, launched a little over a year ago, recently succeeded in passing through a narrow navigational keyhole by Jupiter. Using the gas giant's tremendous gravity, the craft now has a significant boost toward its final destination, shaving three years off its journey. As it passed through the Jovian system, the probe took some fantastic images of the neighborhood, including detailed observations of erupting volcanoes on Io, time-lapse photography of Jupiter's tumultuous atmosphere, and even the faint ring system that was first discovered in Voyager photography. These new images prove the tremendous capabilities of the small probe, which is set to reach Pluto in 2015."
Games

The Ten Most Important Games 577

Posted by Zonk
from the a-good-place-to-start dept.
Taking a page from the National Film Preservation Board, the History of Science and Technology Collections at Stanford University and a group of five prestigious games industry figures have inducted ten games into a sort of 'canon'. The New York Times reports that some of these titles represent the start of weighty gaming genres, while all are laudable for their place in gaming history. "[Henry] Lowood and the four members of his committee -- the game designers Warren Spector and Steve Meretzky; Matteo Bittanti, an academic researcher; and Christopher Grant, a game journalist -- announced their list of the 10 most important video games of all time: Spacewar! (1962), Star Raiders (1979), Zork (1980), Tetris (1985), SimCity (1989), Super Mario Bros. 3 (1990), Civilization I/II (1991), Doom (1993), Warcraft series (beginning 1994) and Sensible World of Soccer (1994)." Most likely, future years will see additional titles inducted into this game canon.
Communications

Patent Filed for Underwater GPS 236

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the under-achievements dept.
Matthew Sparkes writes "GPS doesn't work underwater, as the signal cannot reach the satellite from a submersible, but researchers have now patented an add-on to the system that could provide GPS navigation for submarines. A base station is tethered to the sea bed at a known depth and GPS location. A submersible anywhere in the area sends out a sonar pulse to which the base station replies with a signal, giving a GPS position and depth as well as the bearing angle from which the submersible's request arrived. The submersible then uses its own depth, which is easily measured, plus the round trip pulse time and the bearing angle sent by the base, to calculate its own position."
Software

+ - Making a Living from open source (a year later)

Submitted by
asimbaig
asimbaig writes "Its been over a year since I last posed a question on whether its "really" possible to make a decent living building open source software. I got a lot of good feedback from slashdotters and the open source community. I thought I would provide an update on our experience. In one short year, CATS, our open source Applicant Tracking System has become the number one ATS in the market including commercial packages. We didn't have any revenue last year and we didnt focus on it either since we were too busy building the sofware. We started selling the hosted solution this year and have sold about 100 seats in 2 months bringing us $3000/month in recurring revenue. We just signed an OEM / Source Code license agreement with a large company for $200k. I expect to sell 4-5 of these OEM deals this year. I think making CATS open source played a significant role in our success to date....Marketing."

Machines certainly can solve problems, store information, correlate, and play games -- but not with pleasure. -- Leo Rosten

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